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Stainless Oil Filter

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Hello Dan I have been running my Scotts oilfilter for over a year now with no problems. :) I change my oil about every 80-100 miles or about 2 rides/races. Clean with contact or carburator cleaner, takes about 15 minutes. I think it's worth the money, with all the filters I would have bought I have paid for it.

Ride Often, Ride Safe and Have Fun :D

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Of course now that I write this something will happen to my stock filter but I'm with MX Tuner. I've never had to buy another filter. Original one has been working for 2 years with an oil change and filter check every two weeks.

Jon

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MXTuner, I think it is time to change out your original filter. Is it even brass colored anymore or just stained black? Has the glue held up that keeps the fiter attached to the top & bottom? You should let Yamaha know the results, maybe they will lengthen the life of these $12.00 goodies.... You definitely got your moneys worth out of it. I will even offer you one of the many used 1-4times filters that litter my parts shelf....Yamaha says 2 to 4 oil changes before swapping - I guess they want to sell a lot of filters.....

I also have bought into the Scotts filter voodoo! Yep it is supposed to flow better, etc......All I know is that it looks trick, is easy to clean & cost $60-70bucks, ouch! Is it any better? It is manufactured better, but worth the money? Maybe, maybe not. I never had a stock filter problem either....my 1.5cents worth

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I`m with Ga426owner... I would definately change a 3 yr old filter.... Would you go 4-5 oil changes on your car/truck without changing the oil filter? ? I doubt it very much...

There are 2 main reasons why I bought the Scotts. .. First, it filters 3 times better than stock... second, it`s re-usable. Stock will filter any particles above 90-95 microns and the Scotts will filter anything above 35 microns..

They seem pricy, but they pay for themselves in the long run.

The decision is yours to make.

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The stock filters work fine for a long time. Why would it wear out? If it doesn't get any tears in it and the rubber seals are ok, then the filter is fine. I've changed mine once just because I felt bad, didn't really need to. Why would smaller particle filtering be better either? Hey I guess they do look cool. :)

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Yeah, but you can't even *see* the cool looking Scotts filter when you're riding.

Alain, I do clean the filter every oil change. Funny about their claims about it filtering a smaller particle. Look at the stock filter and look at the SS filter. Its been a while since I looked at them side by side but it seems they are made of a mesh that would filter the same size particles.

Sorry, I have other things I need to spend $70 on before I buy one of those filters.

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Scotts filters flow a greater volume and filter finer crap out of your oil. They never wear out.They do look cool and you engine will love you for it. Just roll it back and forth in solvent to see all the stuff your motor was saved from.

Bman

[ February 17, 2002: Message edited by: bman ]

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Originally posted by bman:

Scotts filters flow a greater volume and filter finer crap out of your oil. They also have a check valve that will let oil flow when cold. They never wear out.They do look cool and you engine will love you for it. Just roll it back and forth in solvent to see all the stuff your motor was saved from.

Bman

How can it flow more AND filter finer particles?

Also, the stock filters have the same check valve.

I reuse the stockers until the rubber seals get overly squished or I put a hole in them. I’m not afraid to throw them away at only around ten bucks, I always have four or five spares laying around and sometimes if I don’t fell like cleaning one, or, on a new bike if I have a lot of debris, in the garbage it goes.

One thing I’ve never understood about the stainless filters is, why do you need stainless? I’ve yet to see the stockers corrode. Why would they? They are always coated in oil!

Jes one of them things that makes me go “Hmmmmmm.”

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Originally posted by Hick:

How can it flow more AND filter finer particles?

Also, the stock filters have the same check valve.

I reuse the stockers until the rubber seals get overly squished or I put a hole in them. I’m not afraid to throw them away at only around ten bucks, I always have four or five spares laying around and sometimes if I don’t fell like cleaning one, or, on a new bike if I have a lot of debris, in the garbage it goes.

One thing I’ve never understood about the stainless filters is, why do you need stainless? I’ve yet to see the stockers corrode. Why would they? They are always coated in oil!

Jes one of them things that makes me go “Hmmmmmm.”

Consistent flow under all conditions:

Stainless steel will stand up to the stress of heat, high pressure and physical handling much better than paper or brass. This filter maintains

consistent flow under all conditions including cold start ups and or under extreme heat. A one inch square of this micron filter material will flow 1.9

gallons of 90 weight oil per minute at only 1 psi pump pressure (70 degrees F). Our typical filter size is 30 sq. in. which equals the flow of 57

gallons per minute. Standard paper filters do not flow well when the oil is cold, often causing the bypass valve to open allowing unfiltered oil to

enter your engine, uhg!

Stolen from Scottsperformance.com

I was incorrect before. That's how it is done.

Bman

[ February 08, 2002: Message edited by: bman ]

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I'm with Tuner on this one....Sure Scotts is going to compare its filter to a paper filter. Lets see a comparison to the stock brass one or the aftermarket k&n filter for $9.00.

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Not every oil change but every other oil change though... I haven`t looked at both of them side by side but I guess that I kinda took their word for it as far as the filtering of the particle. I guess their marketing thing worked as they suckered me into buying one... :)

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Originally posted by bman:

Standard paper filters do not flow well when the oil is cold, often causing the bypass valve to open allowing unfiltered oil to enter your engine, uhg!

Um, the stock filter isn’t paper. I guess it may be brass, not sure, a magnet will stick to it however.

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This technology has been in use for many years and has proven itself in

NASCAR, Formula One and the Aerospace industry. These filters have been in

use in the off road motorcycle world for over 5 years. Manufacturers like

Yamaha have even supplied their own version of it. The KTM factory guys have

even been buying them for their own bikes (even though they can't legally

endorse the product). In other words this is not a new idea, just a new

application of proven technology. And of course, one of these has been in my WR since day one.

Bman

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Originally posted by Dan Lawrence:

I couldn't get a magnet to stick to mine. At least not the filter element.

When I read that I had my doubts, so I tried it again and right now I’m looking at a new Yamaha filter hanging from a magnet, by the screen or element.

I’m using one of those medium sized telescoping “parts grabber ” magnets, it sticks much better to the rim of the filter, but it will stick strongly enough to the element to suspend it.

Maybe a film of oil would insulate the element, but the reason I originally realized a magnet would stick to it was my first or second oil change after I bought my ’00 new. I grabbed a magnet to find out if any of the large amount of engine debris I saw on the filter was metallic, and was surprised when the filter itself stuck to my magnet.

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Underneath the mesh are steel supports holding the two ends together. I could get my magnet to stick there but not to the mesh itself.

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