Beware of Wide "X or O" Ring Chings on 06

Ordered a Primary Drive 520 X Ring chain to replace the lovely stocker. I had heard about the fatter chains hitting the case but this chain didn't hit the case so I thought that I was OK until I saw this,

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a270/briggl/chiangrind2.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a270/briggl/chaingrind1.jpg :excuseme::bonk::busted::bonk: after about 8 rides. Major grinding on the inside of the frame just below the sub frame connection. Before the flaming starts I religiously kept the chain tension in spec and usually a hair on the tight side. So I called Rocky Mountain and they said that they would take the fat chain back and replace it with the same chain without the X rings. You may want to check your bikes if you are running a wider chain. I am thinking about crafting some kind of steel guard plate that I can bolt onto the frame by way of the opposite side of the subframe bolt hole. Any fix suggestions are appreciated.

1 reason I only use standard great quality non - oring xring or z-ring chains............and Ironman Sprockets - :excuseme:

That's the reason I run only high quality Regina O-ring or Z-ring chains. They don't have to make up for inferior materials by making the plates thicker. I would imagine that any chain subject to much wear would do that to some extent eventually. You might want to carefully check the rear wheel alignment. The marks on the blocks are not always right.

I'll keep an eye on mine, though. I see another Grayracer wear plate in the offing. :excuseme:

Like Gray said check your alignment. Make sure the chain you are using is rated for the right CC.

Ordered a Primary Drive 520 X Ring chain to replace the lovely stocker. I had heard about the fatter chains hitting the case but this chain didn't hit the case so I thought that I was OK until I saw this,

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a270/briggl/chiangrind2.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a270/briggl/chaingrind1.jpg :excuseme::bonk::busted::bonk: after about 8 rides. Major grinding on the inside of the frame just below the sub frame connection. Before the flaming starts I religiously kept the chain tension in spec and usually a hair on the tight side. So I called Rocky Mountain and they said that they would take the fat chain back and replace it with the same chain without the X rings. You may want to check your bikes if you are running a wider chain. I am thinking about crafting some kind of steel guard plate that I can bolt onto the frame by way of the opposite side of the subframe bolt hole. Any fix suggestions are appreciated.

I have a REGINA o-ring on mine, no frame slap that I can find!

Also, turn your masterlink around so the clip is on the inside. The chain is usually a little wider at that point.

is it just x ring chains?or is it all oring chains/

Less expensive chains like Primary Drive sometimes substitute mass for high strength materials as a way of achieving a satisfactory level of strength. All sealed chains are slightly wider than their non-sealed counterparts because the seals have to go somewhere. Cheaper chains exaggerate this problem by adding thicker plates on top of the already wider chains. Mine hasn't hit at this point, but we've only ridden it once. Like I said, I'll watch it, but it seems to have adequate room.

Rear wheel alignment is important for a number of reasons. Among those is that when the bike is coasting or decelerating, the top run of chain will be "thrown" off the rear sprocket and toward the front in pretty much whatever direction it's pointed by its own inertia. If the sprocket side is set too far back, that means it will be pointed at the frame.

Thats crazy! Thanks for the post man, I just checked mine and its rubbing there too :excuseme: I have an EK Quadra X-Ring chain on mine, and I like the chain since it needs little adjustment and has 0 chain slap that I can here. I think we need to take a count here of guys with the 2006 and see who is having this problem and with what chains. I bet the stock chain slaps around enough to mark the frame too, but it would be nice to see what chains rub and what ones don't. So go check your frames out people and let us know! I'm glad you pointed this out before mine got real bad.. Thanks :bonk:

Ordered a Primary Drive 520 X Ring chain to replace the lovely stocker. I had heard about the fatter chains hitting the case but this chain didn't hit the case so I thought that I was OK until I saw this,

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a270/briggl/chiangrind2.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a270/briggl/chaingrind1.jpg :excuseme::bonk::busted::bonk: after about 8 rides. Major grinding on the inside of the frame just below the sub frame connection. Before the flaming starts I religiously kept the chain tension in spec and usually a hair on the tight side. So I called Rocky Mountain and they said that they would take the fat chain back and replace it with the same chain without the X rings. You may want to check your bikes if you are running a wider chain. I am thinking about crafting some kind of steel guard plate that I can bolt onto the frame by way of the opposite side of the subframe bolt hole. Any fix suggestions are appreciated.

