When is it time to quit???

I got my family into riding about 4 years ago because of the saying .. " You can take your kid hunting now or later when their teen agers you can hunt for you kid." Well for 4 years it has done an awesome job of bringing us together.

I broke my collar bone, scapula and 2 ribs the first year. In Feb. 06 I broke L-2-3-4 spinal trans processors.4 weeks ago I shattered my right hip having to be flown to Baton Rouge for reconstructive surgery, and I also broke spinal processors t-2 through t-8.

My kids have had a few hard crashes but never a trip to the hospital. I race 250c, my daughter 125 d and my son 85 beginner so we are all decent riders and I preach smooth riding.

Both recent crashes were stupid, the last was kicking neutral on the face of a short double.

Am I accident pron and need to quit. My employment says quit riding or possibly loose my job. 100 plus a year and any car on our Highline used car lot.

Oh all of our tracks are 1 hr 45 min - 3hrs away.

Just for the record the first time I broke my back I was of 1 day and this last time I'm back at work after 2 weeks.

Personal decision. You'll know when the time is right. At the end of my MX days, about 30 years ago, I decided to try another form of riding and got a trials bike. Had lots of fun on it and stayed in the game with my brothers and dad. I now enjoy an occassional scramble and long trail rides but try to follow the "80% rule" meaning I try never to ride over 80% of my ability even in a race.

How about stepping back from racing and just play/trail riding around with your kids; at least that way you are less likely to get as hurt.

Jgerdi,

If I may, let me first tell you quickly my story and then my opinion.

I used to race MX for several years, from age 8 to age 27. I did not get injured as much as you did, but my right knee is pretty much finished (8 surgeries, I am 42 and should need soon a knee replacement that I try to postpone as much as possible). Believe it or not, after 15 years of not riding, I have picked up a WR450 this year (which I'll be trading for a 2007 YZ450, silver of course!) and it is the best decision I have ever made!!! I am in bette shape and happier (riding makes me happy!); it is also a wonderful family activity my wife started riding also (she has a CRF250X).

Of course, as one gets older and somewhat banged up, one has to make compromises. Because of my knee I don't ride MX very much, when I do I avoid doubles or triples, however I love tabletops. I do race Hare Scrambles and trail ride a lot.

Riding at slower speeds or "differently" can be still a lot of fun, it is much better than giving it up altogether. (just my 2 cents). I regret having stopped riding for 15 years, don't make my mistake.

It isnt something you can give up, it is an addiction. What else provides the personal satisfaction that a day of riding (any kind) brings? I love my family more than anything in the world and dont ever want to jeopardize their security however my life isnt over either. I do ride a bit more cautiously (or maybe I am just more aware of the consequences of a mistake). I started racing (RRing) after 35 and never realized the thrill of competition til then. Sure I had gone fast on bikes before but not battled for position. What replaces that? I did a cross country race in OK last weekend (My first CC). It seemed very safe, I didnt see many crashes to speak of, stalls and tipovers more than anything. Another thing I thought was odd was the lack of jumping in the race, even the fast guys (fast by any measure!, track or trail, dont under estimate top cc riders at all) stayed glued to the ground. Of course spending most of my time on tracks, jumps arent as overwhelming as they might be if I was trailriding only. The challenges were there dont get me wrong, it had every variable. There were creeks with rocks, sand, loam, pavement and water, we even went thru 2 different buildings. Heal up, reassess and come back. I have spent somewhere around 2-3 years healing from different injuries in my life (not at once just total of all combined) many times I have left only to come back and reinvigorate myself. Only a few sports have provided that thrill and unfortunately all seem to hurt when I mess up. I wish you the best in your decisions.

gatorbiker I just had a total knee replacement, age 53, ride trails only. To cut to the quick, at 8 wks post op I did my first ride yesterday (01 YZ426) . At this juncture I think it is a good thing; the babe and I are planning on skiing in January, something I have not done for 5 years because it hurt too much. The time to do the TKR is when your quality of life slips enough that you want to regain the freedoms and pleasures that were once were yours. Understand this procedure is not without PAIN. Still hurts. I expect the lost few months, pain and PT anguish will be all worth it. :thumbsup

Moderation in everything, that’s my motto.

You don’t have to race to ride.

Why do people think you can’t ride unless you race? Not saying you personally never just ride, it’s just what most people think when you tell them you ride dirtbikes.

