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CaptainKnobby

useing zipties to secure spokes

28 posts in this topic

Has anyone used zipties to secure your spokes? When I bought my 06 450f I took some zipties and wraped them around the spokes and tightened them up and cut off the excess. All you do is......where the spokes cross to form an X you just take one ziptie and wrap it around both spokes and sinch it up tight and cut off the excess,Continue to do this until all spokes are ziptied. Since I have done this all of my spokes are still tight and none have worked loose:applause: I just thought I would share this with everyone since it is easy to do and would help your spokes to stay secure and not work out and become loose. You can even do what I did and get colored zipties and do red and yellow or what ever color patern you want.:thumbsup:

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Oh sorry! but maybe some newbie may see it and it will help them.

you bet!

neat idea. anybody else do this?

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I read about this in a magazine. But the riders used a thin metal/aluminum wire to tie them together in case the spokes broke. It wasn't to prevent them from breaking.

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The original reason for this is to strengthen the wheel by placing some lateral pre-tension on the spoke so that if one set of spokes loosens under a torque loading, the other in the pair should be drawn taut by the same load, and pull against the looser one. If you look at wire spoke bicycle wheels laced with a crossing pattern, you'll see that the spokes are actually crossed to achieve this.

It does provide a measure of safety in the case of a spoke breaking, as it may keep the broken spoke out of the chain, etc.

I don't do this, and my wheels generally don't loosen up.

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The original reason for this is to strengthen the wheel by placing some lateral pre-tension on the spoke so that if one set of spokes loosens under a torque loading, the other in the pair should be drawn taut by the same load, and pull against the looser one. If you look at wire spoke bicycle wheels laced with a crossing pattern, you'll see that the spokes are actually crossed to achieve this.

It does provide a measure of safety in the case of a spoke breaking, as it may keep the broken spoke out of the chain, etc.

I don't do this, and my wheels generally don't loosen up.

Yea, I think you're right about the "safety". I believe using safety wire on the spokes was an old skool method on old racing bikes to keep a broken spoke in place. I check my spokes at every chain lube, they loosen up REAL quick now that they are using aluminum nipples.

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I check my spokes at every chain lube, they loosen up REAL quick now that they are using aluminum nipples.

But if you will ziptie them together or safetywire them they wont work loose anymore:rolleyes:...... Ive got 34 hours on my 06 450f and ziptied my spokes together when I first bought it and not a spoke one has came loose.:thumbsup:

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But if you will ziptie them together or safetywire them they wont work loose anymore:rolleyes:...... Ive got 34 hours on my 06 450f and ziptied my spokes together when I first bought it and not a spoke one has came loose.:thumbsup:

I have checked mine since new, and since then I have over 50 hours on my bike, and havent had to tighten a spoke. I don't use any zip tie method either.

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But if you will ziptie them together or safetywire them they wont work loose anymore:rolleyes:...... Ive got 34 hours on my 06 450f and ziptied my spokes together when I first bought it and not a spoke one has came loose.:thumbsup:

my spokes have not come loose since the initial break in, I check them all the time... seems like a lot of work (and zipties) for a minimal benefit...

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I have checked mine since new, and since then I have over 50 hours on my bike, and havent had to tighten a spoke. I don't use any zip tie method either.

This comment I find totally amazing.

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It fits in with my experience, though. I torqued the wheels when I brought the bike home, and after a year, not one loose spoke. And no Zip-Ties or wire.

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Here in New England our bikes see a lot of rocks. I am thinking this probably is the difference, and why our YZF's over the past severall years NEED frequent spoke maintenence. Seems that guys that pit ride over a lot of higher speed rocky terrain need more spoke maintenence. What I have seen happen many times is the nipples pound the rim, and stretch the head of the spoke nipple, and I also see the hub end of the spokes start to pull into the hub.

I remember a dumb buddy asking me to try his bike because he was getting front end waggle at higher speeds. It felt like he had a flat, when in fact his spokes were SOOOO loose I could wiggle the rear rim by hand. His hub and spoke nipples were junk.

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There you have it. Rim distortion is the main reason spokes ever loosened, and the newer, stronger rims available these days have cut the problem way back for most of us. But then, there are your Real East Coast Rocky Sections :thumbsup:

We have rocks here, too:

But most of the time, you can get between them. The bad ones are the "submerged" ones in the dunes. :thumbsup:

Big%20Rock1sm.jpg

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I have over 75 hours on my bike and I have never found loose spokes. I do check them often and did have a few a little on the loose side during break in. This is from MX riding...I think I put them to the test once in a while.

6209d8a3-3ff8-4ad9-97c2-51a70110ed77l.jpg

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back to the original topic:

There was actually a product made that snapped to each set of spokes where they crossed to do the same job as the zip ties. I dont know who made them, but I have seen them on bikes.

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Years ago, in road bicycle racing, especially in Europe with cobble stone roads, racers used to tie-n-solder their spokes to add rigidity. I think the zip-tie mod is a cheap and ineffective method of doing that. The big difference is you can't get a zip-tie tight enough for that to work, and the spokes will still slide inside the zip-tie, making the whole idea utterly useless. Even in the bicycle industry this has been dropped since rim technology has come very a long way in rigidity and weight. Hell, now they ride 6-8 spoke radially laced wheels.

I got 7 hard seasons on my 426 and never had a problem with the spokes. Normal maintenance should suffice. I wouldn't waste my time nor money on that mod. And it just looks cheap.

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Different strokes for different folks!!!.....Yall may need to ride a little harder!

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