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motochris

Waterproofing the 650R

10 posts in this topic

With all the rains and flooding in Baja, we want to be sure our 650R is going to handle all the water crossings well. (supposed to be 100+ crossings!) Since we are all from the desert....waterproofing isn't a normal thing for us. Who got the tried and true for the XR650R waterproofing?

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The bike comes rather water resistant, but there are things that you can do. There are two categories. First is not drawing warer into the engine. The main thing here are extra holes in the airbox. The extra holes need to be covered up. Sinse they are lower than the main air entry, they can suck in water. Second is keeping the water out of the various bearings. Wheel bearings, swingarm, and head tube. The basic plan it to totally fill everything with grease so water has no place to go. I've seen bikes with a zerk fitting on the head tube so it could be filled up all the way with grease. These are mostly long term corrosion prevention. For one trip you could just clean and regrease everything when you return.

I have had some other kind of strange water issues before. Once I had water sucked up through the vent tube of the gas tank. This was in Afton canyon. Who says we don't have water in our deserts. It got into the main jet of the carb and stopped any gas flow through it. I had to put the tank on reserve and drain a little gas out. Ditto for the carb. To get teh water out of the main jet it took a little blast of carb cleaner.

You should also be prepared for a drowned bike. Depending on what happens it might be a simple as wringing out the air filter, pulling the plug and turning the engine over to get the water out. It may be more difficult like replacing the oil. You just need a plan for when it happens.

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re grease the steering head bearings and all the suspension pivots {with goo d waterproof grease} before you go and when you get back........

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I'm not worried about things like the bearings and such getting wet. More with drowning the thing in a water crossing. We have removed the vented side panel and replaced with a stocker, siliconed the plug wire and around the stator wire exit, T-de all carb vent lines.......what am I missing?

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Put dielectric grease in all electrical connections including the spark plug cap. Put a T in each of the carb vent hoses, run another piece of hose up high and into the top of the airbox or up under the gas tank. This keeps water from being pulled up through the vents and into the carb. Will also keep the bike from stalling when in deep water.

Cross deep water in 1st gear fairly slow but keep the RPM's high by using the clutch. Create a small wake with the front tire so the water around the motor will be pulled away by the wake.

This is what I do on all my bikes here in KY where we have lots of water crossings. This is my Transalp on one of the more mild crossings, no problems at all with these simple preventions.

18865801-M-1.jpg

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This will not help with a drowning but is good general maintenance, imho: on any bike I acquire I always go through the electrical wiring, pull apart any connectors and spray them down with a good silicone spray. I currently use a can of DuPont Teflon/Silicone spray lubricant.

Like I said, it won't necessarily prevent shorts in a drowning but it will help prevent opens due to the contacts corroding over time, when there's moisture present. I have those kind of corrosion-shorts before and they can be a real bear trying to trouble-shoot.

"An once of prevention...", like they say.

Good luck in any case. Have a good time!:mad:

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Put dielectric grease in all electrical connections including the spark plug cap. Put a T in each of the carb vent hoses, run another piece of hose up high and into the top of the airbox or up under the gas tank. This keeps water from being pulled up through the vents and into the carb. Will also keep the bike from stalling when in deep water.

Cross deep water in 1st gear fairly slow but keep the RPM's high by using the clutch. Create a small wake with the front tire so the water around the motor will be pulled away by the wake.

This is what I do on all my bikes here in KY where we have lots of water crossings. This is my Transalp on one of the more mild crossings, no problems at all with these simple preventions.

18865801-M-1.jpg

Ahhhh yes, forgot about the dielecric grease. Thanks Jeff. Nice watercrossing pic!

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