HEADS UP!!!

Site upgrade in progress... Core site functions are working, but some non-critical features/functions will be temporarily unavailable while we work to restore them over the next couple of weeks.

Please post any bugs you encounter, but before you do, check to see if it's already listed.

Thanks for your patience while we work to improve the community.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
jaggley

I saved $32

33 posts in this topic

I always have a local motorcycle shop install my new tires. They charge 16 bucks per tire. I had a new Maxxis SM front and a Terra flex 150 rear to install so I figured I would save some money and change them myself. So i spent 20 bucks on rocky mountain for a set of spoons and got to work. Getting the rear tire off the rim took me about twenty minutes after i had removed the wheel from the bike, not too bad and only one bloody knuckle.

Has anyone tried to put on a terra flex :cry: An hour and thirty minutes later of sweating in 95' heat and seven bloody knuckles I got the bastard on. I was real careful with my spoons and it was Miller time. I chugged a beer and then aired it up to seat it. There wasn't a slow leak, more like a a gash the size of Las Vegas 45 year old ho. I pinched the tube. :ride:

The next day I went to the shop and dropped off my front, the new front tire and the rear with the T flex. When I picked it up they took care of the front, but told me to piss off, the rear is a night mare and it was too stiff for their tire changer. :ride: They sold me a new tube and I dropped $25 for that and the front.

Tonight I ripped up my thumb, but I got that tube in and the tire back on the rim. My hands are sore and my rim looks like hell, but I saved $32. :thumbsup:

Anyone interested in a set of used tire spoons?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It may help to put the tire in your car for an hour or so on hot day with the windows up to soften the rubber. It makes it way easier put it on whatever the tire is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tire changing definitely takes some practice. keep trying and you'll get better at it..... :thumbsup:

i got a lot of practice changing the tires on my wife's ttr125, and our KX80 before i tackled the big bike tires. there's a ton of technique and tricks to remember.

welcome to the tire changing club.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went through the same thing last week. I spent $30 on a pair of long irons and a 12" spoon. It took me and a friend an hour just for the rear... :ride: never again. Next time I'll pay the $30 to have Cycle Gear do it. :ride::cry: I can do a lot of things, but that was a lot of work and pretty much pissed me off :ride::ride::crazy:

I went with Maxxis IT rear, and ST front. :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It may help to put the tire in your car for an hour or so on hot day with the windows up to soften the rubber. It makes it way easier put it on whatever the tire is.

That is the secret! :thumbsup:

Front's are very basic to get on. I don't know why anyone would pay someone to put a new front on? The rear's I can understand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my dad and i were trying to take my back tire off and swap it out with a sand paddle and we ruined the tire cost us a couple of bucks and all we had to do was loosen to screws on the rim and the tire woulda came right off.( i noticed those 2 screws after we cut the tire)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
my dad and i were trying to take my back tire off and swap it out with a sand paddle and we ruined the tire cost us a couple of bucks and all we had to do was loosen to screws on the rim and the tire woulda came right off.( i noticed those 2 screws after we cut the tire)

:thumbsup: lol to funny bro....

After reading these post's, i think I'll spend that few Buck$! :ride:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love these stories. After the first couple of hundred tires, changing just becomes another dirty chore. Have somebody who has done their own for a few years show you how it's done. There are a few simple tricks to painless tire changing such as gloves, tire mounting lube, keeping the sprocket side down, understanding rimlocks and more that the novice just can't be expected to anticipate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

even though i think i've got changing tyres sorted, it's still a prick.

sweating swearing, skinned knuckles are all part and parcel.

like the idea of heating them up. i thought talcum powder was the saviour of tyre changing but i'll try heat next time. only thing is our top temp lately is 11 degrees c. have to wait.

gotta save that $32 bucks, pays for bandages and anasthetic after

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saved almost $120,... and that's only the first set of tires. :cry:

Dealer

MT16 80/100x21 - $85

Michelin UHD tube - $35

Installation - $20

Maxxis IT 100/100x18 - $75

Michelin UHD tube - $35

Installation - $20

NYS sales tax – $24

TOTAL - $294

DIY

MT16 80/100x21 - $65

Michelin UHD tube - $20

Installation - $0

Tire irons - $15

Maxxis IT 100/100x18 - $55

Michelin UHD tube - $20

Installation - $0

NYS sales tax – $0

TOTAL - $175

SAVINGS - $119

It's really not that hard. Plus, I've got tire irons for when I need to fix flats on the trail. :thumbsup: (A buddy recently got two flats in two days :ride: ).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These are my tire changing tips. Listed in the order of priority.

1) Good quality tire irons! The best ones I like are the Moose tire irons with the orange handles and the fat spoon. Don't mess around with the long skinny ones, they suck.

2) LUBE! 50% water, 50% dish soap. In a spray bottle. You don't need a lot, just a thin coating on the rubber and the inside of the rim.

3) A secure mount. Mounting the tire securely to something makes the job easier. Then you can concentrate on just removing the rubber from the rim and now trying to hold onto the wheel too.

4) Patience, and good technique. You don't need brute force to get the tire on and off. No matter how big or stiff the tire is. One trick I know is make sure that the tire is down inside the rim and not up on the bead when you're trying to slip over the last little section of the tire. I even use a clamp to squeeze the tire down into the rim. This helps alot.

5) Last but not least, Hot rubber is nice. It does make the job easier, but if it's not hot, don't let that stop you. I've changed tires in sub-zero temperatures before. You want to talk about stiff rubber....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The shop I buy from gives my 20% off a new tire purchase and installs the tire on the rim for free. I just have to bring in the rim.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think really depends on how often you change tires.

If you go through a tire a year, ya, have the shop do it....

If you go through a full set a tires a month and your girlfriends bike needs tires a couple times a year.......you WILL learn to do it yourself.

The more you do it the easier it gets......

Have someone experienced help you a couple of times and you will get it down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am with the other posts in their main message, "Do not give up, get good at it." When you are 30 miles from the truck on a rocky singletrack you need to know how to change your tires. Practice with your new tires, that way your worn tire will be easy out on the trail. Don't give up, you will get it after three of four changes. :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"make sure that the tire is down inside the rim and not up on the bead when you're trying to slip over the last little section of the tire"

This is VERY important!! Good Advice, it won't go on without doing this (especially the rear)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I saved almost $120,... and that's only the first set of tires. :cry:

Dealer

MT16 80/100x21 - $85

Michelin UHD tube - $35

Installation - $20

Maxxis IT 100/100x18 - $75

Michelin UHD tube - $35

Installation - $20

NYS sales tax – $24

TOTAL - $294

DIY

MT16 80/100x21 - $65

Michelin UHD tube - $20

Installation - $0

Tire irons - $15

Maxxis IT 100/100x18 - $55

Michelin UHD tube - $20

Installation - $0

NYS sales tax – $0

TOTAL - $175

SAVINGS - $119

It's really not that hard. Plus, I've got tire irons for when I need to fix flats on the trail. :thumbsup: (A buddy recently got two flats in two days :ride: ).

You can't buy your tires at the dealership, that is just not smart. Rocky mountain, and then brink your old wheel and the new tire to the shop. Some get pissed, but mine doesn't care.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
When you are 30 miles from the truck on a rocky singletrack you need to know how to change your tires.

You really change tires in the middle of nowhere? Where do carry a spare tire?

Yes everyone should learn to do a trailside patch job.

I carry a 21 inch tube that can be used in the front or the rear.

When I replace a rear tire it stays on till it's done.

I will swap out the front for different conditions but as a rule I find the front about 90% easier to change than the rear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0