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Spots to avoid while pressure washing

7 posts in this topic

Are there a list of spots I need to avoid when pressure washing my '06 YZ450? I have an exhaust plug. I also realize I need to cover/plug the airbox holes on each side of the seat. But other than that, are there any parts that I must avoid? Possibly the carborator or anything that may leak if I was it?

FYI: I probably will adjust the spray nozzle so it's not targetted, but more of a mist, with the hopes of not hitting a single spot with full pressure.

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Just pull the air filter out and cover it with an air box cover and pressure wash the vent holes and not worry about it.

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Are there a list of spots I need to avoid when pressure washing my '06 YZ450? I have an exhaust plug. I also realize I need to cover/plug the airbox holes on each side of the seat. But other than that, are there any parts that I must avoid? Possibly the carborator or anything that may leak if I was it?

FYI: I probably will adjust the spray nozzle so it's not targetted, but more of a mist, with the hopes of not hitting a single spot with full pressure.

Yes avoid direct pressure on your fork seals - it is easy to blow dirt deep into the seals and cause leakage. And completely avoid the steering head top and bottom bearings - water is sucked into these somehow..... :ride:

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Avoid all bushings,bearings and seals. Use the power washer only for blasting off heavy mud under fenders and spokes and such. Also, stay away from o- ring chains.

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Visualize the interface between any seal and its shaft, and any gasketed joint and avoid spraying at close range on a parallel to that. Back off when spraying around the carb, and spray the chain only from the sides, most especially if you are using an O-ring chain. Try to picture how water would enter a joint, and avoid being closer than 30 degrees to that joint (45 is better) whenever possible.

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using a good bike cleaner such as muc-off or pro-clean will help things alot, you spray it on leave for a couple of minutes and rinse off. It breaks the dirt down so you don't need much pressure to get the grime off! :ride:

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I don't recomend using a pressure washer at all... water at 3000 psi is just too hard to control. just use your hose and a sponge or rag :ride:

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