Grayracer's chain slider fix...

First off, if you haven't seen it yet:

http://members.cox.net/oldernyzer/wearplate.htm

Anyways, I went to a local welding shop, picked up a piece of 24ga 304 Stainless Steel (exactly what Gray said would be best).

I cut it perfect, it lines up, fits good, all that is good. Anyways...before I even added the Silicone I wanted to make sure it would fit with the screws...it does, but the problem is, it doesn't "slide," like it would if I didn't have it. So I figure forget it, about to order a TM Chain slider and just be done with it.

I noticed Gray did his on a '03 model throughout that article...Gray, have you also done this with you're '06? I'm just wondering if the screws are maybe even smaller on a '06 which is why any extra thickness would make it not slide. I even drilled out larger holes on the steel, still no luck.

As anyone done this fix on their '06 YZF and did it work, does it SLIDE?

Thanks.

Here is a picture of mine, if it fits, I would still shave some off the edges and make it nice, but first I want to know how, and if it can work.

picturerx6.jpg

It's one of the first things I did to the '06, and yes, the slider is still free to shuffle back and forth. One thing that could be causing what you're seeing as a problem is that the wear plate runs over a weld and a change of angle that the steel sheet has not been formed into yet when first installed. Normal chain slap will quickly take care of that for you, silicon or not, and it will be formed into a perfect mirror of the swing arm's surface contour after the first ride.

Don't enlarge the holes too much, or the shouldered bolts/"hat" washers (depending on the year model) will be able to pass through them and hold too much tension on the slider.

It's one of the first things I did to the '06, and yes, the slider is still free to shuffle back and forth. One thing that could be causing what you're seeing as a problem is that the wear plate runs over a weld and a change of angle that the steel sheet has not been formed into yet when first installed. Normal chain slap will quickly take care of that for you, silicon or not, and it will be formed into a perfect mirror of the swing arm's surface contour after the first ride.

Don't enlarge the holes too much, or the shouldered bolts/"hat" washers (depending on the year model) will be able to pass through them and hold too much tension on the slider.

Alright, thanks for the verification on that it will work after I ride it a bit.

Thats a lot of work. All you need to do is put a (special) washer under the flange of the hat bushing to pinch the slider and keep it from moving.

Thats a lot of work. All you need to do is put a (special) washer under the flange of the hat bushing to pinch the slider and keep it from moving.

It is supposed to move...why do you think I'm going through the trouble of making this with a piece of sheet metal...if it didn't have to move I would just silicone it up so no dirt gets under it and call it done. By the way, it's not a lot of work at all, seems like it would be, all you do is cut a piece of metal, "glue" if you will, it onto the swingarm, and you're done.

it doesn't have to move side to side as long as its lined up straight silicone that sucker to the swingarm and be done with it :thumbsup:

it doesn't have to move side to side as long as its lined up straight silicone that sucker to the swingarm and be done with it :thumbsup:

No, it slides up and down, not side to side. If it didn't slide, like it is supposed to, then I would think the chain slider would wear very fast.

I just opted to put the TM Designworks stuff on. This whole sheetmetal and silicone business is not for me. :thumbsup:

No, it slides up and down, not side to side. If it didn't slide, like it is supposed to, then I would think the chain slider would wear very fast.

up and down?? well whatever,i've had 2 TM design sliders siliconed to the swingarm and both lasted the year they are warranted for. thats sayin' alot because i have a tendancy to destroy things alot faster than most people :thumbsup:

up and down?? well whatever,i've had 2 TM design sliders siliconed to the swingarm and both lasted the year they are warranted for. thats sayin' alot because i have a tendancy to destroy things alot faster than most people :applause:
Hey, it's always nice to be able to say you have a talent. :thumbsup: In the computer business, some people consider that an asset.

By "up and down" I figure he means "fore and aft".

It could be reasonably argued that the Designworks slider is the ultimate cure for the problem, and they will out last the stock slider, at least I would hope they would, by a considerable margin.

But here is my rationale for the wear plate approach. First, it cures the problem of wear to the swing arm. Stops it cold. So does the TM, and so does gluing the slider down or putting foam or rubber under it. But padding it with anything the least bit thick raises the slider farther up into the chain path, which isn't good. Gluing it down works until the glue lets go (which, of course, it may not) and it defeats the ability of the slider to move around as it was designed to do.

I don't profess to know the precise reason that Yamaha spent such a great deal of effort to set it up to have that little bit of free travel, but it would have been much simpler and somewhat less expensive not to have done so. I figure they had a good reason. Using a thin stainless steel (or steel, or even acrylic plastic; SS is just harder and won't rust) wear plate allows that feature to be retained while it stops swing arm wear as well as any other method, and does so without creating any new problems. The only thing wrong with the TM is that it costs 32 times as much as doing it my way, if you don't factor in the time you spend on it. That's really all there is to it. :ride:

ya, tearin' stuff up is what i'm best at! i guess thats a talent :thumbsup: TM is coming out with a new OEM replacement(so they say) made of the same material. i would think they might be a little cheaper (hopefully) :ride:

YEP! Looked at mine after about 6 hours of time. It's got wear. I wish I would have read about this problem before I got the bike. I'm a 1st time Yamaha owner and it makes me wonder how many swingarms out there have been destroyed. My Kawi chain slider does not move. I'm going to look at its swingarm for wear. If there is none, I'm going to use those (special) washers to pinch my slider to the Yami swingarm. Thanks for posting this very important topic. And thanks for Thumpertalk.com.

YEP! Looked at mine after about 6 hours of time. It's got wear. I wish I would have read about this problem before I got the bike. I'm a 1st time Yamaha owner and it makes me wonder how many swingarms out there have been destroyed. My Kawi chain slider does not move. I'm going to look at its swingarm for wear. If there is none, I'm going to use those (special) washers to pinch my slider to the Yami swingarm. Thanks for posting this very important topic. And thanks for Thumpertalk.com.

I wonder how many swing arms actually got destroyed, or ruined because of this...sure they wear, but have any of them actually broke? Hopefully none of them have, but I was just wondering if there is anyone out there that had this go so far, to break the weld, and destroy the swing arm...I ask this because I see old 400's and stuff with the stock chain slider, I'm always wondering how there swing arm looks...

...sure they wear, but have any of them actually broke? Hopefully none of them have, but I was just wondering if there is anyone out there that had this go so far, to break the weld(?)...
Yes, they have.
Yes, they have.

2swingarm.jpg

2swingarm.jpg

'Tol' ya! (ouch!)

2swingarm.jpg

Looks more like embrittlement along the weld and nothing to do with the slider. Odd the crack was along the top and not the bottom. Seems like the load would be under.

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