tmrider

Pics of your 06-09 yzf 450

275 posts in this topic

Got it from a friend who added an 18" rear wheel, Wr450 header, radiator guards, 51 tooth sprocket, factory connection revalve, oring chain. I added a Boyeson Supercooler oversized water pump and coolant catch tank.

 

I would look at adding a rekluse sooner or later. On the tight single track it was hard to keep the motor going on mine but on the wider single track the bike did really well.

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This is how my girl looks like right now. I just got the springs changed, S-12 tires, bars cut down 5/8 of an inch on each side( I wanted to do an inch but the handle guard mounts wouldn't let me), now I just need to do the normal servicing and pop a rekluse in.

56893A30-CC20-44B7-8A39-85EE2F2401BF_zps

Edited by 700rScott

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I would look at adding a rekluse sooner or later. On the tight single track it was hard to keep the motor going on mine but on the wider single track the bike did really well.

I've been considering that, mainly as an anti-stall device.  I prefer to manage the bike's power with the lever in the corners, coasting in and feathering it on the way out.  I had a Rekluse on a WR but I messed up and got the cheaper version (2.0) and the clutch pull was too stiff.  Rode some rocky single track last weekend and everyone had the higher end Rekluse.  20 minutes into the ride and I knew why.

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I've been considering that, mainly as an anti-stall device.  I prefer to manage the bike's power with the lever in the corners, coasting in and feathering it on the way out.  I had a Rekluse on a WR but I messed up and got the cheaper version (2.0) and the clutch pull was too stiff.  Rode some rocky single track last weekend and everyone had the higher end Rekluse.  20 minutes into the ride and I knew why.

 The EXP has resiantace in the cable but the Z pro does not when it's not engaged but I heard even when the motor revs up the clutch pull is much lighter. I remember one trail over the summer it was pretty rocky and up hill. I stalled once and then tried to get going again, I stalled probably 5-6 times before I got to a section where I could keep my momentium up and keep the motor running. Now witht he rekluse I won't hate that trail as much if I go back there.

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I prefer to manage the bike's power with the lever in the corners, coasting in and feathering it on the way out.  

 

 

Maybe it's just because I started riding big thumpers back in the sixties, but that seems like such an odd technique to use on a bike with as much low end torque as the big YZ.  Even before I switched to a Rekluse, The only reason I would put a hand on the clutch lever was to prevent a stall.  Absolutely never feathered a clutch out of a turn unless I was almost stopped in 1st gear.  You can control both engine braking and "feather" the exit acceleration with the throttle.    To each his own, I suppose.

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only reason I would put a hand on the clutch lever..

 

I always ride with a finger on each lever...  I had a rekluse on my wr450, won't be putting one on the yz450. it is nice to prevent stalls, but the lack of engine braking kills all the positives for me.

 

Sunday

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16135924608_d3a34cda62_h_d.jpg

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There is no lack of engine braking with a Rekluse clutch unless you pul the lever in and let the engine idle down while rolling.  The clutch works simply on the speed of the driven gear/basket half of the clutch, so as long as it's spinning faster than the engagement speed, it stays connected, regardless of throttle position, on or off.

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Maybe it's just because I started riding big thumpers back in the sixties, but that seems like such an odd technique to use on a bike with as much low end torque as the big YZ.  Even before I switched to a Rekluse, The only reason I would put a hand on the clutch lever was to prevent a stall.  Absolutely never feathered a clutch out of a turn unless I was almost stopped in 1st gear.  You can control both engine braking and "feather" the exit acceleration with the throttle.    To each his own, I suppose.

There is no lack of engine braking with a Rekluse clutch unless you pul the lever in and let the engine idle down while rolling.  The clutch works simply on the speed of the driven gear/basket half of the clutch, so as long as it's spinning faster than the engagement speed, it stays connected, regardless of throttle position, on or off.

 

I came from a Raptor 700 so I'm use to the low end lugging like you do and going to this was a whole lot different since it has the low end grunt but not as much as that 700 does. My buddy that sold me the rekluse told me low and hard for the set up so it still acts like normal motor but doesn't stall. I hate using the clutch I'd rather it do the work than me working it and by half way through the season I got pretty good at the throttle control but my clutch control still needs alot of work.

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My Z-Start Pro I have set up at "medium/soft" or "medium/ slow".  Much more effective off-road, IMO.

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I guess I'll have some playing around with it to see what I like cause I know they have low medium high and then hard and soft.

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I myself don't have a Rekluse, but on my 450, I use the clutch a lot in corners or whenever I need a little boost. I understand that all I really need to do is twist the throttle, but when I slip the clutch, the higher RPM's make more power, just like on a 2 smoke, therefore I come out of the corner faster. Maybe it's the tall 1st gear on my YZ, but, I like to use the clutch. Maybe I will have a Rekluse someday.

This is a good thread, I like the input.

