Soaking chain with kerosene (A NO NO?)

My owners manual says cleaning with kerosene can damage the x-rings on my DID 520VM chain. I didn't read that until after I soaked the thing in kerosene. My question is what have you others experienced and does soaking also remove lube from the rollers inside the x-rings. If so, how do you get lube back in there?

Kerosene can swell up the orings, making it very difficult for oil/grease to get back into the inner part of the chain.........

Check this site out for chain maintenance info!

http://www.chaingang.com.au/maintenance.php

That article is another proponent of using kerosene. I don't know who or what to believe.

I've used kerosene for as long as I can remember. From cleaning my O-ring chains to cleaning my air filters to de-gunking the motor. I continue to use it without any problems.

Once an O-ring chain is sealed at the factory (or by you in the case of the master link), NOTHING is expected to get past the O-rings. That's their job - to seal in the factory lube and keep every thing else out. So, I'm not sure what you mean by:

Kerosene can swell up the orings, making it very difficult for oil/grease to get back into the inner part of the chain.........
. The chain lubes/waxes/oils that we put on O-ring chains is for rust protection, and to a point for the rollers on the chain, and not for the inner parts of the chain that the O-rings are protecting.

I remember the manual for my old Suzuki GSXR said that the o-ring chain should be cleaned with kerosene.

The other reason you lube the chain is to keep the o-rings slipery so they dont self destruct. Once that happens, the chain is not long for this world. (Speaking from experience)

Paul

I use kerosene once the spray-on chain wax build up becomes horrible. Usually every couple of months. My chains all look great. Clean, lube, ride.. lube, ride.. lube, ride... lube, ride...lube, ride... then clean again.

Both Regina Chain and EK Chain recommend cleaning their O-ring chains with Kerosene.

Hose it down with Simple Green and spray it off with a pressure sprayer. Thats what I do. My chain looks like new. All the chains on every thing I have ever had looked like new. The only chains I have ever replaced were the old DID non o-ring chains Dad bought when I was a kid because they were $30. I've never had an o-ring go bad.

Hose it down with Simple Green and spray it off with a pressure sprayer. Thats what I do. My chain looks like new. All the chains on every thing I have ever had looked like new. The only chains I have ever replaced were the old DID non o-ring chains Dad bought when I was a kid because they were $30. I've never had an o-ring go bad.

Looking like new and working like new are not the same thing. When you pressure wash any part of the bike you're forcing alot of dirt into places you don't want it. It looks like new, but all the tight areas are jammed with dirt.

The duface I bought my bike from used a pressure washer and all of the electrical connectors were packed with dirt. When I checked the valves, I noticed dirt almost half way into the head gasket. I'd guess your pressure washing technique is doing a good job of wedging dirt into your chain.

Hasn't hurt any of my stuff. I check my things like you. I guess you didn't read the part where I said that I haven't replaced an o-ring chain. Sorry you have bad luck.

Show me any chain manufacture that recomends using a pressure washer on a chain. If you are careful and stay back a comfortable distance, you might be OK, but.... you are counting on being lucky.

I bought my WR from a guy who used a pressure washer a lot. Got water into the forks, and even inside the rear shock. All the rear suspension linkage bearings were rusted almost solid.

I have used diesel fuel (oilier than kerosene, but cheaper and gives the same reasults) and have not had a problem with the o-rings on any of the chains on the bikes I have owned. I would think that any fuel oil would not be harmful to rubber components, but some of the new x-ring chains may use different materials. I think I am going to pitch the old style sticky chain lubes and start using the lighter film lubricants so I do not have to clean the thing in that stinky crap.:bonk:

Show me any chain manufacture that recomends using a pressure washer on a chain. If you are careful and stay back a comfortable distance, you might be OK, but.... you are counting on being lucky.

I bought my WR from a guy who used a pressure washer a lot. Got water into the forks, and even inside the rear shock. All the rear suspension linkage bearings were rusted almost solid.

Unless you have a pressure washer that will take off paint, a comfortable distance won't put it much harder then a regular water hose that has any pressure. Again, I've used the car wash on everything I've ever owned and they all stay looking and working like new. Anyone who held it close enough to get water in a shock was trying too hard. You and the other guy that said he had problems from pressure washing both bought your bikes used. It sounds like these people just never took care of the bike in the first place. I bought an atv once that needed all new linkage bearing because thy were rusted and bad. I put new ($300 worth) in it and new had another problem. Maybe if you started with a new bike instead of junk you would have a different view.

I guess you didn't read the part where I said that I haven't replaced an o-ring chain.

I read it, but since you didn't verify with how much life you were getting out of a chain, I didn't take much stock in it. An o-ring chain will have a good long life with no care at all unless it lives in sand or swamps. They last 15,000 miles on a 150hp sportbike with no maintenance whatsoever.

And my bike that was powerwashed to kingdom come was operating perfectly when I got it too. It just had some hidden crusty spots.

Maybe if you started with a new bike instead of junk you would have a different view.

And for goodness sakes, be more mindful about calling folk's babies "junk." It's not junk just because an ignorant idiot (albeit, one with good intentions) had at it with a powerwasher. Besides, buying used is a smart decision for anyone who isn't rich. I'll bet two gently used bikes will go alot farther than one new bike that costs the same price. Priorities I guess.

My question is, how much life do you get out of a chain and sprockets? Running Ironman stainless sprockets and a Regina chain, I don't get much more than a season and a half before the sprocket is hooking and about to go on th IR list.....

Just wondering..

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