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xrmarty

special oil for generator?

16 posts in this topic

This may belong in Trucks and Trailers forum, but I thought I'd get more bites in this forum.

What kind of oil do you use in your generator? Regular automotive 10W-30 will work?

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I use Mobil 1 in mine, but any automotive rated 10w30 oil should be OK.

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I use Rotella 15W40 in everything. Lawn mower, pressure washer, generator, YZF's, ect...

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This may belong in Trucks and Trailers forum, but I thought I'd get more bites in this forum.

What kind of oil do you use in your generator? Regular automotive 10W-30 will work?

If the engine is a flathead, straight 30 weight, if its an overhead valve, use a multi viscosity, ie 10-40 or 10-30 if ambeint temps are cooler.

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I work for Generac Power Systems as generator technician and for our engines they say that if you use dino oil that you should run 10w-30 in the summer and 5w-30 in the winter but if you use synthetic you can run 5w-30 year 'round.

I wouldnt run anything thicker than 10w-30. All you are doing with thicker oils is making the engine work harder than it has to.

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Mobile 1 Synthetic in all my engines. :worthy:

(After recommended break in of course)

I've always done the lighter weight in winter, heavier in summer.

For emergency generator I use heavy oil, because of the constant load on motor and the constant running of it for long periods of time. (when house elec. goes out due to ice storm) Plus the fact that they are air cooled.

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Our generators use 1000cc air-cooled OHV V-twins. Ive worked there for 5 years and very, VERY few of our engines fail.

Not trying to discredit anyone else, but you really dont need anything thicker than 10w-30.

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Our generators use 1000cc air-cooled OHV V-twins. Ive worked there for 5 years and very, VERY few of our engines fail.

Not trying to discredit anyone else, but you really dont need anything thicker than 10w-30.

No sweat here my friend. :worthy:

Like so many things in life it's all about lifes experiences :D

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For emergency generator I use heavy oil, because of the constant load on motor and the constant running of it for long periods of time. (when house elec. goes out due to ice storm) Plus the fact that they are air cooled.

The need for heavier oil in modern engines is negated by much closer tolerances, materials used, and oil technology.

It seemed strange to me that oil such as 5w30 exists but it causes less start up wear and protects just as well under heavy load and high rpm. Most engine wear now occurs at startup and immediately after versus running wear. This is why 5w/30 and 10w/30 is recommended by most manufacturers.

Things change, many times our experiences no longer hold true.

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No sweat here my friend. :worthy:

Like so many things in life it's all about lifes experiences :D

I just didnt want to come off like I think I know it all and everyone else is talking out of their you know what.

Its my job to run the generators when they reach the end of the line and if they dont work, figure out whats wrong, fix it on the line if its a simple repair and if its not send it out to get fixed (which isnt often). Ive also worked in the service dept a few times fixing units that need warranty work done. Needless to say, I know a thing or 2 about how generators work. :prof:

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The need for heavier oil in modern engines is negated by much closer tolerances, materials used, and oil technology.

It seemed strange to me that oil such as 5w30 exists but it causes less start up wear and protects just as well under heavy load and high rpm. Most engine wear now occurs at startup and immediately after versus running wear. This is why 5w/30 and 10w/30 is recommended by most manufacturers.

Things change, many times our experiences no longer hold true.

You forgot 1 other reason: lower emissions. They can run a thinner oil and get low emissions without making any real changes to the engine.

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It's just a generator. :worthy: Whatever is on hand 10w30, 15w40 or 30wt.

I forget what the book calls for but it's something like that.

EU2K.

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It's just a generator. :worthy: Whatever is on hand 10w30, 15w40 or 30wt.

I forget what the book calls for but it's something like that.

EU2K.

Yeah right. Oil is oil, right? :D Id hate to buy anything that youve owned.

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I've always done the lighter weight in winter, heavier in summer.

For emergency generator I use heavy oil, because of the constant load on motor and the constant running of it for long periods of time. (when house elec. goes out due to ice storm) Plus the fact that they are air cooled.

If your gen. is air cooled in an ice storm, wouldn't that be cold air cooling? Surely plenty of cold air to run {the lighter weight oil} :worthy:

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