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The L/M/H part is the engagement "point", the RPM where engagement activity begins, and is set, as you probably now already know, by the spring selection.  The "hard/soft" question is the engagement "rate", or how quickly (i.e., over how wide a range of engine speed) it goes from disengaged to engaged.   "Hard" is like letting the lever out to the catch point at any certain RPM and then more or less letting it go suddenly, whereas "soft" is like you did the same thing at the same engine speed, but feathered it in as the engine rose another 5-600 RPM. 

 

I found the Med/Hard setting too aggressive to allow a second gear start from a standstill, and if you lost too much speed in a sandy uphill turn in second, it would engage so fast that it killed the engine.  Med/Soft fixed that, and the clutch still feels solidly hooked up at a pretty low engine speed underway.

 

Oh, and when you're standing at idle in gear WATCH OUT for people who want to fiddle with giving your throttle a blip, 'K? :smirk:

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Maybe it's just because I started riding big thumpers back in the sixties, but that seems like such an odd technique to use on a bike with as much low end torque as the big YZ.  Even before I switched to a Rekluse, The only reason I would put a hand on the clutch lever was to prevent a stall.  Absolutely never feathered a clutch out of a turn unless I was almost stopped in 1st gear.  You can control both engine braking and "feather" the exit acceleration with the throttle.    To each his own, I suppose

 

Yep.  There's no right or wrong, only preferences.

 

I personally don't want any engine braking in the corners. Rear wheel drag on deceleration will cause the bike to stand up and sometimes stall (if in the wrong gear).  With the rear freewheeling and the rpms near idle, the big 450 (or any 4-stroke) is much easier to push over in the corners.  It also makes it easier to maneuver and stop the bike in those near miss encounters.  On exiting the corner, feathering the clutch helps manage rear wheel kick out (low sides) until everything gets lined up well enough to give it full torque. This is a technique I've used for long time but only when riding at an aggressive pace in tight singletrack.  On straighter trails there is no need to pull in the clutch. 

 

For me the Rekluse is nothing more than a very expensive anti-stall device.   However, if all you ride is extremely technical terrain, it's money well spent for those who need it. 

Edited by Navaho6

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Oh, and when you're standing at idle in gear WATCH OUT for people who want to fiddle with giving your throttle a blip, 'K? :smirk:

 

HAHA I'll have to remember that.  

 

I'll do medium soft then. Why reinvent the wheel when someone else figured it out.

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You can always change it back if you don't like it as much as your current setup.  That's the beauty of it.

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16135924608_d3a34cda62_h_d.jpg

Watching these pics Im speechless. Amazing.

 

Im moving from a 300 two stroke to big four stroke soon. And one day, one day I will get this snow kit what you guys have... Amazing

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There is no lack of engine braking with a Rekluse clutch unless you pul the lever in and let the engine idle down while rolling.  The clutch works simply on the speed of the driven gear/basket half of the clutch, so as long as it's spinning faster than the engagement speed, it stays connected, regardless of throttle position, on or off.

 

I should have been more specific. I was talking about near idle/idle and bike off lack of engine braking. Up here in WA on mountain trails, having a stopped/stalled bike on a hill or switchback and nothing to hold it there has caused me more problems than it has been worth. Also, the Z start pro has the most abnormal clutch feeling... I use my clutch as much as my brake lever, so the Z Start pro version was really screwing me up. If you want a rekluse to bandaid your lack of clutch skills you should be mastering the clutch first.

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I should have been more specific. I was talking about near idle/idle and bike off lack of engine braking. Up here in WA on mountain trails, having a stopped/stalled bike on a hill or switchback and nothing to hold it there has caused me more problems than it has been worth. Also, the Z start pro has the most abnormal clutch feeling... I use my clutch as much as my brake lever, so the Z Start pro version was really screwing me up. If you want a rekluse to bandaid your lack of clutch skills you should be mastering the clutch first.

 

Uh huh, thanks for the lame, "sour grapes" attempt at elevating your argument by demeaning me.  I'll put my clutch skills against yours on any day.  One thing you may want to comtemplate is whether the bike would even have stalled in the first place on your hillclimb had you had the clutch and engine set up right, but perhaps not.  The fact is that regardless of your skill level, the Rekluse can and will react to changes in engine speed before you can even detect them, and will always respond to them in the same way.  Since that response is also tunable, it can be as appropriate as you want to make it. The only thing it can't do is predict things.  Then again, it normally doesn't need to.

 

The Rekluse isn't for everyone, especially not those who don't really want to adapt, and they don't solve every problem one might run into without creating a couple of their own.  Trade offs are everywhere, and if it doesn't balance out in your world, that's entirely OK.   There was a time when my riding venues and conditions were different, and at that point, I didn't care much for them myself, so I understand what your point of view is, but as things are now, I find it extremely advantageous to have one, particularly after I decided to make it work for me.

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