HEADS UP!!!

Site upgrade in progress... Core site functions are working, but some non-critical features/functions will be temporarily unavailable while we work to restore them over the next couple of weeks.

Please post any bugs you encounter, but before you do, check to see if it's already listed.

Thanks for your patience while we work to improve the community.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
ingramo

How hard is it to change fork springs?

34 posts in this topic

How difficult is it to change the fork springs on an '07 Yz450? This coming from a guy who is mechanically inclined but has never tackled anything dealing with suspension. Can I do it? Thanks in advance

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very simple, if that's all you're planning to do. Best practice would also be to change the inner chamber oil, and upgrade the fork seals at the same time, but even that's not as difficult as you'd think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So is it as easy as just pulling the fork caps off and swapping the springs out?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, not that simple. But simple.

Remove the forks. Loosen the rebound adjuster at the bottom of the fork, and the Damper cartridge (cap) on the top of the fork. Remove the forks.

Unscrew the fork cap/damper cartridge, invert the fork and drain.

Stand each tube upside down, back the rebound clicker all the way out, unscrew the rebound adjuster, compress the fork, and disconnect the damper rod from the adjuster.

Remove the cartridge, swap the spring, and reinstall the rebound adjuster. Fill the outer chamber with the prescribed amount of oil. Finish the assembly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
No, not that simple. But simple.

Remove the forks. Loosen the rebound adjuster at the bottom of the fork, and the Damper cartridge (cap) on the top of the fork. Remove the forks.

Unscrew the fork cap/damper cartridge, invert the fork and drain.

Stand each tube upside down, back the rebound clicker all the way out, unscrew the rebound adjuster, compress the fork, and disconnect the damper rod from the adjuster.

Remove the cartridge, swap the spring, and reinstall the rebound adjuster. Fill the outer chamber with the prescribed amount of oil. Finish the assembly.

Don't forget the $85 fork cap wrench and a good way to hold them suckers while you unscrew them. Yea you can use a big cresent wrench just don't scratch the hardware. That was the case with my 05 (twin chambers) before I decided to let the suspension shop do the front and back for $180. I feel a little defeated letting the shop do it though :bonk: Go for it if you think it's possible!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the first place, you only need to spend $20 for the fork cap wrench:

http://www.motionpro.com/motorcycle/tools/fork_cap_wrench/

It lacks the little fork on one end that used to hold the rod up while you take the adjuster off (figure two on page 5-29 of the manual), but you can use anything for that, including a sturdy pair of needle nose pliers, as I do.

In the second place, the best "vise" to use for loosening or tightening the fork caps is the lower triple clamp. That's why I said to loosen them before you remove the forks (loosen the upper clamp before that, though). Use a round bar or the front axle inserted in the axle hole to hold the lower tube while working with the rebound adjuster.

This job is absolutely possible in a home shop. I've had five sets of them apart in mine.

If you want to service the cartridge, you'll need one more tool; a base valve wrench:

http://www.motionpro.com/motorcycle/tools/fork_compression_valve_removal_tool/

That, and a good seal driver, all for about what you'd spend on the Yamaha wrench, and you're completely set up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good info! I'll do it myself next time. I thought I got a quote for $80 for the cap wrench with the fork tool on it? I'll try the needle nose pliers next time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In the first place, you only need to spend $20 for the fork cap wrench:

http://www.motionpro.com/motorcycle/tools/fork_cap_wrench/

It lacks the little fork on one end that used to hold the rod up while you take the adjuster off (figure two on page 5-29 of the manual), but you can use anything for that, including a sturdy pair of needle nose pliers, as I do.

In the second place, the best "vise" to use for loosening or tightening the fork caps is the lower triple clamp. That's why I said to loosen them before you remove the forks (loosen the upper clamp before that, though). Use a round bar or the front axle inserted in the axle hole to hold the lower tube while working with the rebound adjuster.

This job is absolutely possible in a home shop. I've had five sets of them apart in mine.

If you want to service the cartridge, you'll need one more tool; a base valve wrench:

http://www.motionpro.com/motorcycle/tools/fork_compression_valve_removal_tool/

That, and a good seal driver, all for about what you'd spend on the Yamaha wrench, and you're completely set up.

Thanks for the link to the cartridge tool remover tool. I'm thinking the link for the fork cap wrench is the wrong size though. The 06 YZ's have a 49mm fork cap and the wrench in the link is for a 46-50 mm cap.

I was swapping out springs and figured I'd change the inner cartridge oil at the same time...that is until I realized I could not get the base valve seperated from the fork cap! For now, I fudged it and just changed the springs and outer fork oil and will go back and do the inner oil after getting the right tool for the base valve. I agree that the spring and outer oil is very easy to change.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the link to the cartridge tool remover tool. I'm thinking the link for the fork cap wrench is the wrong size though. The 06 YZ's have a 49mm fork cap and the wrench in the link is for a 46-50 mm cap.

Maybe, but that's the one I've used on 5 sets of forks, and it works just fine. .040" (1mm) out of 1.967" (50mm) isn't a huge difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That would be better, alright. It doesn't show up on the MP web site, though. Maybe it's new.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finished the fork springs last night and it was way easier than I thought. As for getting the rebound adjuster off, I just used a 15mm open end wrench, worked great. Thanks again Gray.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
No, not that simple. But simple.

Remove the forks. Loosen the rebound adjuster at the bottom of the fork, and the Damper cartridge (cap) on the top of the fork. Remove the forks.

Unscrew the fork cap/damper cartridge, invert the fork and drain.

Stand each tube upside down, back the rebound clicker all the way out, unscrew the rebound adjuster, compress the fork, and disconnect the damper rod from the adjuster.

Remove the cartridge, swap the spring, and reinstall the rebound adjuster. Fill the outer chamber with the prescribed amount of oil. Finish the assembly.

Just curious, I have done mine several times now, and have never clicked my rebound clicker all the way out. does this make the manual's "base assy finger tight to dampener rod" gap measurement more accurate???

700

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just curious, I have done mine several times now, and have never clicked my rebound clicker all the way out. does this make the manual's "base assy finger tight to dampener rod" gap measurement more accurate???

700

That's pretty much the point of it. Basically, the adjuster is supposed to bottom against the rod, then the nut gets tightened. If the clicker is too far in, the adjuster assembly will bottom against the clicker push rod instead, and you won't have the correct distance between the clicker screw and the rebound valve.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you want to service the cartridge, you'll need one more tool; a base valve wrench:

http://www.motionpro.com/motorcycle/tools/fork_compression_valve_removal_tool/

That, and a good seal driver, all for about what you'd spend on the Yamaha wrench, and you're completely set up.

it's not mentioned in the yamaha manual on servicing the cartridge that this wrench is needed? Is it hidden in another section?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
it's not mentioned in the yamaha manual on servicing the forks that this wrench is needed? Is it hidden in another section?
Top of page 5-90

Note:Should read: Page 5-30

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You'll definitely need a tool to remove the base valve while you hold the fork cap with a wrench. You can make one if you can find a large 36mm nut or bolt head.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0