baja designs regulator/rectifier

I just bought a regulator/rectifier from baja designs.

I am going to make some DC power with a ni-cad I bought to run my GPS unit. I have a question about the regulator/rectifier. I thought it would only have 4 wires, but came with 5.

I am not sure what to do with the 5th wire. I know the two yellows go to the stator, the red to positive battery, black to ground, but where does the blue go??

Good question. The standard Baja Designs dual sport kit reg/rec that I have is only 4 wires, two yellow and black/red for DC output. I would just wire it up not using the blue and see what happens. Use a volt meter to test the output (~12VDC on the red/black wires) BEFORE hooking up your GPS or whatever.

Better yet, call Baja Designs and ask what the blue wire is for. Good luck.

I have the Baja Designs regulator/rectifier (with 5 wires) on my XR650R. There should be a schematic diagram printed on the side of the housing. The blue wire goes to the negative side of the battery. The black wire goes to negative side of the load (floated ground on my XR).

my blue runs to the battery (black) so the red and blue go to battery

I'll see if i can get a diagram, darn, all thier diag's only have the two yellow

one black and one red wire types.... strange.

Best bet will be to call BD, they are very helpfull folks and will set you straight.

What do you guys mean with a floating ground? I haven't really understood that concept.

Basically I installed the regulator/rectifier in the same location of the stock regulator. Then I disregarded the blue wire. I only want my battery to pull load for the gps. So I connected the two yellow wires to the original yellow and brown wires. Then I took the red wire and connected it to the battery, and spliced in my positive lead for the gps in line with the battery. With the black wire off of the rectifier I grounded it to the frame, grounded the black wire from battery to the frame, and the ground wire to the gps to the frame.

I started the bike up and it gives a nice constant voltage, so it seems to be running right. However my headlight is really dim. I was thinking that since the battery was low on charge that it was using up most of my power to charge it. I didnt even touch the wiring to the headlight or tailight, cause I wanted it to stay in AC. What do you guys think? Do you think once the battery gets charged up my headlight will brighten up? If I look real close to the light it brightens slightly when the throttle is used.

So let me know if this set up sounds good, or what the floating ground set up is.

I too want to understand what a floating ground is.

I believe the "floating ground" he's talking about is the common side coming out of the regulator.

But I might be wrong.

WiringDiagramV3.gif

I talked to baja designs about this and they the blue wire isn't necessary at all. I just ran it to ground and never had a problem.

I started the bike up and it gives a nice constant voltage, so it seems to be running right. However my headlight is really dim. I was thinking that since the battery was low on charge that it was using up most of my power to charge it. I didnt even touch the wiring to the headlight or tailight, cause I wanted it to stay in AC. What do you guys think? Do you think once the battery gets charged up my headlight will brighten up? If I look real close to the light it brightens slightly when the throttle is used.

run the blue to the battery black (-) and the red to the Battery Red (+)

then the rest is normal, black out of Rectifier to system ground, two input yellows

from the Stator. this is the way mine came wired from BD. Head light was

nice and bright.

I seem to remember the blue wire was a ground as well, whats it hooked to on the regulator? I remember there was a black wire which was yed to the blue..is this like yours? If it is and the blue wire has a loop connector on it it is a frame ground. If it is a female post type connector let me know where it is comming from and ill tell you where it goes. I have the same thing on my XR600 so Ill look tonite...

What do you guys mean with a floating ground? I haven't really understood that concept.

Basically I installed the regulator/rectifier in the same location of the stock regulator. Then I disregarded the blue wire. I only want my battery to pull load for the gps. So I connected the two yellow wires to the original yellow and brown wires. Then I took the red wire and connected it to the battery, and spliced in my positive lead for the gps in line with the battery. With the black wire off of the rectifier I grounded it to the frame, grounded the black wire from battery to the frame, and the ground wire to the gps to the frame.

I started the bike up and it gives a nice constant voltage, so it seems to be running right. However my headlight is really dim. I was thinking that since the battery was low on charge that it was using up most of my power to charge it. I didnt even touch the wiring to the headlight or tailight, cause I wanted it to stay in AC. What do you guys think? Do you think once the battery gets charged up my headlight will brighten up? If I look real close to the light it brightens slightly when the throttle is used.

So let me know if this set up sounds good, or what the floating ground set up is.

No, this is because the circuit you have the headlight wired to is an AC circuit, not a DC circuit. The battery, being a DC voltage power supply, is a DC supply, and as such not in the AC circuit. The way you wired this bike is consistant in one way with a dual output stator. A dual output stator has the ability to power a headlight with AC and the rest of the system thru a Rectifire/regulator with DC for the tailights, blinkers, and so on. If you want the headlight to be bright with the revs below about 1/4 throttle, run it to the DC output of the rec/reg. This will give you a bright headlight at idle until you kill the battery. Id charge the battery with a charger prior to doing this.

Thanks a lot. I will re-wire it tomorrow. I will run the whole system in DC for now, but then will look into getting a dual lighting stator so I can run both setups.

The whole reason I am doing this is so I don't have to use batteries for the GPS anymore. I like the idea of AC for the lighting, its so much simpler.

Thanks for the input, helps a lot.

Floating the ground on a DC system means that all ground wires are attached to a continuous circuit (wire) that leads only to the negative terminal of the battery. No ground leads within the system are attached to the frame.

I rebuilt the electrical system on my XR650R initially to provide regulated, steady state, filtered (battery) DC power for an Acewell 3700 computer. Since I rewound the stator with only a single output, I decided to run all electrical accessories on switched DC power (55/60W headlight, LED tail/brake light, horn, and computer). Dan Regalia from Baja Designs recommended not trying to use the AC power before the regulator (to power the headlight, etc.) as this would all but cancel out the DC power from the regulator. I went with his recommendation.

Guess it all depends on how you want to set up the electrical system on your bike for your specific needs. With this setup, the headlight provides full brightness from idle on up and will stay on without the motor running if needed.

More information on AC to DC conversion can be obtained from the Trail Tech website (From AC to DC - Key Concepts).

Once again, this is only how I chose to set up my system ... I'm not saying that it's the best, but it works for me.

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