What's the best fork brace? SRC or superbrace

Oops...Here is the pic of the sideview of the RSW brace & the Superbrace.

5903392265.jpg

5903413818.jpg

Other views of a RSW forkbrace fitted on a XR650R. NOTE: The fork boot vent/drain holes should preferably face rearward. I had one of the boots askew, :applause: .

5903514790.jpg

5903514722.jpg

Well, seeing how I followed the instructions, I don't see how I could have installed it wrong.

Are you the expert fork brace installer and can immediatly tell that I installed it wrong? Unless your Scott Summers himself, I'm pretty sure that since I followed the instructions, that I installed it right.

You installed it wrong.......

Thumper with having used both those do you see a huge advantge from the RSW to the other with the price difference also?

Thumper with having used both those do you see a huge advantge from the RSW to the other with the price difference also?

Actually, I have not used both of them. Only the RWS. I was just showing comparative pics of my brace and the Superbrace from another bike. But from what I have learned between the both of them I personally like the RWS better. What each have to offer in features will be more of a personal preference but their basic function is the same. Here is what I can tell you about them in my perspective regarding their features after reading, looking & talking about them and comparing. Much of this can be taken from what has been talked about earlier but I will try to summerize it in one comparative post.

I will also show detailed pics of my fenders and their trimming. This will show the points where the brace has made contact all full hard hit compression and the height relation of the fender sides to the middle 'hump' of both stock and black aftermarket Polisport fender.

The Superbrace is a nicely streamlined unit with rounded edges and has only two pieces that bolt together which is a nice feature. These two pieces sandwich together front to back. The Superbrace rests on top of the lower fork legs by

way of an inner groove to keep it from ever slipping down which is conceptually good. With this in mind, the brace needs and does have a raised lip for the forkboots to clamp onto. The downside is that the forkbrace partially sits over the top of the fork seals with it's additional height of the forkboot lip and creates a sort of 'bowl' that will hold water,dirt, sand, etc.. There are drainage holes at the bottoms of the stock fork boots that normally allow for water and debris to escape but they are somewhat useless after fitting them to the Superbrace. With the Superbrace, the drainage holes appear to have about a 3/8"- 1/2" height over the fork seals which to me is not good, :D.

The RWS is a more squarish unit that has three pieces as you will see in the pics in the previous posts. The RWS brace does not have any provision to hold itself in its position other than the clamps, (nor does the SRC brace for that matter). While this would seem to be a little concerning at first, (which was to me originally) it is very unlikely the brace would come loose enough for this to happen. In the instance of the brace ever bottoming out from a big hit, it might actually cause more friction against the fork legs from the flexing of the brace. (a little more on this sideline subject below)

The RWS brace installs a little lower on the fork leg so that the forkboots can be reinstalled by clamping them on the fork leg itself above the brace clamps. The bottom of the RWS forkbrace lines up with the bottom of the solid full band at the top of the fork legs. With this installation position, it allows enough room for reinstalling the forkboots. It also basicly allows the drainage holes in the forkboots to line up right at the top edge of the fork legs to allow for water and debris to drain and keep from accumulating on the fork seals. (notice my finger pushing in on the fork boot in the previous pics to show how the drainage holes line up with the top edge of the fork leg). This is especially effective as long as the fork boot drain holes are facing rearward, (which they really should be facing anyway).

The maximum center height of the two braces look to be pretty close but the Superbrace might be slightly higher. The inner sides of the RWS brace are higher than the Superbrace because of it's squarely machined profile but the Superbrace might be a little higher in the middle due to the main body having to be installed higher over the fork legs.

With these differences, the RWS will need more side fender trimming to clear the inner sides of the brace than the Superbrace at full compression. As a note, I have never had fender flexing problems with 3 different fenders after trimming the sides for the forkbrace, (2 stock and 1 aftermarket) with how much I trimmed mine.

In the beginning when I had stock soft suspension for my weight there were a few times that I had bottomed out on the fender sides because I had not trimmed it enough to clear the brace. I ended up trimming the fender edges down to 1 1/4" - 1 3/8" in the end. After trimming them to this point, it was much harder to get to the bottoming point. When I was getting into some big hits on the front end from jumps, g-outs and the like, the brace would somewhat lightly hit the trimmed corners, ( 1 3/8" to the top edge of the fender) of where I had trimmed the stock fender. Pics below. I could have trimmed it a bit more in hindsight but never bothered. At a later time when I started using a black aftermarket universal CR fender, I trimmed it more than the stock fender, to 1 1/4" from the the top edge. Pics below. It would lightly hit the fenders sides on BIG suspension hits. After having my suspension rebuilt, it is much less likely to happen as often. Someone [might] get away with trimming the edges down to 1"- 1 1/8" but I can't say whether the fender would start flexing too much or not. I could try it at some point, I guess but don't hold your breath right now, :p .

