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djtroy

New 2006 yz 450f owner here

14 posts in this topic

I just signed the papers to my 06 450. I have never ridden a 450 4 stroke before but I have raced motocross since I was 16. I am 34 now. I was wondering if you guys had any advice for me as I am having the previous owner go over the bike for me before he ships it down. Is there anything he should do for me before he sends it? Hes the owner of a shop so he has access to all the parts and things for this bike. Hows the jetting I am in south Florida. How about the suspension settings I am 210lbs fast c or b class rider. He told me he is doing some carb mod that actually shoots the fuel in much faster and is supposed to really increase the throttle response on this thing. Any tips at on on this bike would be VERY helpful.

Thanks in advance for the advice.

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New handlebars would be in order if you are taller than 5'7.

Ya it already has new bars on it. Im not sure what bend though. Im 5,10 average height.

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Ride the piss out of it and change the oil often. Make adjustments as needed and not by advice from others.

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Grease the steering stem, suspension linkage. I would increase the pilot jet to 45 (42 is stock), might even consider moving to a 48 on really cold days in Florida. The stock main jet is a 165. I went up to a 170 myself but live in a much cooler enviroment. Jetting is such a local condition specific thing.

The fork seals on this bike are very high performance and have a tendency to leak if they aren't kept clean. Debris or dirt stuck on the slider portion of the forks can create this problem fairly easily. I would get a set of seal savers.

I raced a full season on my special edition model and never felt the need for an accelerator pump mod (it sounds like this is what he is trying to do to your bike). The bike has excellent power and response once the jetting is sorted.

Mainly, you should get the bike to fit you ergonomically (like the guys are saying with the bars) and then work on getting the suspension dialed. Set the sag and start with the standard clicker settings. Adjust accordingly to your needs on each particular track. Stock spring rates should be pretty good for you though you could go up a size stiffer and it may perform better. That titanium rear spring is pricey to replace unless you go with a steel spring.

Congrats on your purchase. It is one heck of a bike!

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Someone always misses this: Throw the chain away before it eats your sprockets or worse. The stocker is not up to par. I recommend a Regina ORN6

Also, if you adjust it to spec, it will look loose. That is how it should be. It looks looser than others because the lower roller is lower than most, and doesn't bear on the chain as much when the wheel is extended. Don't be tempted to over tighten it.

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Richen the pilot to a 48 and go bigger on the main jet two sizes. Toss the original fuel mixture screw and put in a Zipty external adjusting screw. Bleed the air out of the forks after every ride, you may get a clunk noise if you dont. Toss the chain and get a good quality chain. Anything is better than the stock chain. Change the oil and filter often. Flush the coolant and put in a good quality coolant like Engine Ice.

Take care of the bike and it will take of you. Have fun.

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Richen the pilot to a 48 and go bigger on the main jet two sizes. Toss the original fuel mixture screw and put in a Zipty external adjusting screw. Bleed the air out of the forks after every ride, you may get a clunk noise if you dont. Toss the chain and get a good quality chain. Anything is better than the stock chain. Change the oil and filter often. Flush the coolant and put in a good quality coolant like Engine Ice.

Take care of the bike and it will take of you. Have fun.

I should richen the main jet and pilot even though its pretty hot in Florida?

Awesome advice on the other issues man, thanks.

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Grease the steering stem, suspension linkage. I would increase the pilot jet to 45 (42 is stock), might even consider moving to a 48 on really cold days in Florida. The stock main jet is a 165. I went up to a 170 myself but live in a much cooler enviroment. Jetting is such a local condition specific thing.

The fork seals on this bike are very high performance and have a tendency to leak if they aren't kept clean. Debris or dirt stuck on the slider portion of the forks can create this problem fairly easily. I would get a set of seal savers.

I raced a full season on my special edition model and never felt the need for an accelerator pump mod (it sounds like this is what he is trying to do to your bike). The bike has excellent power and response once the jetting is sorted.

Mainly, you should get the bike to fit you ergonomically (like the guys are saying with the bars) and then work on getting the suspension dialed. Set the sag and start with the standard clicker settings. Adjust accordingly to your needs on each particular track. Stock spring rates should be pretty good for you though you could go up a size stiffer and it may perform better. That titanium rear spring is pricey to replace unless you go with a steel spring.

Congrats on your purchase. It is one heck of a bike!

Yes I do believe it is the accelerator pump mod. What are the negative aspects of doing this? He said they have to drill a hole in something and wire tie something down in the carb. I don't know if this is what a accelerator mod is but thats what I think they are going to do.

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Someone always misses this: Throw the chain away before it eats your sprockets or worse. The stocker is not up to par. I recommend a Regina ORN6

Also, if you adjust it to spec, it will look loose. That is how it should be. It looks looser than others because the lower roller is lower than most, and doesn't bear on the chain as much when the wheel is extended. Don't be tempted to over tighten it.

It's easily overlooked for scrapping the chain for most of us is as given as putting gas in the tank :cheers:

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It's easily overlooked for scrapping the chain for most of us is as given as putting gas in the tank :cheers:

O ring or regular?

Do I need sprockets too, it has about 10 rides on it.

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The sprockets are fine as long as the OEM chain doesn't grow a foot and destroy them. If they don't show any serious wear, use them.

The ORN6 is an O-ring chain. It's reasonably light, free running, and inexpensive. The one on my '03 is over two years old, too. (your results may vary, etc.)

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The first thing I had to do when I bought my 2006 YZ450F was put a stonger chain on it, factory chain was weak.
"weak" doesn't come close, I'm afraid.

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