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nolefan419

Anyone having problems w/axle blocks?

21 posts in this topic

I just bought a YZ 450 f thursday and I got to ride it for the first time Sunday. When I got home I went to adjust my chain and one axle block has 9 lines on it and the otherside has 11 lines on it. I know this might sound stupid but shouldn't it be the same?

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Count the lines from the back of the block, not the front. The axle holder on the left side block is what takes up the space where the other 2 lines would go, that's why you need to count from the back of the block.

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I had same problem, I was counting wrong. Count from the back up into the bike...

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Ya, took me a while to figure out what was wrong with it too... after staring at it for a while I came to the same conclusion as Redbeard.

If you're really picky about your bike you should measure it with a tape measure or some other more accurate method instead. I just use the blocks.

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i got some 20 dollar ones from rocky mountan mc that have the same amount of slots on both sides and the axle slides into it so it doesn't bend like the stock one when you tighten it.

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No matter how good the blocks are, they're only as accurate as the marks on the swing arm. Rod type tools like the one linked to above are the most accurate, with measuring back from the swing arm pivot being a good second. A critical eyeball will also work. Once you've verified how accurate the marks really are, they can be used with more confidence.

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yeah i just recently figure you have to count from the back as well.

from the link someone posted above one of the reason to buy the tool....

"- All of the cool people have one"

hahah, guess im not cool :thumbsup:

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yeah i just recently figure you have to count from the back as well.

from the link someone posted above one of the reason to buy the tool....

"- All of the cool people have one"

hahah, guess im not cool :thumbsup:

hahaha, I never noticed that before! I guess that I am cool and you are not :ride:

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Another way is to put tension on the chain and then put a straight edge on the outside of the pins. If there is a gap in the middle between the chain and the straight edge the right side needs to go forward or the left back, if the straight edge rocks on the pins or is high in the middle the right side need to go back or the left forward depending on the correct chain slack. You want the chain and straight edge to touch on all the pins front to back and to pull straight off the rear sprocket. A good way to keep the chain tight while you do this is to place a small brass pin punch in between the chain a sprocket just behind the rear lower chain guide and GENTLY rotate the wheel to put tension on the chain.

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As long as the tire looks and spins stright, axle block marks line up, theirs really nothing to worry about, you won't notice a tiny tiny mark off or anything when riding...

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I don't use the marks on the axle blocks. I use a 12' steel measuring tape, I measure from a fixed point on the swingarm (where the axle bolt threads into the swingarm) to the rear edge of the axle block. This technique ensures the rear wheel is properly aligned too.

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Here's what I did:

I replaced the stock axle blocks with Ride Engineering blocks. To keep chain adjusted correctly, I place a 2" hole saw between the chain and swingarm at the tail end of the nylon chain/swingarm protector(see manual) and adjust until chain is tight. I remove the 2" hole saw and measure axle block positions for alignment. I got this tip from one of the Honda Factory Mechanics. It works great.

PS: The manual calls for between aprox 2 and 2 1/8" free play at the point I mentioned above, although I can't remember if I had to convert from MM to inches or not.....I don't have manual in front of me right now...

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Here's what I did:

I replaced the stock axle blocks with Ride Engineering blocks. To keep chain adjusted correctly, I place a 2" hole saw between the chain and swingarm at the tail end of the nylon chain/swingarm protector(see manual) and adjust until chain is tight. I remove the 2" hole saw and measure axle block positions for alignment. I got this tip from one of the Honda Factory Mechanics. It works great.

PS: The manual calls for between aprox 2 and 2 1/8" free play at the point I mentioned above, although I can't remember if I had to convert from MM to inches or not.....I don't have manual in front of me right now...

25.4mm = 1.0 inch

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I went out and got the manual. Section 3-32, Drive chain slack should be 48-58mm (1.9-2.3 inches).

It also shows an illistration of exactly where to measure. That's where to place the hole saw.

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If you had used a custom fabricated guage block, everyone would have been cool with it, but you found something to use for free. :thumbsup:

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Us guys in the Master class ( over 50) gotta use our experience from over the years. The hole saw was 3 bucks. I put the difference into other bike goodies.

After all, 2" is 2" any way you measue it. :thumbsup:

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After all, 2" is 2" any way you measue it. :thumbsup:

Sorry to burst your bubble, the it is probably a little more than 2" since you are using a radius to tension your chain. It is probably not much of a difference, but there is some.....technically :ride:

Sorry, just being a smart a$$

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