With the RWS forkbrace profile, the forkbrace will always bottom at the sides of the fender before it can reach the middle 'hump' underneath the fender. The SRC brace should have the same occurance since the top is flat.

With the Superbrace, it is said it will hit the middle hump of the fender even after trimming the sides of the fender. I can't confirm this. If by chance you use a aftermarket fender of any sort that has a shallower hump on the underside of the fender, you will get more travel before any bottoming at the middle will occur with the Superbrace if that is the case. By looking at pics, I would still think the Superbrace would still hit the fender sides before the middle even if they were trimmed, but again, I don't have one. BWB has the Superbrace. He should be able to give more info on that front.

It would be interesting to measure the maximum heights of the two forkbraces to find out how much they differ in that spot.

As far as (my) preference goes, I like the RWS brace better than the others for it's fitment design relating to the placement of the stock fork boots, it's ability to use the stock fork boots for their draining function and of course the big price savings over the Superbrace & SRC brace. Others may have completely different opinions and perspectives between the features of these forkbraces and the reasons why they like the others. One thing is evident, they will all work for the simple purpose of lessening fork flex and giving more precise steering.

Note: I don't think the SRC brace can work with the stock forkboots because of the rubber fork wipers it installs with. If you want fork tube protection you have to use their fork guard system or neoprene mudskin fork seal savers.

This brings me to another subject,..

Regarding Neoprene fork covers, I am not a fan of them, :bonk: . The reason? They are supposed to be waterproof but once they are nicked up from roosted rocks, unexpected bike dumps, crashes and such,.. so much for that feature. I have seen them gouged up from crashes where they get damaged from bushes, branches or rocks.

Conceptually, they would do well to use over the Superbrace brand of forkbrace so that water and debris couldn't get inside and accumulate over the fork seals. But again, If they get nicked or ripped near the area of the fork seals, all bets are off. Highly unlikely in some riding areas in the dry bushless areas of the desert , yes. In other areas where there are more poky things, no. Also consider flying roosted rocks no matter where you ride.

To my thinking, the damaged neoprene could contribute to additional water and grime retention on the dust seals, especially after washing the bike. :p .

With the SRC forkbrace/forkguard system, the neoprene fork tube covers can at least be protected at the front to keep from getting nicked up by roosted rocks. The SRC brace is also expensive and even more so when adding the fork guards and/or neoprene, :bonk: You can say that it appears I am steering you to a RWS, :naughty:, but only because of the things I see between these braces and what (I) prefer, :p .

I think I have covered alot more than you expected. My intent was to make clear a few of the feature differences of these forkbraces. This should allow you or anyone else to make a better overall decision for yourself on which one you may prefer and what it takes to accomodate & use one effectively.

8420303227.jpg

8420303393.jpg

8420303319.jpg

8420303481.jpg

8420303450.jpg

8420303550.jpg

8420303585.jpg

I love the SRC with the guards but i was really thinkin the RSW for my first dual sport i have ridden MX for 20 years so i still have an offroad bike this will primarly be street and dirt when i take it hunting not gonna jump and thrash on it so i think i might start with the RSW since its cheapest and will do the job Thanks for all the info and pics WHEW like reading a novel LOL good info

With regards to a 650R this is a safety issue so I'll post.

If the postee is using a brace bought from Ron Wallace @ RSW racing, there's no way the stock fork boots can be used if riding is any more aggresive than say, grandma mode. Don't pay attention to the website claims.

For kicks, do this to see how the boot limits fork travel if using a brace. Loosen the screw on the lower boot clamp and compress the boot up against the lower triple clamp. You'll find it only compresses so much and binds way before the brace gets close to the fender hump. The danger being that on the big hit (for a grandma) the boot shoves the brace down onto the tire, a rock wedges between the brace / knobs and.............

I've got a RSW brace. Use either Seal Savers, nothing or perhaps aan aftermarket boot that won't bind.

You installed it wrong.......

Oh thank you, mr benevolent know-it-all....

Oh thank you, mr benevolent know-it-all....

But, he is right, it was installed wrong:bonk: :bonk: or it was the wrong brace:excuseme:

well i never, my src ok looks good aswell

I love the SRC with the guards but i was really thinkin the RSW for my first dual sport i have ridden MX for 20 years so i still have an offroad bike this will primarly be street and dirt when i take it hunting not gonna jump and thrash on it so i think i might start with the RSW since its cheapest and will do the job Thanks for all the info and pics WHEW like reading a novel LOL good info

Glad to help. Heh, sorry if it was a bit much for you. Just trying to give good info base, :bonk:.

With regards to a 650R this is a safety issue so I'll post.

