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99yz400

Need tips for storing a Yz400F !

11 posts in this topic

Hi everyone, about three weeks ago, I sold my CR125 and I bought a 1999 Yz400.I'm so happy with my purchase but unfortunately,:worthy: I didn't have the chance to ride it since I needed to repair the left radiator. I live in a place where winter is cold (very cold), so I need to store the bike for about 4 months. I have always maintained my CR really well and I will treat my Yamaha the same way.

The four-stroke world is totally new to me. I'd like to know what are the proper procedures for storing a 4-stroke bike? Is it different from a 2-stroke?

Moreover, what are the maintenace "rules" I should do for normal usage ? (Oil change = what interval, Oil filter = Replace it or clean it, etc) In summary, are there any important thing I should know as a 4-stroke newbie?

:D

I appreciate all your advices

Thanks!

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if your storing it for a long period of time i would definately clean the hell out of the entire bike, make sure there is no dirt or mud in any little crevaces.. drain all the gas out of the tank and the carb. also put it on a stand to take the weight off the suspension. i would also reccomend starting it and letting it run from time to time. and whenever you change the oil make sure to use a new filter each time dont clean it and re use it. i cant think of much else at the time.. some people put a plastic bag over the air filter during storage also.

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i'd suggest maybe running some quickclean through your bike on the last tank to get some of the gunk out of the carb and engine. Then drain the gas and run it out. Maybe also concider covering it

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before u run it why not put in some fuel stableizer so some is in any gas that may be left in the carb. then when u get it back out the carb wont be all gunked up with old gas

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i'd suggest maybe running some quickclean through your bike on the last tank to get some of the gunk out of the carb and engine. Then drain the gas and run it out. Maybe also concider covering it

If you cover it, make sure it's just a dust cover, and that it can "breathe". You don't want stale air trapping moisture underneath the cover, that'll yield corrosion and oxidation.

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I too store my bike over winter, atleast for 3 months or so. This is what I do and I haven't had any problems:

Drain the gas tank and carb bowl.

Make sure its full of oil and brake fluid.

Clean it, but make sure its dry. I even go as far as wiping it down with WD-40 , especially the chain (I don't use WD-40 as a lubricant here, just for Water Displacement).

Lube the cables (also to make sure their is no water in there).

Stuff the airbox FULL w/ rags (slightly used rags, so they smell of oil) to keep the mice/rats/vermin' out.

Lastly, and I don't know if this is really needed. I remove the spark plug, put the piston at bottom dead center and fog the cylinder w/ (snowmobile) fogging oil. Since I do it for my snowmobile, I figgured it couldn't hurt. When its time to start her back up, I start it with my old plug, that may fowl, then I put in my new one for the season.

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Just a caution on the use of WD40 as a rust deterrent: it doesn't work.

It's a pretty good moisture dispersant, which is what it was made to do, and it will prevent rust in the short term. But it has so much solvent, and so little actual oil in it that it has a tendency to vanish after a while, leaving the metal unprotected.

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Just a caution on the use of WD40 as a rust deterrent: it doesn't work.

It's a pretty good moisture dispersant, which is what it was made to do, and it will prevent rust in the short term. But it has so much solvent, and so little actual oil in it that it has a tendency to vanish after a while, leaving the metal unprotected.

Sure. I agree. :worthy: I use it just to 'dry' the places I can't reach...kinda polishes it up a little too. WD-40 should be used like a cleaner, not a lubricant...although I don't want to start that debate up again!:D

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These guys all reccomended good storing tips.

My bike is currently being stored at my home in Las Vegas while I'm on duty in Florida for the Navy. I've been here almost four months, so when I go back to Vegas in a few weeks I am going to take the bike out again and recirculate everything, and ride it everyday! I have a list written by MXA on my computer of exactly what you want to do if ever storing a bike for longer than 6 months at a time if you want to look at that. It's pretty detailed. I'm going to follow it for when I go on 6-9 month deployments to the middle east with my ship.

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