I’ve been riding dirtbikes for over 35 years, I’ve broken my wrist once and separated my shoulder once. That’s it. (Knock on wood.) I’ve raced a few times over the years, the main reasons I don’t are cost, amount of track time, and mostly I don’t have anything to prove to myself or anyone else about how good or bad I am. I know I’m faster than most but will never be the fastest, there’s always somebody faster.

The moderation thing is huge for me, think about when people get in trouble and it’s almost always because they’re doing something to an extreme. (Extreme is different for different people.) Extreme for my son would be doing a 90foot triple, he would definitely get hurt. A 90 foot jump for me wouldn’t be something I would take lightly, but it wouldn’t be extreme for me, so my chances of being hurt are far less. My point is, when I ride I’m very conscious of my abilities, what I can and can’t do. I won’t attempt a jump unless I know for sure I’ll clear it. Stay below your abilities most of the time and your injuries will drop. If you can’t ride at 80% so you won’t get hurt, you better be ready to break some more bones.

And for those of you that are thinking, if you’re not pushing it you’re not getting better, there is some truth to that. (My brother used to say “if you’re not crashing, you’re not riding fast enough”... he quit riding after a couple years.) There’s just a time and a place when pushing the envelope is safer. If I’m on a hardpack, slippery track where if you go down it’s gonna hurt, I’ll ride super conservative. If I’m on a nice soft sand track, I’ll push it harder because the risk of getting hurt is lower.

Obviously none of this applies if you’re a pro chasing Ricky or something, then you better be riding at 150%. My point is there’s a consequence to riding like that. If you’re not getting paid to ride like that why do it?

Same with how often you ride, I see guys riding 1 and 2 times a week and racing on the weekends. I had lots of friends that did that when we were younger and none of them ride anymore. Most of them have busted up bodies and can hardly walk. My dad wouldn’t let me race when I was younger, I could ride all I wanted but no sanctioned races. I wished I could back then, but I’m very thankful he wouldn’t let me. I doubt I’d still be riding today if I’d gotten into racing MX 30 years ago.

As usual, just my .02

I just thought I’d put my experience out there because if you want to still be riding with your son when he’s 35, I don’t think it’ll happen the way you're going.

I decided it was time to get out when I crashed hard while I was just practice riding, tore my rotator cuff and 5 months later it still hasn't healed. I used to lift weights religously to blow off stress from work but after 5 months without being able to I feel I am about to blow my stack. Their are alot of things I feel I would prefer to spend my time and money doing. Good luck.

This is just my opinion though, to each their own as they say.

This is a topical discussion for me.

I am 50 and 2 weeks ago I broke my first 2 bones in riding.

collar bone and L2 transverse process.

It is the first time I have broken a bone since I was 12 years old and the most chronic pain I have endured since I ripped up my back body surfing about 16 years ago.

Funny thing is I still enjoy body surfing but wouldn't go out of my way to do it but I can't wait to get back on the bike.

I don't race, but I am dumb enough to still ride too close to my abilities hence the nice endo I did which got me in this position. I will definitely ride again. But pain is a good teacher so I'll be a bit more careful..

I rode pretty much every day when I was a teenager. I was out of off road riding for about 15 years until I was 35 and bought a KDX-200. It brought back all the fond memories and I had a blast riding it. I sold the KDX and bought a CR250 and that made it worse. I rode about every weekend when I first got the CR. I went and watched a local MX race and decided I would give it a shot. I went out and raced Vet C and the thrill of competition proved to be very addicting much like fastest1 said. Then this spring I was practicing and went down breaking my collar bone and 2 ribs. It did make me think for sure. When I really thought about it though, I realized that the reason I got hurt was a preventable mistake. I was riding and taking my time, trying to work on certain things, and I got to the point where I was pretty tired. I was ready to pack it up and thought,"one more lap"....and thats when it happened. Dumb thing, the front wheel corkscrewed in and I went down. When I am on the track I feel like I do ok staying within my ability and I have a blast battling with people that are at my pace. I dont think I will ever be a front runner but thats not what it is about for me right now. If I wanted that I should have started competing a long time ago. So, after I healed, I bought an '06 YZ450 and this weekend I am entering my first race with it. I cant wait. I love this bike. Much easier to ride for me than my CR was.

That is probably some of "BEST" advice I've read for a long time!!

"The 80 percent rule" !!!!!

I will never quit. Nothing gives me the high that my bike does. I could not live without it. I don't race much anymore either. I used to only race MX, but since my wife got into the sport we mainly just trail ride. I've had surgeries and broken bones, but the thought of quiting never crossed my mind.