If the postee is using a brace bought from Ron Wallace @ RSW racing, there's no way the stock fork boots can be used if riding is any more aggresive than say, grandma mode. Don't pay attention to the website claims.

For kicks, do this to see how the boot limits fork travel if using a brace. Loosen the screw on the lower boot clamp and compress the boot up against the lower triple clamp. You'll find it only compresses so much and binds way before the brace gets close to the fender hump. The danger being that on the big hit (for a grandma) the boot shoves the brace down onto the tire, a rock wedges between the brace / knobs and.............

I've got a RSW brace. Use either Seal Savers, nothing or perhaps aan aftermarket boot that won't bind.

Alright then,...

While it does appear that the stock fork boots don't collapse enough when doing it manually, you can see in the pics of the fenders and read that the forkbrace will still hit the trimmed fender side edges when you jump pretty big or g-out on large drop offs and such. The boots either fold over themselves or do 'something' for this to happen. You will notice that the brace has contacted the trimmed fender edges where the brace is only 1/2" from the fender hump of the stock fender. So, the stock boots allow at least this much compression.

As far as the resistance the stock forkboot causes against the forkbrace, it's hard to say. I have been riding like this for awhile now. Even when I ride outside the "grandma" zone, as you put it, :bonk:

One thing though, I have never heard of or seen front tire knobbies grab up and hold a large rock that could effectively get lodged between the tire and brace causing the front wheel to stop, especially against the moving weight of a bike. That is a dreamwork if you ask me, :naughty::D:bonk: .

Oh thank you, mr benevolent know-it-all....

be·nev·o·lent - Show Spelled Pronunciation[buh-nev-uh-luhnt] Pronunciation Key -

–adjective 1. characterized by or expressing goodwill or kindly feelings: a benevolent attitude; her benevolent smile.

2. desiring to help others; charitable: gifts from several benevolent alumni.

3. intended for benefits rather than profit: a benevolent institution.

.......................:bonk: .....You installed it wrong....Thanks BTW.......No harm just trying to help bud.....

Alright then,...

While it does appear that the stock fork boots don't collapse enough when doing it manually, you can see in the pics of the fenders and read that the forkbrace will still hit the trimmed fender side edges when you jump pretty big or g-out on large drop offs and such. The boots either fold over themselves or do 'something' for this to happen. You will notice that the brace has contacted the trimmed fender edges where the brace is only 1/2" from the fender hump of the stock fender. So, the stock boots allow at least this much compression.

As far as the resistance the stock forkboot causes against the forkbrace, it's hard to say. I have been riding like this for awhile now. Even when I ride outside the "grandma" zone, as you put it, :bonk:

One thing though, I have never heard of or seen front tire knobbies grab up and hold a large rock that could effectively get lodged between the tire and brace causing the front wheel to stop, especially against the moving weight of a bike. That is a dreamwork if you ask me, :naughty::D:bonk: .

Jeeez.............

Obviously the fender sides must be trimmed, but the brace won't hit the fender hump with the stock boots, they bind first. If grandma hits hard enough, the brace can be forced into the tire and stay there. Especially if grandma has her forks up in the triple clamps to make it turn. It's happened. How long have you been around bikes?

No one care's what you've heard or seen and what you dream of is irrelent. You shouldn't (well maybe you should) use the stock boots with the brace. Now grow up and get over it.

Jeeez.............

Obviously the fender sides must be trimmed, but the brace won't hit the fender hump with the stock boots, they bind first. If grandma hits hard enough, the brace can be forced into the tire and stay there. Especially if grandma has her forks up in the triple clamps to make it turn. It's happened. How long have you been around bikes?

No one care's what you've heard or seen and what you dream of is irrelent. You shouldn't (well maybe you should) use the stock boots with the brace. Now grow up and get over it.

In the beginning of my response, it was just a hinted acknowledgement that you sound a bit harsh in your aproach but didn't you see the (:bonk:) at the end of my message? As name calling as your previous post sounded, I was taking it in stride and was making fun of us so called "grandmas'" out there with some sarcasm. I then merely made the point that the stock fork boots do allow the brace to get much closer than what you claimed it would allow regardless of any pressure from the boots collapsing on themselves. I did acknowledge some possibility of a brace maybe being able to be forced from a BIG hit if it was not rock solid on there. The rock quip was way out there, you have to admit, so I made a funny about it. :bonk::naughty: Come-on, let's not get all bound up about it, :D.

Jeeez.............

Obviously the fender sides must be trimmed, but the brace won't hit the fender hump with the stock boots, they bind first. If grandma hits hard enough, the brace can be forced into the tire and stay there. Especially if grandma has her forks up in the triple clamps to make it turn. It's happened. How long have you been around bikes?

