Tire presure?

im 5'11 195 Lbs and im wondering what is a good tire presure for soft terrain with a MH3 at my size.

12PSI in the Front 11 to 12PSI in the rear.

Yep, 12 is usually about right...

Are te results of low tire pressure pinch flats? if so what are the cons of too high of pressure, less cushioning?

I run 12 in both.

Are te results of low tire pressure pinch flats? if so what are the cons of too high of pressure, less cushioning?

If you run too soft you can easily pinch the tube and get flats, or bend rims. If you run too much air you will not get the best traction, but that is about it. I run between 12 and 14 depending on the conditions I'm in. If I'm on a track with a lot of square edges and sharp rocks I run 14. In sand and indoor tracks I run 12.

im 5'11 195 Lbs and im wondering what is a good tire presure for soft terrain with a MH3 at my size.

I run 14-15psi with Dunlop 756's front and rear. Seems to work just fine. I'm cautious about going any less this this.:applause::eek:

Are te results of low tire pressure pinch flats? if so what are the cons of too high of pressure, less cushioning?

The more pressure you run the less traction you have. 11 to 14 lbs. in most conditions is about right.

The more pressure you run the less traction you have.
Not entirely true. It applies in a general way, but there's obviously a lower limit to the pressure you can run, for one thing, and there can be circumstances where low pressure isn't the best choice. One is in good traction with hard, high speed corners and a lot of G force. Here, a tire running too low can squirm under the rim, or let the blocks roll onto their sides, reducing traction and making the bike squirrelly. In some other conditions, the soil and tire combination may dictate a firmer tire in order to force the knobs down into the dirt deeper.

On the whole, low pressure is good, but you should experiment, nevertheless.

Not entirely true. It applies in a general way, but there's obviously a lower limit to the pressure you can run, for one thing, and there can be circumstances where low pressure isn't the best choice. One is in good traction with hard, high speed corners and a lot of G force. Here, a tire running too low can squirm under the rim, or let the blocks roll onto their sides, reducing traction and making the bike squirrelly. In some other conditions, the soil and tire combination may dictate a firmer tire in order to force the knobs down into the dirt deeper.

On the whole, low pressure is good, but you should experiment, nevertheless.

As usual, this is solid advice and IMO, very accurate.:applause:

1. How important is it to check/set the correct tire pressure?

The tires not only provide traction, they are also part of the suspension of the bike. It is very important to check for proper inflation before every ride. It is best to check pressures when tires are cold.

2. Should the front and rear always be set to the same pressure?

No, there are normally small differences we suggest on front and rear pressure. A good baseline pressure for each is 12 psi in the front, and 13 psi in the rear. That will work in most conditions.

3. If the area we're riding in goes through big temperature changes, how often throughout the day should tire pressure be checked?

Air expands when it gets hotter. Think of a hot air balloon. The pressure goes up as the tire is run and gets hotter, or if the tire is sitting in the hot sun.

If the tire is sitting for a while after have ridden, you should check the pressure, and if necessary, set it back to the safe margins of 12 psi front and 13 psi rear. If the bike sits for a few hours or temperature drops significantly it should be set again. This is especially important when racing at night, when it is warm in the day and then cools at night during the heats/main events. The temperature can drop by as much as 20 degrees at times.

4. What pressures do you recommend for common racing conditions, such as hard pack, sand, loamy dirt, etc?

Here's a quick general guideline:

Hard pack: 11.5 psi front, 11 psi rear. This would be for normal supercross-type conditions with no rocks or large square edged bumps.

Intermediate: 12 psi front, 13 psi rear.

Sand/Mud: 12 psi front, 10 psi rear. The lower pressure will help get a bite in the sand and slippery wet conditions. If it is rocky and muddy we would not suggest 10 psi in the rear.

5. Do these recommendations apply to motocross tracks and trail riding, or would they differ?

Motocross is a more controlled environment. It is easier to run lower pressures when there are clearly no rocks or large square edged bumps. For off road we normally suggest a little higher pressure to reduce the chance of a flat.

For off road or trail riding suggested pressure would be 13 psi front, and 13.5-14 psi rear. If it is high speed desert terrain with many rocks we would use up to 18 psi on the rear.

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