tmrider

Pics of your 06-09 yzf 450

275 posts in this topic

Gray the bandaid comment wasn't aimed at you at all. I know a few people who kept stalling their bike so they got rekluse to "fix" that. I might have a different taste in my mouth had I gone with the Core instead of the z start as far as clutch feel. As far as switchbacks I usually don't have a problem, but I'm not a pro!

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Gray the bandaid comment wasn't aimed at you at all. I know a few people who kept stalling their bike so they got rekluse to "fix" that. I might have a different taste in my mouth had I gone with the Core instead of the z start as far as clutch feel. As far as switchbacks I usually don't have a problem, but I'm not a pro!

 What do you mean clutch feel?

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He means how the lever effort feels compared to stock.  The ZSP has an extremely light feel (something I like), whereas the Core EXP is reasonably "normal".

 

BTW, I'm going to be exporting this whole discussion into its own topic, as I just realized we're all of us clogging up a pictures only thread.  :naughty: 

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Ok and that's what I thought he meant. If a light clutch lever is a bad thing why do they make so many hydrolic clutches? KTM is one of the biggest manufactures and they mostly have hydrolic clutches and you don't see too many people complaining about it besides automaticly adjusting so you can't feel it being burnt up.

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The problem with lever feel is that there are two kinds of auto clutch users, one who let the clutch do all the work, the way it's intended to be used, and set up the clutch to do what they want, and those who set the clutch up only as an anti-stall device, keeping the engagement rate fast and the engagement point low, then trying to manage the clutch manually with the lever.  Doing the latter rarely works out to the satisfaction of the rider, mostly because it sets up a conflict between the rider and the clutch, with the rider doing one thing while the clutch tries to do something else.  It's more difficult to do with the ZSP because there's so little feedback in the lever, and because the perceived free play keeps moving around within the range of RPM that the clutch engages in.

 

I know one guy who makes manual overide of the Z-Start Pro work for him, but only one.

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The problem with lever feel is that there are two kinds of auto clutch users, one who let the clutch do all the work, the way it's intended to be used, and set up the clutch to do what they want, and those who set the clutch up only as an anti-stall device, keeping the engagement rate fast and the engagement point low, then trying to manage the clutch manually with the lever.  Doing the latter rarely works out to the satisfaction of the rider, mostly because it sets up a conflict between the rider and the clutch, with the rider doing one thing while the clutch tries to do something else.  It's more difficult to do with the ZSP because there's so little feedback in the lever, and because the perceived free play keeps moving around within the range of RPM that the clutch engages in.

 

I know one guy who makes manual overide of the Z-Start Pro work for him, but only one.

 

I'm not claiming to be a hero here or any thing but I fall into the second slot as well. I was seriously thinking of switching to a EXP over my ZSP but with a few hours of practice I have pretty much nailed it the majority of the time. I have gotten to the point where every time I ride I find my self using the clutch lever more and more. I have been struggling with inconsistency in rutted flat sand corners I.E like in deep desert canyons with water falls. This past weekend I was experimenting with pulling in the clutch to force it to freewheel as I began the turn and transited off the breaks near the apex, blasting the corner with higher rpms and I had more consistent results. I also manually modulate the clutch climbing nasty rocky hills and or ledges and have much better success in carrying momentum and control into the next section then I do if I let the ZSP do it all or me. As far as large sand dunes or hills with little run up I manually abuse the heck out of it as well or I flat out would not make it up a few I regularly ride. The reason I'm keeping it on the bike at this point is when I screw up 7 times out of 10 it keeps me moving forwards and that is my only concern in a race. Any thing that can save me 30 seconds 4-?? times a race really adds up. Also it has done a great job at keeping me from over heating my clutch and allows more fade before getting to the point you need to adjust the perch to continue on until it cools off. For the record my buddy rides an 08 with the exp 2.0 and I have an 09 with the ZSP we both run the recommended settings and we both feel this technique allows us to ride faster and more consistent over the terrain we like to ride and especially race on. That is my 2 cents on it for what its worth.

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Installed a Supersprox 13t front, TAG black 49t rear and new Regina ORN-6 chain on the 09 this morning then went riding with my brother. I like the Regina chain a lot. It's quiet and cleans easier than the worn out DID. The TAG rear sprocket is gorgeous and looks to be a quality piece. 

 

Next work with the bike will be valve adjustment and then an exhaust.

 

IMG_1504.JPGIMG_1502.JPGIMG_1500.JPG

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Nice. I would love a Timbersled for my '14. 

 

Here's my junk:

 

IMG_2066_zps685e824a.jpg

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Swapped out my 09 stock shorty exhaust for stock 07 exhaust with the smaller diameter header and longer muffler. I'm not crazy about the look but if it wakes up the low end, I'll be happy. Cost $70 and 15mins.

image.jpg

image.jpg

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16766412287_f1adba2131_h_d.jpg

 

That's a KTM headlight, right? I've been thinking about replacing my DHH with something capable of a little more light output.

 

Off topic, but are you the same n16ht5 that had that awesome 4runner on 37s?

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Yes sir...small world. Haven't been over there much the last few years but I recognized the name. How do you like the light output on that headlight?

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