No one care's what you've heard or seen and what you dream of is irrelent. You shouldn't (well maybe you should) use the stock boots with the brace. Now grow up and get over it.

One of the nice things about the Superbrace is that you don't have to trim the fender sides as much as the others. It does hit the center hump in the fender when bottoming out the forks. This takes up some of the shock instead of the bottoming cone in the forks. The Superbrace is a two piece design and does clamp just as hard or better then the others. The water sitting in top of the forks is a bunk assumtion, same depth to the seals with no fork brace. I have had the fork skins on for a year and have had them off last month with nothing under them or getting in them to rest onto of the seals like stock boots allow.

I've had my skins on for three years and no problems................Ever.........

BWB, it would be interesting to see a birds eye view of the Superbrace installed on the forks with the fork tube covers pulled up. Any chance of taking a pic or two and posting them? By looking at the position the superbrace is installed at in the pictures and the thickness/height of the brace and it's fork boot lip, it appears to be higher than the top edge of the lower fork leg. My statements were based off the external dimensions that can be seen in a pic of your brace and info we were comparing earlier in this thread. I will admit after seeing what you just wrote, the external pic of the Superbrace could have been deceiving, so it would be great to see a pic without a boot attached for a good internal visual reference for us all. Thanks, :bonk: .

So, far I have heard nothing but, the rantings of unsubstanciated fears. All based on the difference of the one fork brace you bought compared to the ones you have never installed or tried. My point is there is a space that will hold dirt, water, what ever with no brace on at all. I have worked on tons of stock forks and cleaned this stuff out. Fork skins keep 100% on this stuff out till they are in need of changing. Like anything when racing a bike you need to maintian what wears out. If the fork skins become fauly I would buy new ones. I have spent hours measuring and using these brace's and find there are some differences. I found the RWS (first, because of low price) to be the worst design for me. The front fender became much to week after trimming for the brace to be installed at the propper height on the fork (near the top of the lower tube), which it sounds like you choise to mount it lower. Yes, with the superbrace fork brace installed I lost a little complete travel because the top of the brace hits the hump under the stock front fender (I don't run a stock front fender with the hump) but, this turned out to be a good thing. It stops the forks from hitting metal to metal when I bottom very hard over clearing a 55' table top and hitting flat at 70'. The plasic hump acted like a little shock as it gave to the pressure. I also do not need to trim the front fender half as much and have lots of room between the tire and the brace. The RWS just shattered the front fender into pieces and was pushed down a little. You bought you RWS and are real happy and that is good that you think it is the best, makes it worth the money you spent. I didn't think it was good enough for my bike so, I looked elsewhere and found what I liked, this is Rich:p

BWB, it would be interesting to see a birds eye view of the Superbrace installed on the forks with the fork tube covers pulled up. Any chance of taking a pic or two and posting them? By looking at the position the superbrace is installed at in the pictures and the thickness/height of the brace and it's fork boot lip, it appears to be higher than the top edge of the lower fork leg. My statements were based off the external dimensions that can be seen in a pic of your brace and info we were comparing earlier in this thread. I will admit after seeing what you just wrote, the external pic of the Superbrace could have been deceiving, so it would be great to see a pic without a boot attached for a good internal visual reference for us all. Thanks, :bonk: .

:p I "prefer" the RWS but as I stated earlier I won't claim it is the 'best'. Different strokes for different folks in some cases...

Neoprene guards: I have seen what I have seen and have merely stated it. Hey, I realize a few guys have had good luck and experience with them wherever they may ride. I am not trying to argue that they suck or anything. I am just stating a different point of view from what I have seen and don't care for them myself. :naughty::D I like the ruggedness of the stock boots myself, even as old fashioned as they look. :bonk:

As for the install height of the RWS brace, if you don't remember, it could really benefit to be installed at the lowest part of the solid ring of the lower fork leg. This gives it room for clamping the fork boot securely and again, it allows the drain holes of the boot to line up with the lower fork legs rim. If someone decides to install it a little higher, the drainage holes will be higher than the edge. I personally don't want that to be the case. The pic below will show the clamping area for the boot,(with the boot pulled up) with the RWS brace positioned where I am refering to. My forks are off since I am currently doing other work on my bike.

As for the issue of having some loss in suspension stroke with a brace fitted, even after fully trimming the fender, admittedly that has always bothered me a little. In alot of the tighter going in terrain where there are more obstacles, deep ruts, rock beds, etc., the brace allowed better tracking. If I was riding solely in more open fast terrain most of the time, I would not have kept it on. There have been times where I thought of taking it off for a particular ride but just decided to leave it on because I didn't want to mess with it. I may decide to leave it off from time to time though, depending where and what I am doing on the bike. :bonk:

8822474749.jpg

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now