Hell my Dad still rides. He is in his 50's and still enjoys ripping thru the woods on his XR400. :thumbsup:

Dont quit....Just start riding sensibly....Do you really enjoy being laid up and in casts and stuff..??? Its a no brainer, and I mean this not in a hurtful way..just wake up and smell the coffee...Pull your head out of your arse..!! Every day your down, is a day your not riding..Get off the track and go see some country, Ride the trails..

I rode pretty much every day when I was a teenager. I was out of off road riding for about 15 years until I was 35 and bought a KDX-200. It brought back all the fond memories and I had a blast riding it. I sold the KDX and bought a CR250 and that made it worse. I rode about every weekend when I first got the CR. I went and watched a local MX race and decided I would give it a shot. I went out and raced Vet C and the thrill of competition proved to be very addicting much like fastest1 said. Then this spring I was practicing and went down breaking my collar bone and 2 ribs. It did make me think for sure. When I really thought about it though, I realized that the reason I got hurt was a preventable mistake. I was riding and taking my time, trying to work on certain things, and I got to the point where I was pretty tired. I was ready to pack it up and thought,"one more lap"....and thats when it happened. Dumb thing, the front wheel corkscrewed in and I went down. When I am on the track I feel like I do ok staying within my ability and I have a blast battling with people that are at my pace. I dont think I will ever be a front runner but thats not what it is about for me right now. If I wanted that I should have started competing a long time ago. So, after I healed, I bought an '06 YZ450 and this weekend I am entering my first race with it. I cant wait. I love this bike. Much easier to ride for me than my CR was.

thats the thing that always gets me one more ride, one more lap........... and then crash

Getting air raises the probability of injury by quite a bit. Its a numbers game. Yes, the trail can bite you in the arse too, but the odds are much higher when you are hucking air.

KH

thats the thing that always gets me one more ride, one more lap........... and then crash

Yeap...I broke a collar bone on one "last lap" too.

Just back it down a notch and keep it fun, plenty of good advice here.

lots of good advice here. the big thing is the job telling you if you dont stop you could be unemployed. i would find out how serious they actually are, for your piece of mind and the families.

i have ridden, raced, left motorcycling, and came back, i will be 40 in a few months. my wife actually brought us back to the sport, wanting sportbikes again. we met a group of nice folks on the net, went to a ktm supermoto demo day and got hooked hard.

we had about 10-15 people we knew at the track that day, everyone except one person has bought a supermoto bike. my wife bought her's in december, my best friend bought his in march, i was last, as i couldnt find the right bike. finally bought mine in late april.

i raced mx ,sx, ax, for years as a youth and young man. and let me tell you the itch to compete with another human being doesnt leave you once you get it. with the afformentioned racing series, you get beat up every second of every lap. and the day after for us older people gets worse with time. (sad isnt it?) but i have found with supermoto, the obstacles arent near as treacherous, the combo of 17" wheels, big brakes, and sticky tires on asphalt or concrete is absoultly fun fun fun!!! throw in a small dirt section and know you have more fun than you ever have had on a bike.

i'm not saying give it all up, but the 80% rule, moderation, and possibly changing the type of riding may benefit everyone. if the kids still want to race, go be their wrench, and support them. but my money is on having you all try supermoto. kids, ladies and the men all can have fun. big plus, your not nearly as tired or dirty at the end of the day. and those that have ridden the dirt are ahead on the learning curve for this disipline of riding.

i wish you good luck on healing, and the best of luck for you and the family on your decision. to contemplate what you are doing, is the first step to knowing a change needs to be made. and i sir, salute you. ski

Yeap...I broke a collar bone on one "last lap" too.

Just back it down a notch and keep it fun, plenty of good advice here.

Definitely a trend here. I broke my collarbone and fractured L2 2 weeks ago. After riding hard and enjoying myself on an improvised sand track for an hour or so. decided to ride out on the dunes for some fun. I planned a 30 minute ride and got 20 minutes into it. One last jump, it was a beauty but the landing was crap..

80% rule is making lots of sense now.. :lame::thumbsup:

People are pissed at the injuries...not the riding.

Compromise. Ride safer, slower, and smarter.

If your kids were getting hurt like you are (severe) would you let them keep riding?

It can be done. Lots of people own vettes or vipers without getting tickets.

Sure it sucks, but sometimes thats one of the hidden costs of owning a home and having a family.

After the house is paid for and the kids are raised, go balls out again. We can be the fastest 80 year olds on the planet!

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