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philipstjohn

Suspension upgrades for 650R Send out or do it yourself?

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I am 6'2", and 225 lbs. I realize the 650R is really not set up for me. What should I do? Buy the parts, and do it myself, or send the job out to one of the shops to tune for my needs? It seems pretty expensive if you send it out, but will it be worth the extra expense to have a "expert" do it vs a first time do it yourselfer? Please let me know if you have any experiences on this subject. Thanks

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I went with Precision Concepts for a variety of reasons, but mainly because I lack the experience and equipment to rebuild and modify suspension internals competently, and I wanted to go with a company that was experienced with the BRP and its suspension components. There really aren't that many shops out there specializing in traditional right-side-up forks.

I don't use the bike in its intended element, rather I ride tight single track and whooped-out trail. And I am very pleased with the revalving, stiffer springs and set-up advise I rec'd from PC.

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I ordered heavy weight front & rear springs from Eibach and fitted them myself. Not a major job and has made all the difference in the world.

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I am 6'2", and 225 lbs. I realize the 650R is really not set up for me. What should I do? Buy the parts, and do it myself, or send the job out to one of the shops to tune for my needs? It seems pretty expensive if you send it out, but will it be worth the extra expense to have a "expert" do it vs a first time do it yourselfer? Please let me know if you have any experiences on this subject. Thanks

Sending them out to be 'done' is really custom work involving special shim stacks that they create for your weight and riding style, besides changing the springs. You can get 90% there and plenty good for MOST of us by just getting the appropriate springs for your weight and replacing those. That's what I'm going to do.

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I am 6'2", and 225 lbs. I realize the 650R is really not set up for me. What should I do? Buy the parts, and do it myself, or send the job out to one of the shops to tune for my needs? It seems pretty expensive if you send it out, but will it be worth the extra expense to have a "expert" do it vs a first time do it yourselfer? Please let me know if you have any experiences on this subject. Thanks

Send it out, every penny you can afford on suspension is money well spent, you won't be dissapointed!!!!

They will dial it to the terrain you ride, weight and skill level!

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I ordered heavy weight front & rear springs from Eibach and fitted them myself. Not a major job and has made all the difference in the world.

As said in the post above, the springs do a lot towards getting the right geometry, but they don't really do anything for the whole suspension package.

I had just done springs and called it good until I went to Baja :busted::bonk:

got back, stripped the suspension down and sent it to someone who know what they were doing :excuseme::bonk:

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My opinion is this:

If you are re-valving your suspension, let the experts handle it. These guys do it day in and day out, and 9 times out of 10 they will set it up way better than you can. Pay the $ and have it done. If you are up for it, take the suspension off the bike and bring it in, you will save some cash that way. By going to your local professional, you build a relationship with someone in the offroad/racing community. You are also supporting this great hobby. :excuseme:

After you get your suspension re-valved, you can change the oil yourself, it's pretty easy to do. Once you get profficient at it, you can start messing with oil viscocity, oil height, etc. to taylor your bike to your type of riding. The important thing is to have the proper tools and work within your ability. Today's service manuals are pretty good, and anyone mechanically inclined can usually do most of the easy jobs. Plus, it's good to get your hands dirty every once in a while....... :bonk:

-RC

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Actualy if you have a good concept of what the valve/shim stack is doing and what you want it to do, and you can fallow instructions you can do it as good as any suspension guy. Maybe better. Never as fast. Most don't use a torque wrench, just grind the nut off flat, use cheap fluids and leave lint and dust between the shims. I know I take theirs apart all the time. I have watched them put them together. They get treated as magicians having some top secret shim stack that they only have. If you do not have the time to know/find out what you are doing. Then don't do it. If you are willing to read all you can and know that you understand what is happening and what you want to happen, then you can do as good or better job! That is the truth.

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Heres a hi-jack question.......... kinda-sorta

About how much does Precision Concepts charge to set up the suspension on a 650R? That may be my next trick.