Stock chain does that too which is why I changed it to a DID Xring. I have had no problems since actually.

I have an 04 yz450f and my subframe is tore to shit because of a shitty chain the guy i bought it from had on it. It was so bad it also hit the side of my tire and wore it out. My question is what is the best way to align your rear wheel with out using the marks, i think mine are off. thanks

There are tools you can buy that will make it easier to do with the chain on, but you can do this:

>Either disconnect the chain at the master link, or pull the axle and roll the chain off both sprockets, then put the axle back in.

>Clamp a straight rod long enough to reach the front sprocket to the side of the rear sprocket.

> Move the chain adjusters to get the rod on the rear sprocket to just touch the side of the front sprocket. Note any difference between the hash marks on the two sides, and bear that difference in mind when doing chain adjustments in the future.

You can also sight down the chain from the rear while holding pressure on the bottom run to keep it tight, but it's more difficult to be precise. Look for any change of direction in the chain plates at the point where the chain rolls off the rear sprocket.

I have an 04 yz450f and my subframe is tore to shit because of a shitty chain the guy i bought it from had on it. It was so bad it also hit the side of my tire and wore it out. My question is what is the best way to align your rear wheel with out using the marks, i think mine are off. thanks

The simplest (and most common) way to see if your rear wheel is lined up straight is to measure from the swingarm pivot bolt to the axle bolt on both sides.

The simplest (and most common) way to see if your rear wheel is lined up straight is to measure from the swingarm pivot bolt to the axle bolt on both sides.

Or you can measure the length of the adjuster bolts with a set of calipers. Thanks for posting this, I'm just getting ready to install an RK X-ring on my 06 so I'll keep an eye on this.

Or you can measure the length of the adjuster bolts with a set of calipers. Thanks for posting this, I'm just getting ready to install an RK X-ring on my 06 so I'll keep an eye on this.

The way I locate the rear wheel is, I take my standard tire gauge

and pull the indicator stick out, then, I place the end against the adjuster block and push the gauge in till it hits the end of the swing arm. Then I have a known indicator for BOTH sides of the axle.

Good luck interpreting this post.

I smell what you're stepping in Blaster... good idea if you don't have a set of calipers around.

I use a standard 12' steel measuring tape. I put the end of the measuring tape against the swingarm where the chain adjuster bolt screws into the swingarm and then measure to the leading (or trailing end will work) edge of the chain adjuster block. I never use the alignment marks on the swingarm they are usually off.

Also, turn your masterlink around so the clip is on the inside. The chain is usually a little wider at that point.

That sounds like a good idea, I didn't notice that. I just checked and my stock chain has been eating my frame too. I'm gonna hafta make up a guard for sure.

Thanks for posting about this issue Troutman.

That sounds like a good idea, I didn't notice that. I just checked and my stock chain has been eating my frame too. I'm gonna hafta make up a guard for sure.

Thanks for posting about this issue Troutman.

No problem! Thats the purpose of this great site. It feels good to help out the fellow TT'ers who have helped me out sooo many times, (especially the YZF crew). I think I caught the destruction in time and now its off to the races to see who comes up with the best solution. I think my wheel alignment is fine but I am going to check it anyway and after that start fabricating some type of guard. Does anyone know of a commercially made frame guard/guide for the inside of the frame? or do I smell a business opportunity?

No problem! Thats the purpose of this great site. It feels good to help out the fellow TT'ers who have helped me out sooo many times, (especially the YZF crew). I think I caught the destruction in time and now its off to the races to see who comes up with the best solution. I think my wheel alignment is fine but I am going to check it anyway and after that start fabricating some type of guard. Does anyone know of a commercially made frame guard/guide for the inside of the frame? or do I smell a business opportunity?

Ya, you should go into business making guards for the fix.. and I'll be your first customer!

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