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hypersthenos

DIY stator rewind on XRR?

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Okay so I've spent the last half hr searching for info on how to rewind the stock stator on my '00 XRR for more output. I've read a few posts which state it's not all that difficult. I feel I could do with it with good detailed guidelins. I have the BD DS kit & am not looking to add anything else but handwarmers & possible a higher output bulb for the headlight. Anyone out there got any suggestions?

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http://www.xr650r.us/stator/

I used this as a guideline when I rewound mine.

You do have several options here. Baja Designs will rewind your stator for ~$125, but you have to send it in to them, and then you have to grind out the stator cover for clearance of their FAT winds. Another option is Ricky Stator , he sells a complete stator, already rewound, that is a bolt in replacement of your stock stator for ~$150. You can then turn around and sell your stocker on Ebay for $40-100 depending.

The Ricky Stator setup is the best deal. Both (Baja and Ricky) of these coils are dual coil and will require the use of the stock regulator, in addition to the reg/rec that you are using with your DS kit.

Finally you can wind your own as per the instructions in the link. I have a standard Baja Designs DS kit on my '00 650R.

Over the years since that article was written, research has shown that there are better ways to wind the stator. For ~125W of output (about 2x the stock output), it is recommended to strip the stock lighting coil windings (NOT THE IGNITION COIL) and rewind all available 10 poles with 18awg magnet wire, approximately 32-34 wraps per pole, giving a total of 320-340 turns over 10 poles. This is a single coil, and will plug right into your standard regulator/rectifier just like your stock stator does, nor will you have to grind out your stator cover. For optimal lighting output, and to keep your battery charged, it's recommended to stick with a 55/60W headlight (plus standard brake/tail lights). Going with a larger bulb than this while using grip heaters (depending on the actual wattage of your grip heaters) *might* not allow the battery to charge.

If you NEED 100W+ of lighting you can do a single 200W+ rewind. However, this opens up a whole can of worms that makes it a pain in the arse. It becomes questionable at this point how well the stock wiring and Baja Designs DS kit wiring and handlebar switch can handle the higher current of this setup. Safety dictates that the wiring should be upgraded and the handlebar switch bypassed. Furthermore, the BD regulator/rectifier is only rated for ~150W, so you will have to keep a load on the stator at all times (IE your headlight runs on AC from the stator and can't be turned off, just like the stock bike). This winding uses 16awg magnet wire, again wrapped over 10 poles, 32-34 turns per pole, total 320-340 turns. I used this winding to power dual 55W headlights (110W) as well as my standard BD DS kit with excellent results. However, I had to upgrade some wiring, AND my headlights run off the stator and are always on.

In summary, none of this is an exact science, so your mileage will vary. For the most part the article in the link is what you follow except for the actual winding. He added a new coil in series onto the stock coil, where I'm talking about stripping the stock coil and winding a new coil with fatter magnet wire. The total number of turns in a coil is important (320-340 turns total) as this is what determines the induced voltage and internal coil resistance (which fight each other). The 320-340 total turns has been found to be a good # giving high induced voltage but at low internal coil resistance.

Buy your magnet wire here; http://www.bulkwire.com/product.asp?ProdID=7606

a 1lb roll will be plenty.

As for the epoxy to seal up the coil, this is the two part stuff that you can buy at Lowe's, Home Depot, auto parts stores, Wal Mart etc... You want to get the ~5 min drying time stuff that is waterproof and has the highest temperature rating, ~200deg.

You will also need a soldering iron to make good connections from your stator coil to the wiring that goes up to the seat.

The DIY wind is not hard, but it will take some time. If you screw up, you won't ruin anything, just strip the coil and start over. If all else fails, you can always buy the Ricky Stator complete stator.

When you consider that you can get a fair price for a stock stator on Ebay, the Ricky Stator setup is the quickest/easiest solution IF you are using a 100W headlight or LESS and don't mind making room for the stock regulator in addition to your BD regulator/rectifier.

Feel free to contact me directly if you need more info...

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Nice post. That info almost gives me the confidence to rewind my own stator and that's not an option I was really considering very hard...

