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Brent McCabe

Lefty's

8 posts in this topic

When I land after a jump, I'm having trouble letting go of the throttle and as I come down, alot of times, my right foot hits the rear brake hard. I'm wondering if this is a problem because my right-side is not as conditioned as my left, or if it's just a problem because I've only been riding a few months now. Any other "lefty's" out there that have found it dificult to adjust to the right-side being in control? Thank you

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you just gotta get used to it.

when you land after a jump, you should be on the gas. If you are not on the gas, then the engine braking may try to put your body over the bars once the rear wheel hits the ground. That's not what you want. (ask me how I know....)

Regarding the rear brake... keep your foot away from it. Again, those tires need to be moving when you hit the ground. You can brake after wards. Keep you foot centered on the pegs and you shouldn't be able to touch the brake.

A couple of really good crashes cured me of both of these problems.

Good luck.

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That is exactly what happens! It tries to throw me over the bars. My problem with the throttle is that I roll it hard, accidentally (uncontrolably). When I fixate myself on the throttle then other accidental things happen (apply the rear brake hard, accidental gear shift, push the nose of the bike down, etc...). I'm very new at this and am trying to learn some disciplining techniques. Thank you

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Lefty back at you!

I Dont think left or right has anything to do with it. A little advice for learning your bike. Think before you do and dont get in over your head. Only do what is exactly within your control until you have perfected - or at least are very comfortable with what you are doing. Find a place you can ride unobstructed and practice breaking and throttling over and over (start - stop,start - stop, etc.). Once mastering this, then go approxim. 20 mph a hit your rear brake at the same time you turn your front wheel and lean into it. The idea is to get your rear tire skidding out. After mastering this right and left, then do it and give it gas and spin out of it. Do this over and over. This will all help you get your muscles and your hand, eye coordination working together. Do figure eights. Find another rider who will be patient with you and you follow him and copy him and ask him questions why, when and how do do it all. Stay safe, Jason

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I still occassionally have the same problem and I am right handed. Try thinking about what you want to do and visulaize where your feet should be and how your hands should feel on the handle bars. Take one jump at a time and stop and repeat the process above before the next jump. It will seem ridiculous at first but helped me quite a bit. As a beginner there is a lot to think about while going as fast and jumping as high as you do on a motorcycle, all while hoping you don't kill yourself on the landing! :cheers: Like I said, don't try to master the whole track or trail at one time take one jump or one section at a time and picture where you want to end up in your head.

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Lefty back at you!

I Dont think left or right has anything to do with it. A little advice for learning your bike. Think before you do and dont get in over your head. Only do what is exactly within your control until you have perfected - or at least are very comfortable with what you are doing. Find a place you can ride unobstructed and practice breaking and throttling over and over (start - stop,start - stop, etc.). Once mastering this, then go approxim. 20 mph a hit your rear brake at the same time you turn your front wheel and lean into it. The idea is to get your rear tire skidding out. After mastering this right and left, then do it and give it gas and spin out of it. Do this over and over. This will all help you get your muscles and your hand, eye coordination working together. Do figure eights. Find another rider who will be patient with you and you follow him and copy him and ask him questions why, when and how do do it all. Stay safe, Jason

I agree with Jason, do not try to make your learning curve too steep.

It is hard to learn while you are injured.

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Rolling on the throttle means you're dropping your elbows when your landing. Practice good body position and this will be much easier.

Another trick that I like is: use the two fingers you have covering the front brake as a guide to how much throttle you're applying. Use the leverage against the brake lever to stabalize your throtlle position. Works good everywhere and no one can say covering the brake is a bad idea.

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