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mr426

Engine ICE Works!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

31 posts in this topic

Well i had some suggestions in a previous post about my 426 spewing out coolant on trail rides and i thought something was wrong but after doing research on here i used engine ice , new radiator cap and installed a coolant reservoir bottle. i just went riding and i did not have one boil over!!!!!! i dont even need the overflow bottle with engine ice! just wanted to say thanks for all the good tips you guys (and ladies!) post on thumper talk!!!!!!

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It sure does! On my last ride it was muddy, slimy GA redclay singletrack. Not one boil over slip slidin' around in 2nd and 3rd gear.

Another thing that works are Works Connection radiator braces. I slid the tip of my left radiator shroud into a pine tree and turned it into a Z, the braces bent back a bit, but the radiator stayed straight in the cage. Good stuff!

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Water Wetter and Engine Ice are two different products for two different purposes. They can be used together, and I recommend it.

Engine Ice is basically nothing more exotic than propylene glycol coolant premixed with distilled water in a ready to use form. You can get the same results for less by mixing your own, but it is convenient.

Water Wetter is a surfactant, somewhat like a soap without suds. It breaks the surface tension of plain wetter down so that the transfer of heat from metal parts to the water and then from the water to the radiator is improved. It's not as big a help when using coolants as it is with straight water, but it can't hurt.

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What I do is mix 50-50 coolanol and cool-aide, both maxima products. Motocross action did an arcticle a few months back that showed this combo resulted in the lowest temps.

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Water Wetter and Engine Ice are two different products for two different purposes. They can be used together, and I recommend it.

Engine Ice is basically nothing more exotic than propylene glycol coolant premixed with distilled water in a ready to use form. You can get the same results for less by mixing your own, but it is convenient.

Water Wetter is a surfactant, somewhat like a soap without suds. It breaks the surface tension of plain wetter down so that the transfer of heat from metal parts to the water and then from the water to the radiator is improved. It's not as big a help when using coolants as it is with straight water, but it can't hurt.

Grey, soap without suds...I wonder how much different it is than liquid laundry detergent???

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Don't know. I'd imagine that the mix of ingredients in dishwasher or laundry detergent could include some stuff you wouldn't want in the radiators, but I could be wrong. No more Water Wetter than is necessary in the cooling system, one bottle could last quite a while.

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What I do is mix 50-50 coolanol and cool-aide, both maxima products. Motocross action did an arcticle a few months back that showed this combo resulted in the lowest temps.
Virtually the same thing as Engine Ice and water wetter. (Coolanol is a premixed coolant/water combo, too) I'm guessing the Cool-Aide you're using is the ready to use version and not the concentrate?

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Well i had some suggestions in a previous post about my 426 spewing out coolant on trail rides and i thought something was wrong but after doing research on here i used engine ice , new radiator cap and installed a coolant reservoir bottle. i just went riding and i did not have one boil over!!!!!! i dont even need the overflow bottle with engine ice! just wanted to say thanks for all the good tips you guys (and ladies!) post on thumper talk!!!!!!

I tried engine ice on my old RC51 race bike and saw no difference in the operating temperature during the race.

The flaw in your presumption that engine ice fixed your problem is that you changed multiple items at once yet proclaim that "Engine Ice Works!!". You could have just as easily have said, "A new radiator cap fixed my overheating problem!".

My 426 runs/ran extremely hot as well so I'm very glad to see you've beat the overheating nut. However, try putting the old radiator cap back, go for a ride and let us know how it goes.

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Gray - yes, both the ready to use type

trying to remember the test MXA did, I think no one product really stood out from the rest as way better. The combo I listed was the best by only a few degrees as I recall, and they're easy to use as they're both ready to go out of the bottle

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In evaluating a coolant, temps should be measured in three key places to tell the whole story:

The head ( not the coolant in the head) (with a better coolant, the head will be cooler.)

The coolant temperature leaving the engine. (A better coolant will be hotter)

The coolant temperature leaving the radiator (a better coolant will be colder)

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Gray, so do you mix water whetter 50/50 with distilled water or run straight WW? Had a little overheating last weekend in Baja.

What do you think about a small electric fan mounted to the Devol rad. guards, what kind of stator output would be required? I am going to do the WR stator /flywheel conversion soon on my 01 426 after I saw your post.

Thanks for the information regarding these fine machines.

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Gray, so do you mix water whetter 50/50 with distilled water or run straight WW?
Water Wetter is used at the rate of one ounce per quart.

The engine will actually run a little cooler with straight water treated with a surfactant like WW than with any coolant I'm aware of. All coolants reduce water's ability to absorb and transfer heat to some extent. The problem is that under 16 pounds of pressure, as with the stock 1.1 bar rad cap, water boils at around 235 degrees F. If the engine reaches that temperature, it blows water out the overflow, and we say it overheated. With ethylene glycol coolants, the boil point is raised to 265/270 under the same pressure (50/50). Many newer propylene glycol coolants raise the boil point even higher. So, what really happens is that the engine coolant can now get as hot as 290 without boiling over, and we say it didn't overheat. Evans NPG coolant won't boil until 370 without pressure, but I have no information as to its ability to transfer heat comparably to any other coolant or water.

Ironically, an engine would be more efficient without a cooling system. The idea of a gasoline engine in the first place is to extract energy from a liquid fuel in the form of heat, then convert that heat to mechanical power. Roughly 33% of the energy released from the fuel escapes through the exhaust system (which is why turbochargers add so much to an engine's efficiency) and another 33% is wasted in heating up a bunch of water. Being made of metal, however, there are practical limits to how hot the assembly can be allowed to get, so we're stuck with what we have. The point of bring this up is that colder isn't necessarily better, and the fact that coolants allow an engine to run a little hotter while staying in control of its temperature is normally a good thing.

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very good point gray.... so you want as much heat as possible without causing damage to the engine. makes sense.

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.... so you want as much heat as possible without causing damage to the engine. makes sense.
That's a little over simplified, but within the constraints I listed, it's about right.

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Don't know. I'd imagine that the mix of ingredients in dishwasher or laundry detergent could include some stuff you wouldn't want in the radiators, but I could be wrong. No more Water Wetter than is necessary in the cooling system, one bottle could last quite a while.

I was just reading Eric Gorrs Honda CRF book. It says the water wetter is distilled water and Aspartame...the artificial sweetener. Might be interesting to mix something up. It would certainly be cheaper.

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I'd be concerned that that was inaccurate, and that mixing a crystalline substance in your radiator water might not be a good idea. He could be right though.

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