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Thanks very much for the time you spent answering mu question. As I have not yet ridden my bike at night with the stock stator & Baja Des. headlight setup I think I'll try it before making changes. One other question I have is will the stock stator output be adequate for the use of handwarmers in conjuction with the original headlight that came with the Baja DS kit? Will placing too much load cause any damage. Thanks in advance.

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The stock 35W headlight and standard Baja Designs kit will work fine, and the battery will stay charged. Adding your grip heaters to this system won't hurt anything necesarily, but more than likely it will discharge your battery. Depending on the wattage of your grip heaters, you *may* be able to get away with it if you only use the grip heaters while the bike is at speed (power output increases with RPM). You will need to turn them off when riding slow or coming to a stop, and definitely before you use turn signals.

What it boils down to is this; Your battery needs 13-14VDC to stay charged. As you increase the load on your stator, the voltage drops. If the voltage drops to ~12.5VDC or less then it will discharge and not be able to charge back up. So, your stator has to be able to handle all your normal loads and have enough extra to keep your battery charged.

If your grip heaters are ~30W, and you stick with the stock 35W headlight, the 18 awg winding, total of ~320 turns over 10 poles should be fine and you should be able to leave your grip heaters on when at a stop light with your turnsignals on and not discharge the battery. Using this setup with a 55/60W bulb is right on the borderline and may or may not work, maybe only if you run the grip heaters when the bike is at speed. It's too hard to say, you would just have to try it.

If your grip heaters are higher wattage, AND you want a 55/60W bulb, AND you want to run the grip heaters at any time, then the larger 16awg wind would be more appropriate. Recall, this will require quite a bit more work on your part and the bike's stock electrical system.

If the later is the case, and you are not a big DIY 'er, then you'd be very pleased to simply buy the Ricky Stator setup ~$150 and have two circuits, one AC circuit and one DC circuit. Again, sell your stock stator for ~$60+ and this makes the price of the Ricky Stator very attractive and you don't have to get deep into your bikes wiring system. This setup will give you some extra to play with, like powering a GPS , or a radiator fan, or heated jacket etc... Good luck.

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Again, thanks for your answer. Sounds like an upgrade will be necessary. I feel confident that I can do the rewind myself but that being said it seems like money well spent for thr ricky stator setup-not all that much money. If I was saving a couple hundred I might consider it. One dillema I may have is that I don't think I have the original regulator so may have to source one.

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You will need another regulator, but not a regulator/rectifier. As mentioned, the Ricky Stator has two windings. Typically, one winding will plug into your reg/rec and run your DSK just like your running now. The other winding usually runs through the stock regulator (or any regulator) and simply supplies AC voltage to the headlight, enough for about 100W.

Your grip heaters or other accesories will operate off of the the DC side and run off your battery.

Ricky has got a 225W regulator for $19...

http://www.rickystator.com/pages/AC_Voltage_Regulator.html

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Excellent and accurate post/reply snaggle! Thanks, as I am in the same boat and am opting for the dual output Ricky stator for my Motard as I ride in on the street and need more light! I have an Acerbis Diamond whihc looks cool but sucks in the output department. Ill proibably go with the Cyclops and put an HID in the biig hole. I heard the ricky stator will give me two 100w= outputs and I have the BD rec/reg and two extra regulators off the stock XR I took off to install the BD unit. I will run the lights off AC and the rest off the BD system since I don;t need hand warmers here in the desert!

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You will need another regulator, but not a regulator/rectifier. As mentioned, the Ricky Stator has two windings. Typically, one winding will plug into your reg/rec and run your DSK just like your running now. The other winding usually runs through the stock regulator (or any regulator) and simply supplies AC voltage to the headlight, enough for about 100W.

Your grip heaters or other accesories will operate off of the the DC side and run off your battery.

Ricky has got a 225W regulator for $19...

http://www.rickystator.com/pages/AC_Voltage_Regulator.html

Snice you are knowlegeable about this I was wondering if what I heard was true. Are the stators for 89-99 XR600Rs all compatable? I heard they were. At least till 92-93? I have a freind who has a high output stator from a 89XR600R and was wondering if itll work on my 92XR600R...thanks snaggle, very good information you have here!

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Tough to tell. More than likely yes, but there were some changes made in the late 80's. I'm pretty sure the mid 90's bikes were all compatible, XR250, 400, and 600. The 650L is definitely different.

