how you fix flat tire outdoor?

when you getting for a long distance ride (off road) and you get puncher,what do you guys do to fix it and how you prepare to the ride?

A 21" tube and 2 tire spoons get you out of trouble, front and back.

Just the same as I fix it indoors.... :thumbsup:

do you carry an adjustable wrench large enough for the axle nut? How do you support and prop up your bike to change the tire, use a rock? What kind of pump do you carry, etc. We need some more details from those that have actually done it.

Yes, this is a good point, it's much easier at home with all the right tools and equiptment forsure.

Motion pro has tire spoons get one with big end same size as you axle nut and the other tire spoon has a 12mm and 13mm for rim lock they are aluminum very light. Carry a patch kit and 12" tube and mini Bicycle air pump ( I perfer a pump over inflator cartridges). A rag or paper towel will be nice to keep your wheel bearing and seal out of the dirt. You can prop up your bike on rocks trees (whatever) or loosen the axle and chain and lay the bike over and slip the tire out. Then get to work.

http://www.motionpro.com/motorcycle/tools/t-6_combo_lever/

Tire changing and flat repair is all technique. With the proper tools as already mentioned, practice, practice and practice some more changing a tire on your garage floor. Or better yet, use your yard or any dirt surface.

Here is how we do it in the middle of nowhere in Baja. Fortunately, special Baja bike stands are in abundance.

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tshe, keep you head up and stay safe. I can't even imagine the hell you're going thru.

do you carry an adjustable wrench large enough for the axle nut? How do you support and prop up your bike to change the tire, use a rock? What kind of pump do you carry, etc. We need some more details from those that have actually done it.

Just tire spoons. Leave the rim on, remove the tire from one side, slide tube out, locate and fix hole, slide back in, spoon on tire. Wheel, rim or tube never completely comes off of bike.

All good advice...

Actually, I find it easier to change a tube on the trail. Why? Because the tire is hot and very plyable most of the time. The best thing to do when you get a flat is to make your way to a big rock,log or anything that you can prop your bike on, it might take you a couple of minutes to stumble on a good spot but it's worth it. Another good thing about fixing a flat on the trail is you should have some buddies with you to either help you or critique your skills. :ride:

I carry a 21" tube in a fender bag mounted on my front fender and someone else in my group carries an 18. I have always owned a Fredette wrench for both axles on the bike. Two small tire irons are fine to do the job. Like others have said, it's important to have a rag on the ground to lay the hub on, remember to keep all of the parts either in you fanny pack (that's probably laying on the ground already) or in a clean place. Extract the tube from the tire and rim and replace with a new tube. Yes, 21's fit fine in the rear but I like having both sized tubes to fit the correct wheel..I also keep CO2 in my front fender bag, two bottles fill it up. Don't worry about seating the bead on the trail, in a mile or two it will find it's way to the rim. Don't forget to tighten your rim locks...........

Good times.......... :thumbsup:

Dan

It's funny how bad luck just seems to follow some guys. In thirty plus years of street bikes, dirt bikes AND cars and trucks I don't think I've had five flats. (Although I did have two in one day on my work truck not to long ago. I don't count that since the company had to fix 'em. :thumbsup: ) I'd be interested to hear how often guys riding different terrains are having flats.

:ride:

Before you pull the tube out, try to figure out if the flat was due to a pinch or a puncture from a foreign object. If it was caused by a foreign object, sometimes the object (e.g. slender cactus needle) can still be stuck in the tire carcus, and in the case of cactus needles there is often more than one needle sticking thru. After you've determined the cause of the flat, pull out the tube and carefully run your hand along the inside of the tire to make sure you don't have multiple sharp objects.

Just tire spoons. Leave the rim on, remove the tire from one side, slide tube out, locate and fix hole, slide back in, spoon on tire. Wheel, rim or tube never completely comes off of bike.

Thats a good tip keeping the wheel on the bike and just trying to patch the puncture if possible. Never thought of that.

I carry a spare 21" tube and a small bicycle hand pump to air up the tire as well as a couple of shorty irons. I'll have to look into some patch kits as well. Seems like the more tools you take on a ride. The less you have to use them. Murphys law I guess.

Lots of good tips so far! I don't go on long distance cross country rides so I don't worry about fixing flats on the trail. I keep a stand, a bucket for a tire stand and fill it with soapy water, big tire irons and all the tools in camp. The only tire thing I carry on the trail is a wad of big fat cable ties. Some people call them zip ties, ect. but you know what I mean. You can ride a flat tire all day if you zip tie it to the rim as long as you're careful and keep your speed down and then you can fix the flat when and where you want to. Wrestling with a tire on the trail is about the last thing I want to do. :thumbsup:

All very good info. What about tire slime/tire sealant? Does it work to get you back to your truck to fix a flat?

Tire sealant just makes a huge mess and you will be lucky if it actually works. We used this a couple times when we were kids and sometimes it worked (for a little while), but it left a huge mess to clean up. I worked at Les Schwab during college and curse that crap!!! :thumbsup:

When I get a flat, I remove the cause (thorn, cactus needle, nail, etc.) then ride until the tire is smoking, then it comes off very easily with no tools. Also the heat will help seal up the hole left by the thorn or whatever. The tube comes out easily because it is getting close to a liquid state by this time. Pull a new tube out of your fenderpack, pop it in, air it up and you're on your way.

When replacing tyre at home I always use talcum powder on the tube, seems to help everything slip into place. I mainly do it because I was advised that it lets the tyre spin a little on the rim without taking the tube with it and snapping off the valve. Bonus is that it smells lovely :thumbsup:

Bonus is that it smells lovely :thumbsup:

Like old people!

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