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morewoops

tire alignment

10 posts in this topic

Does anyone have a set and true way to measure and make sure that the rear tire, and the front tire are in perfect alignment with each other?

This is why I ask, we bought a brand new 650 R, and couldn't figure out why it kept throwing itself to the left when going through a hole, after many hours of scratching our heads, we came to the conclusion that the swing arm was an 1/8 in. longer on the right side than on the left. This could be from it not being welded at the factory right, either way its off.

Another finding is that the frame stretches and could be up to an 1-1/2 in. longer than stock if it realy gets rode hard, ya might want to check that when buying one, used.

any input is appreciated. :ride:

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Another finding is that the frame stretches and could be up to an 1-1/2 in. longer than stock if it realy gets rode hard, ya might want to check that when buying one, used.

That's one of the most ridiculous things I've ever heard.

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I was always told that you can't trust the markings for the chain alignment so I have tried measuring the center of rear axle to Swing arm pivot point, I have tried measuring the Rim to the inside of the swing arm to make that equal but that isn't my usuall. I used to just eyeball it down the chain or occasionally I would lay a straight edge along the sprocket and chain and that gets me close assuming the sprocket is still straight...One time I didn't tighten the axle well and it got a very little off and it wore the axle bearings in one weekend ride....So I'd double-check that often especially if you think you rode it with it caddy-wompous.

I'm intrested to see what the proper technique is...After wearing the bearings I don't rely on eyeballing it anymore and straight edge is my norm.

JT

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If you can't find the solution here, I'd do some snooping around on custom built (chopper or otherwise) motorcycle sites. I'm currently running into a similar problem with a custom supermoto I'm building with CBR F3 wheels on a dirtbike, trying to get proper alignment between the front and rear wheels with the custom spacers I'm machining. I'm sure there are some tricks that those guys use, although admittantly I haven't found them yet.

On a side note, Parts does sell a laser alignment tool that can do the job in about two minutes. However, it retails at ~$1300. :ride:

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If you can't find the solution here, I'd do some snooping around on custom built (chopper or otherwise) motorcycle sites. I'm currently running into a similar problem with a custom supermoto I'm building with CBR F3 wheels on a dirtbike, trying to get proper alignment between the front and rear wheels with the custom spacers I'm machining. I'm sure there are some tricks that those guys use, although admittantly I haven't found them yet.

On a side note, Parts does sell a laser alignment tool that can do the job in about two minutes. However, it retails at ~$1300. :ride:

i did that wheel conversion you are talking about and have no problem with tire alignment or handling. i just eye balled the front one and got it centered with washers and the rear tire is off-set a little bit so the chain doesn't rub. standing the bike upa nd hitting bumps has never jarred me over to the same side all the time. i honestly don't think front to rear tire alignment is his problem. i can see the rear wheel being cocked being a problem but not front to rear alignment.

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I was looking for the tool that we use on our race cars and came across this website. I have not read the instructions yet but it looks like a similar method we use for race cars adapted to a street bike

http://www.yamahafz1oa.com/sportryderswheelalignmentmethod.shtml

Good Luck

BTW how do you figure the frame can be up to 1 1/2" longer. The wheel base can be 1 1/2" shorter if you bent your forks but the frame.........

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That's what happened to this guy, he rode the bike real hard.

DSC05254-Holt-600.jpg:ride:

Is that Al Jolson's son behind him?

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thank those of you for the insite, i'll check into the alighnment tools and check some street bike stuff. as for the frame, yes, they DO stretch, and they can stretch up to an 1-1/2. Ours has stretched 7/8, try measuring your 650 and compare what the stock wheelbase in the book is.

BTW these #'s are from factory Honda riders.

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If the frame alignment is off by only a small amount the swingarm pivot to rear axle measurement will be off as well. The best way to align wheels is by visually sighting along the two tires, first from the front to back then back to front and adjust accordingly.

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