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Bill

MX Tuner & John Curea..............

7 posts in this topic

MX,

I saw your comment about me4asuring race sag. You sadi stand on the pegs. I was told to sit on the seat in the attack/race position. Or is it, my race position is sitting down :):D:D

John,

Have any input?

Anyone else?

Thanks guys

Bill

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Bill, Put a scale under each of your wheels. have someone hold you steady and read the scales with you sitting down. Move one inch back and take another reading, BIG difference! When you stand it concentrates your mass in a central location. Giving you a more consistent reading. Very repeatable. It is difficult to get that when sitting. Remember it is a baseline setting to "START FROM". Then when you want to correct you know you are starting from the same point every time. PT

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Yup, what Paul said. Sag is an adjustment. There is no magic number. It is whatever works for you. The adjustment range is intended to be from 90mm to 105mm or something along those lines. This means it is critical that you can get a consistent reading every time you measure. Sitting on the seat doesn't guarantee this. You'd be amazed at how much the measurement changes if you sit a little forward or rearward of your initial measurement. It'll get you chasing your tail.

Some suspension tuners say for the rider to sit in the attack position during the measurement, for instance. This leaves a lot of margin for error from one time to the next.

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Bill

I prefer to measure sag with a rider sitting down. Riders usually sit as they go through a turn, and I like to have a riders' bike geometry set up for turns.

Too much sag and you get an understeer situation, not enough and the bike has a tendency to stinkbug.

I agree what Paul says about being off an inch while standing can alter the weight bias significantly. Thats anothe reason I prefer sitting, I believe it is a more consistent method.

Although, either way, try to be consistent every time you take a measurement.

Take Care,

John

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John my post does not say to read sag sitting down. But I've heard it works with pygmies, if they can reach the bars.

John I swear I'm just pokin fun, and you are sooo polite even when somebody's bustin on ya. I hope I am as smooth as you are, Even though our opinions differ. And our methodologies are similar. But I still think you should stand PT

[ November 30, 2001: Message edited by: Paul Thistle ]

[ November 30, 2001: Message edited by: Paul Thistle ]

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Pauly

You're killing me, what did you edit out..??!!

I bet it was extremely funny !!

I dont know if I am that polite, I just cant see getting upset over nothing,....now if ya mess with my bike or riding gear , we got a problem, pal.!! :)

"methodologies"..

My dear sir, you are truly a learned man.....

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Well John, I think faster than I type,and after I post it always looks like jethro on a sloe day! My mother was British and you know how proper they like to think they are. So I gots to be careful now that she can see me all the time from "up There".

Oh yeah one more thing, its "learnnnd"(like Homer says it).PT

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