HEADS UP!!!

Site upgrade in progress... Core site functions are working, but some non-critical features/functions will be temporarily unavailable while we work to restore them over the next couple of weeks.

Please post any bugs you encounter, but before you do, check to see if it's already listed.

Thanks for your patience while we work to improve the community.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
The_Missile

Valve Shim Replacement

7 posts in this topic

So far I have measured two intake valves at .1 mm and a third a .15mm, the exhaust are spot on at .25mm each

I have a feeler guage (I have no idea if this is the right name for the tool) incremented in .05 mm steps. Is this accurate enough as I see some people have measured their gaps at .26mm ?

I phoned my local toolshop and he said thats all they have available (.05 increments)

Confirmation would be good to hear !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

.05 mm is a bit course. Imperial feeler gauges are available in 0.001 in increments (0.0254 mm)That's what I use.

Also saw your post on the footpeg mod. It is very important to weld them. I know of a guy who was paralysed when his footpeg broke off. Don't take any chances! They need to be TIG welded because they are quite thin. Don't use too much filler because the spring needs to fit over top. Most machine shops should be able to do this for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Took em in to get em welded today.

TIG welding ? whats that ? I have no idea what kind of welding the guy will do, I thought welding was welding ??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 - TIG: Tungsten inert gas

2 - MIG welding

3 - Arc or "Stick" welding

[ January 29, 2002: Message edited by: NH Kevin ]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the welder knows what he is doing you don't need to worry. The barrel is quite thin so it requires someone with experience. TIG and MIG are best for thin material.

With TIG welding the filler metal is added by the operator, so he can add as much or as little as needed.

During MIG welding, the filler metal is added constantly. They are also known as a wire feed welder - you have probably seen this type before. If your peg is MIG welded it will be just as strong, but you will probably need to grind off the excess filler metal in order to fit the spring.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0