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BR8EG or BR8ES?

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Is it OK to run a normal ol' BR8ES plug in a YZ250? The bike came with a BR8EG, which from what I can tell is just a "racing" plug that costs 3 times what a normal plug does.

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Is it OK to run a normal ol' BR8ES plug in a YZ250? The bike came with a BR8EG, which from what I can tell is just a "racing" plug that costs 3 times what a normal plug does.

The "ES" is a non-resister plug. It could damage your CDI unit. I have a 92 Cr250 and always went cheap on the plugs, "ES", so far it hasn't hurt anything but any professional tuner will tell you not to run them.

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"R" is for resistor.

The "S" is for standard, and the "G" is the first step up the money ladder for NGK spark plugs.

As far as CDI damage, Eric Gorr stated that the resistor plugs made no difference. It is somewhere on his site, or you can look in one of his books.

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Is it OK to run a normal ol' BR8ES plug in a YZ250? The bike came with a BR8EG, which from what I can tell is just a "racing" plug that costs 3 times what a normal plug does.

Yes you can run them. Technically (at least according to NGK ) the BR8EG resists fouling better than the BR8ES.

When I didn't have a BR8EG around I have run them and to be honest couldn't tell the difference.

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I know the EG should resist fouling better. It costs twice as much, etc. Seriously the only plugs I ever cold foul are EG's. I like the BR8ES plug just fine. I found several cases of them last year for 10 cents each. I sold most of them but kept enough of them for me.

Actually, even the EG is not really a high dollar plug.They are a "step-up" but nothing too special. NGK has some that work in our bikes for 25-30 bucks. They do consider these high-dollar.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Q: When should I use a resistor spark plug?

A: NGK "R" or resistor spark plugs use a 5k ohm ceramic resistor in the spark plug to suppress ignition noise generated during sparking.

NGK strongly recommends using resistor spark plugs in any vehicle that uses on-board computer systems to monitor or control engine performance. This is because resistor spark plugs reduce electromagnetic interference with on-board electronics.

They are also recommended on any vehicle that has other on-board electronic systems such as engine-management computers, two-way radios, GPS systems, depth finders or whenever recommended by the manufacturer.

In fact, using a non-resistor plug in certain applications can actually cause the engine to suffer undesirable side effects such as an erratic idle, high-rpm misfire, engine run-on, power drop off at certain rpm levels and abnormal combustion.

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Thanks guys. I'm gonna stick with BR8ES. Five bucks a plug for the EG is a little silly.

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My local shop charges 5.00 for the es. MAILORDER RULES!!! Try the tt store and see how cheap these plugs really are.

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My local shop charges 5.00 for the es. MAILORDER RULES!!! Try the tt store and see how cheap these plugs really are.
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My local shop charges me like two bucks for the "ES".

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The "ES" is a non-resister plug. It could damage your CDI unit. I have a 92 Cr250 and always went cheap on the plugs, "ES", so far it hasn't hurt anything but any professional tuner will tell you not to run them.

Nope, the R in BR indicates that it IS a resistor plug....look here for a downloadable chart from NGK.

http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/techinfo/spark_plugs/faq/faqcode.asp?nav=31200&country=US

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How about the BR8EYA?

I work at a snomobile shop, and we swap BR9EYA's into sleds all the time where a BR9ES is supposed to be. Whats the difference?

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"The "ES" is a non-resister plug" I still believe that statement to be factual. Nope to what?

OK-here goes. B=14mm thread diameter---R=resistor---EG=V grooved nickel alloy center electrode--- ES=standard 3/4 inch reach center electrode. So, a B8ES is a non resistor plug. A BR8ES is a resistor plug. The EG is less prone to fouling, according to NGK. I have found the opposite to be true. I like the ES plugs. I get them at the auto parts store for 99 cents.

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"The "ES" is a non-resister plug" I still believe that statement to be factual. Nope to what?

An "R" after the letter designation indicates a resistor plug. So the BR8ES is a resistor plug.

The ES or EG signifies what electrode type is used. ES is standard electrode, EG is fine wire type.

As mentioned go to the NGK site and they have a nice chart that explains it.

http://www.spark-plugs.co.uk/pages/technical/ngkjpg.htm

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If Your Store Is Charging 5.00bucks For An Es You Need To Find A New Store, I Am The Parts Guy At Mine And An Es Is 2.50, No Shipping Like You Would With Mail Order

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I did find a place to beat the price. I bought three cases of Br8EG's for .25 cents each.

The local shop will hammer you on your way out to ride or somehting like that. You need a bottle of Yamalube R and a goggle lens, lets say.

You stop in and your mind starts to wonder..."How am I doing on plugs......."

Hey, throw a couple of the Br8es's in , please"

Look at final bill and realize he hammered you 4.99 each for them. However, he did give you the "10% racers discount". LOL They did me this way ONCE.

I drove 30 miles to buy my 2006 yz 250 when these folks are 2 miles away. Hope they enjoyed the extra buck on the plug.

I also think the "Y" in the BR8EYA stands for ..."Charge them two bucks more because its too cold to be riding in the snow."

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An "R" after the letter designation indicates a resistor plug. So the BR8ES is a resistor plug.

The ES or EG signifies what electrode type is used. ES is standard electrode, EG is fine wire type.

As mentioned go to the NGK site and they have a nice chart that explains it.

http://www.spark-plugs.co.uk/pages/technical/ngkjpg.htm

I see said the blind man.

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