Engine ICE Works!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Doesnt egine ice just raise the boiling point of the coolant so even if you are aver heating you dont know.

Doesnt egine ice just raise the boiling point of the coolant so even if you are aver heating you dont know.
As I said:

...under 16 pounds of pressure, as with the stock 1.1 bar rad cap, water boils at around 235 degrees F. If the engine reaches that temperature, it blows water out the overflow, and we say it overheated. With ethylene glycol coolants, the boil point is raised to 265/270 under the same pressure (50/50). Many newer propylene glycol coolants raise the boil point even higher. So, what really happens is that the engine coolant can now get as hot as 290 without boiling over, and we say it didn't overheat. Evans NPG coolant won't boil until 370 without pressure,...

... colder isn't necessarily better, and the fact that coolants allow an engine to run a little hotter while staying in control of its temperature is normally a good thing.

You appear to be making an assumption that an engine with coolant temperatures of over 230 is overheated. The red zone on the car you drive is pegged at 255/260. Even that is mostly because the coolant boils at 265, and boiling coolant doesn't cool the engine.

I'd be concerned that that was inaccurate, and that mixing a crystalline substance in your radiator water might not be a good idea. He could be right though.

I would be really curious about this as well. I wonder how we could find out???

It might be informative to whip some up and then raise it to a boil in a pan, letting it cool some without boiling very long, then heating it again, for a few cycles, and see what gets deposited on the pan surface.

Did Gorr say what concentration it was mixed at?

Another thing to check is whether it actually breaks the surface tension of water. If you gently set a needle on the surface of a bowl of water horizontally, it will float. Mix soap, or another surfactant with the water and it won't.

It might be informative to whip some up and then raise it to a boil in a pan, letting it cool some without boiling very long, then heating it again, for a few cycles, and see what gets deposited on the pan surface.

Did Gorr say what concentration it was mixed at?

Another thing to check is whether it actually breaks the surface tension of water. If you gently set a needle on the surface of a bowl of water horizontally, it will float. Mix soap, or another surfactant with the water and it won't.

ya, i saw that on modern marvels or some show like that the other day...

It might be informative to whip some up and then raise it to a boil in a pan, letting it cool some without boiling very long, then heating it again, for a few cycles, and see what gets deposited on the pan surface.

Did Gorr say what concentration it was mixed at?

Another thing to check is whether it actually breaks the surface tension of water. If you gently set a needle on the surface of a bowl of water horizontally, it will float. Mix soap, or another surfactant with the water and it won't.

Grey, there was no specific formula given. Just the statement....."its distilled water and aspartame (sp).

Does anyone know if you could use Low Tox by prestone? Its propylene glycol also.

prestonelowtox.jpg

Yes, you can.

will it work as good as engine ice???

should be close.

It might be informative to whip some up and then raise it to a boil in a pan, letting it cool some without boiling very long, then heating it again, for a few cycles, and see what gets deposited on the pan surface.

Did Gorr say what concentration it was mixed at?

Another thing to check is whether it actually breaks the surface tension of water. If you gently set a needle on the surface of a bowl of water horizontally, it will float. Mix soap, or another surfactant with the water and it won't.

Sounds like a Mythbusters suggestion?

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