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Docmarkw

Stock spokes stress question (650R)

3 posts in this topic

I'm planning on replacing my rear hub with another stock hub and plan on using the original spokes. I was told I should replace the spokes because they're most likely stressed.

How do you know when your spokes are stressed? I would think that would mean they have stretched too. The rim has always been in pretty good shape and true, I rarely ever needed to tighten spokes and the spoke nipple has lots of thread showing.

I really don't know if the spoke nipple thread has anything to do with it, but if the spoke has stretched and occasional spoke tightening was needed, I would think the spoke would be at the end of the threads.

I'm trying to keep my cost at a minimum and really could use some advice.

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I'm planning on replacing my rear hub with another stock hub and plan on using the original spokes. I was told I should replace the spokes because they're most likely stressed.

How do you know when your spokes are stressed? I would think that would mean they have stretched too. The rim has always been in pretty good shape and true, I rarely ever needed to tighten spokes and the spoke nipple has lots of thread showing.

I really don't know if the spoke nipple thread has anything to do with it, but if the spoke has stretched and occasional spoke tightening was needed, I would think the spoke would be at the end of the threads.

I'm trying to keep my cost at a minimum and really could use some advice.

It's fine to go with your stock/old spokes. If you were going through rims (bends in the rim) then maybe it would be wise to change but if your wheel is fine then you aren't even close to having a problem.

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My 2000 XRR had stretched spokes. They were bottomed out on the nipples and still loose in places. You don't want this. If your rim is fairly new, then it is probably ok.

If you go with aftermarket, then I here is what I did:

I bought oversized Buchanon spokes. I dismounted the tire. I used a bolt/padlock cutter to clip the stock spokes. Removed the spoke pieces from the rim and hub. Cutting them saves a bunch of time. I then drilled the rim one drill oversized so the new Buchanon nipples would fit.

Now secure your axle vertically in a bench vise. Put your hub on it. Install the spokes in the hub. This is tricky and takes some patience. You have to slightly bend the spokes to force the next one by. I did bottom one direction, then bottom other direction then proceeded up. Moly lube each spoke end on the threads. After that, put the nipples in an accessible spot. If you still have moly lube, the put a dab in the nipple too when you go to install them.

Lace the spokes into the rim holes and make sure the rim holes are the same direction as the spokes. Put some nipples through the rim into the spokes to secure the wheel. You want to get them all finger tight. Jiggle the rim up and down, then make them finger tight again. Repeat. Now use a board or something as a pointer to indicate trueness of the rim.

You can use a cordless drill and tighten the spoke nipples from the outside of the rim. Just don't go past finger tight because you need to start at finger tight. Use the drill to thread the nipples faster and use your fingers for the last few turns.

Place a mark (tape, marker) on the rim at one spoke. This is your start point. Tighten each spoke 1/4 turn. Check trueness. If slightly untrue, adjust the spoke tension slightly to get it true. You want to gradually torque each spoke starting at the start point and ending at the spoke before it. If you get out of trueness, then you need loosen all the spokes and start from finger tight again. Tighten 1/4 turn and repeat, repeat, repeat until you get proper spoke tension. The last couple times through you might need to tighten a few spokes more than others to keep it true. The first time, this took me about 3 hours from taking the wheel off to putting the wheel back on the bike.

Or...you can pay someone $60 to lace your rim.

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