It's easy to get to the stator in the left side engine cover. Best way would be to just try it.

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Thanks, the reason I ask is I am going to order a stator from Ricky stator for the 92 and was wondering if it would also work on my 96, plus, I found a killer deal on a 210w one for a 89 for $25.00 in working condition, the guy is parting the bike. I am going to buy it for the 92 and if it works, Ill use the new Rickystator on the supermoto (96). Thanks again.

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Thanks, the reason I ask is I am going to order a stator from Ricky stator for the 92 and was wondering if it would also work on my 96, plus, I found a killer deal on a 210w one for a 89 for $25.00 in working condition, the guy is parting the bike. I am going to buy it for the 92 and if it works, Ill use the new Rickystator on the supermoto (96). Thanks again.

The stators for all years of the XR600 are interchangeable.

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Beware of the older XR stators. They were notorious for the ignitions going bad. Stick with 92' or newer. I think it needs to be mentioned that the aftermarket stators(Ricky Stator, Electrosport, etc.) lack the reliability of the stock stator with a rewind(lighting coils only). When you are miles from nowhere it would be nice to not have to worry about if you chinese or taiwan ignition is going to leave you stranded. Just something to consider.

BTX Mini

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Okay I'm back. Just picked up 100' of 18g magnet wire. I hope that's enough as I couldn't rememer how much a 1lb roll holds. Figuring each winding is approx 3" for 320 turns seems to work out at under 100'. If not I guess I'll order more next time! If 100' is enough I'll be happy as it only cost me $15. I've read all the threads on rewinding my stator & it doesn't sound all that tough. The only variation is the amount of windings/amount of poles. Snaggle, as you've provided the most up-to-date recommendations I'm sticking with you, bud. So that's 32-34 windings per pole over 10 poles after stripping the stock windings from the lighting coil. Sounds pretty straightforward. I'll let you know how it turns out. Thanks again.

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Congrats on the decision to wind it yourself.

To start off, take pictures, or make drawings of how the wires route on the stator itself. This is important, as you will have to emulate this.

Strip the stock winding (4 poles), be careful not to mess with the other 2 poles and assoctiated wiring, this is your ignition coil. Look for and clean off any excess epoxy on the 10 poles, so that you will have plenty of room for your new winding.

Leave about 6-8" of extra hanging out by where the wires go up to the seat so you have something to work with when you are done. Start out by zigzagging through all the way to the 10th pole, keep the wire routing tight. Start winding, aim for 34 turns per pole, but 32 or 33 is just fine. Keep your winds tight and laying neatly next to eachother, a vice will help. When you get to 29 or 30 turns start winding back down to the base of each pole so that you can cross over to the next pole. EACH POLE SHOULD BE WOUND IN AN ALTERNATING DIRECTION!!!! KEEP THE WINDS NEAT AND TIGHT!!!

When you are done, you need to solder your two ends of your new coil to the wires that go up to the seat. There is a clear plastic insulation covering on the magnet wire. This will have to carefully scraped off with a knife before you solder. Make sure the rubber grommet that seals the case where the wires exit is still in the proper place.

At this point, if you have your winding wound securely, you can pop it back in your bike and try it briefly to make sure it works. You should be able to notice that your headlight is kinda bright even at idle, this means you did a good job. Further checking would include reading the voltage right before the battery while your headlight, grip heaters etc. are on. You HAVE to have ~13-14VDC to keep the battery charged, if you have >12VDC at idle with all your loads running (not necesarily turnsignals) then you are perfect and will NEVER have a dead battery.

After everything checks out, go get some ~5min epoxy, usually comes in dual syringes, water resistant and high temp. ~200 deg. This stuff can be found at Lowe's/Home Depot, autoparts, Walmart in the automotive etc... I bought some tiny paint brushes to apply it. Coat all the exposed areas of the coil generously, don't glob it on, just make sure there is a protective "shell" around all the winds. The 650R doesn't have an oil bath in the left side case like other bikes have, so the epoxy really just keeps the coil from coming undone and unwinding and from getting moisture on it.