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$850 for front and back

Ouch

Sounds like if someone has some mechanical talent and good understanding of the way suspension should work, they can save a boatload of money :excuseme:

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Actualy if you have a good concept of what the valve/shim stack is doing and what you want it to do, and you can fallow instructions you can do it as good as any suspension guy. Maybe better. Never as fast. Most don't use a torque wrench, just grind the nut off flat, use cheap fluids and leave lint and dust between the shims. I know I take theirs apart all the time. I have watched them put them together. They get treated as magicians having some top secret shim stack that they only have. If you do not have the time to know/find out what you are doing. Then don't do it. If you are willing to read all you can and know that you understand what is happening and what you want to happen, then you can do as good or better job! That is the truth.

I agree completely :excuseme:

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Actualy if you have a good concept of what the valve/shim stack is doing and what you want it to do, and you can fallow instructions you can do it as good as any suspension guy. Maybe better. Never as fast. Most don't use a torque wrench, just grind the nut off flat, use cheap fluids and leave lint and dust between the shims. I know I take theirs apart all the time. I have watched them put them together. They get treated as magicians having some top secret shim stack that they only have. If you do not have the time to know/find out what you are doing. Then don't do it. If you are willing to read all you can and know that you understand what is happening and what you want to happen, then you can do as good or better job! That is the truth.

If your suspension guy is that shady, than definitley do it yourself. My suspension guy is a friend of mine that I ride and race with, so I know he does everything the right way, and doesn't charge $850!!! That's flippin insane! I better be able to huck my bike off a mountain and not feel a thing for that price!

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Well, PC does Team Honda 's race bikes for the Score (Baja races) and BITD races bikes For the top teams. The are now famous and are asking the money for it. Not my suspension guy, he better not be shady (I hope not.....because it's me) but, I am talking some of the top name suspension shops here in California. PC has turned out the best in the ones I have taken apart. But, some of the others that are hailed here on this group have sucked! One from Baja designs had a shaft nut with no threads (How they could have torqued it is a mystery) and the nut came off with the rider doing over 60mph through small whoops. He broke his neck. They had to fuse it operating from the front and the back of his neck. Sad story! I have the shock. I have taken several XR650R suspensions apart that have been done by one of the guys that use to hang out here and the nuts are just flat ground off the shaft, dirt between the shims, transmission fluid. What a joke. The guy that paid $650 front and back to have it done, I think he could have done better just guessing at what he was doing. It's not rocket science. There is enough info out there to know what you are doing now. If you don't know what you are doing, it is very important that you don't or at least find someone who can check your work or you can ask question but, if you can get the idea of what shims do what, keep everything perfectly clean, use a torque wrench, make sure you get the air out of the oil (in the shock) use nitrogen (for the shock) then you are reading to take a stab at it. First time will be major time consuming but, after a few times it goes fast. I hope that the XR650R suspension page gets up dated with how to test you shock for a leaking bladder and test it once done. There are a lot of info on the links from those pages on how to take the shock and fork apart.

http://xr650r.borynack.com/

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I'm in the middle of doing mine myself. Started it a long time ago, but got side-tracked and haven't been riding. But not because it's a difficult job- it isn't. Bruce has excellent instructions on his website, and I've ridden a bike with settings that worked fantastic for me. I had mine done by another guy who's popular and well-respected on this site (for the most part). Bill was over $650, but that included springs, and I got it back really quick, as I was taking a trip the day I got it back. It was better than stock, but I've since ridden several bikes that are WAY better. I like the PC mods a lot, but to be honest, I couldn't tell much difference between a full-on PC bike and the bike with Bruce's mods. I have three sets of forks & I'm gonna try different valve stacks in a couple of 'em, just to see the difference. Once you've done it & seen how easy it is, you'll wonder what the fuss is all about.

Thanks for all your help, Bruce. You're the MAN!

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Thanks, I have a big head now. Alot of the fork compression setups (from suspension shops) have been two stage setups in the past. I am finding more and more going to a single stage setup in the fork compression valve and getting better resaults with the thinner fluid and drilling the valve out. The two stage setup (cross over shim) is two much of a compromise and you lose to much resistance to big hits with a sluggish quick hit responce. (Hope that makes sense) Stock is a single stage stack.

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