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drtbk4ever

"Brakes for Dummies" question

10 posts in this topic

Hey Gang,

I am a complete noob when it comes to brakes so please excuse my ignorance. I just finished greasing swingarm and linkage. After I put the rear wheel back on, I was checking the operation of the rear brake.

It seems the brake pads do not retract much after I let off the pedal. So I did numerous searches. I believe my issue is the calipers and seals have some dirt/mud clogged up there from last years rides.

DSC01127.jpg

This photo doesn't show the brake pads dragging, but it's the only photo I have of the rear brake.

So I did more searching and reviewed the manual and didn't find the answer so I'll ask you, in order to get to the calipers, do I HAVE to drain the brake fluid? I don't really want to have to replace the fluid and bleed the lines unless I really have to.

Any input is greatly appreciated.

Cheers.

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disk pads always rub.As long as you can spin the wheel it's o.k

dave

Hi Dave, thanks for that info. I can still turn the wheel. I can understand the pads rubbing as it is a floating disk system. My concern was with the caliper pistons (I think they're called) not retracting much at all. I'm under the impression the caliper pistons would retract somewhat and the pads would float.

Am I incorrect in that assumption?

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They should not travel as far as you think...

think about it for a minute... Long travel equates to longer stroke on the master cylinder witch is applied by the pedal...

If the wheel is hard to turn by hand that would suggesst and issue. If it spins okay with a little pad hiss... Your good... Go ride and analyze the terrain in front of you instead of the bike while it sits on a stand...:applause:

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They should not travel as far as you think...

think about it for a minute... Long travel equates to longer stroke on the master cylinder witch is applied by the pedal...

OK, that makes sense.

If the wheel is hard to turn by hand that would suggesst and issue. If it spins okay with a little pad hiss... Your good...

I'll check on this again.

Go ride and analyze the terrain in front of you instead of the bike while it sits on a stand...:applause:

I would love to go for a ride, however, the foot of snow still on the ground means analyzing the bike while it sits on the stand is my only alternative for the next couple of weeks.

Thanks for the input.

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a foot of snow is the main reason you should be out riding, I did for the first time last month in the UK when we had some good snow,

It was the most fun ive had for years on a bike - just go steady and enjoy the slide

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a foot of snow is the main reason you should be out riding, I did for the first time last month in the UK when we had some good snow,

It was the most fun ive had for years on a bike - just go steady and enjoy the slide

Once upon a time I would have studded up the tires and been riding all winter. Now I am just a wimp.

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there is no relese mech. at allfor a disc brake, it relies on movment of the rotor to move the pads back into the caliper, the faster the didc is turning the more it moves. the floting caliper is to compensate for uneven were on the pads so both sids contavt evenly

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Hey Bill, the caliper piston will only retract enough to release the clamping pressure on the disk. The caliper is only forced back into the housing as far as the size of the disk taking into account any warpage. There aren't any retraction springs like you find in the drum brake systems. All these things are what makes disc brakes stonger and better in all ways than drum type brakes. :applause: WR Dave.

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Hey Bill, the caliper piston will only retract enough to release the clamping pressure on the disk. The caliper is only forced back into the housing as far as the size of the disk taking into account any warpage. There aren't any retraction springs like you find in the drum brake systems. All these things are what makes disc brakes stonger and better in all ways than drum type brakes. :applause: WR Dave.

Thanks for all your help guys. I will now sleep better.

Cheers.

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