Let us know how it comes out. Also beware, without knowing what wattage your grip heaters are, you may still run your battery down if you keep them on along with your headlight at idle for a period of time.

If your old battery doesn't seem to take a charge with the new coil, don't strip the coil, try a new battery pack. Your old battery pack sounds like it may be on it's last leg...

Good luck.

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One more thing, use a multimeter to check the Ohms or resistance in the coil. Make sure the clear coating is scraped off at the ends. Simply touch each probe to each end of the coil. I had ~.2 Ohms on my 16awg winding. I'm guessing that you should have ~.4-.6 Ohms or less. The stock coil is like .7 Ohms+. If you get something like 1 Ohm or more then there is a problem with your coil. The lower the Ohms, the more current that can flow through the coil, lower is better.

Also, check your regulator/rectifier to make sure it doesn't get too warm after running the bike for a while. Mine doesn't seem to even get warm. If it gets hot quickly, something isn't right. Good luck.

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Okay so I've unwound the stock lighting coils. In your post you say to wound around all the poles with the firts wire and start at the 10th pole. That's the opposite of how the stock windings were. It starts winding and the first pole & finishes at the last then winds around and back to exit at the harness. Your way seems easier & should not make a difference right? Does it matter which wire is hooked up at the loom? This shouln't make a difference either I'm assuming. Thanks!

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It doesn't matter which way it's wound, a coil is a coil, with the exception of alternating the winding direction at each coil. As for which end of the coil goes to which wire, that doesn't matter either, we are dealing with AC voltage, not DC. Also recall that the input wires on your reg/rec are both yellow, and no distiction is made between them. Keep us updated...

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Beware of the older XR stators. They were notorious for the ignitions going bad. Stick with 92' or newer. I think it needs to be mentioned that the aftermarket stators(Ricky Stator, Electrosport, etc.) lack the reliability of the stock stator with a rewind(lighting coils only). When you are miles from nowhere it would be nice to not have to worry about if you chinese or taiwan ignition is going to leave you stranded. Just something to consider.

BTX Mini

I have a 93 and my ignition coil on the stator went bad. I got a spool of 33 gage wire and rewound it my self. It's been working for 2 years. Since my hand wind really sucked compared to the original machine wind, I'm very concerned about it going bad again. In fact I expect it to happen. However, I have come up with an emergency solution. The lighting coil makes plenty of juice, but the voltage it to low to run the ignition.

I tried several different approaches to get the high voltage necessary to operate the ignition. The simplest solution is to just use a transformer. I carry a small 12VAC wall transformer. When it fails all I have to do is take off the seat and connect the 12 volt side to the stator and the 120v wall side to the ignition. Works great. This does operate the transformer way out of it's design as the frequency can go way higher than 60Hz. I've tested it and it appears to work fine. I will only use it for an emergency make it back to the truck purposes and the rpms need to be kept as low as possible.

With a proper audio transformer, it should be possible only use the lighting stator for the ignition voltage.

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Allright, the windings are done. Wasn't that tough. I now understand what you meant about starting @ the 10th pole & working backwards. The windings come out the same either way. Anyway it doesn't look too bad if I do say so myself! All that's needed is an ohm test & epoxy & it's done. Since I have to go but a new tester (one I have has a broken battery lead) I hooked the windings up to the harness, soldering them in place. It actually looks factory. Anyway I'll just test for ohms at the end of the harness. If it does need redone all I have to do is unsolder. For anyone out there looking to do this, 50 ft. of wire will do for 32 windings over all 10 poles. At the local supply house this would have cost only $7.50 as it can be ordered by the foot where I bought mine. One other thing I did which seemed to help alot is to provide a way for the wire spool to rotate on 2 axes by running a dowel throught the spool, wraping wire around each end of the dowe. in a V shape and hanging the center of the V wire on a swivel from by tackle box & hanging this on an arm over my workbench about 2 feet above the work area. This worked great & minimized the chance of twisting or chafing the magnet wire. I'll replace my multimeter & get epoxy tomorrow & see how it goes. If you're careful in noting the stock wire routing & carefully unsolder the connectors to the stock lighting coil this really is not that tough. Hey, Snaggle, got any other cool little mods like this? I really enjoy this kind of project. Thanks again.

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