which chain for a 450f?

for strictly track riding, would you go with o-ring or non o-ring. i've just heard that o-ring chains drag more and cause nosediving on jumps. personally, i'm coming off an o-ring chain and my previous bike (03 crf450r) nosedived alot, but i just thought it was because it was a four stroke.

i just thought it was because it was a four stroke.
You were right. There is no real, significant power loss from an O-ring chain.

I use Regina ORN's. Their ZRH is also an excellent chain with the "Z" section rings (similar in concept to "X"-rings). My current chain is some two years old, and is still in great condition; adjusted 3 times, maybe.

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?p=3339535#post3339535

Careful: the thread is in a Honda forum.

use an X-ring chain. it supposed to have less friction because of it's design. less surface area of the seals against the chain links. what little friction an O-ring or X-ring chain may have,... we'll never notice it.

as far as noisediving(end-do) it may have been caused by your rear suspension not being properly set up, or riding style. (not trying to put you down) just something to think about.

I second Regina ORN. They last quite a long time. :crazy:

i'm, 5'7", 160 lbs.

my rear is set at 105.

my riding style may well be the culprit though. i do have problems balancing in the air. i think i tend to over/under compenesate. my biggest problem is pulling back on my bars without slipping way back.

Rolling off too soon at the jump lip on a four stroke will drop the nose and flip the tail up due to engine braking. It's no different than tapping the rear brake before leaving the ground. Avoiding it is just a matter of timing.

If you leave the crest with a lot of revs up and then drop the throttle, you'll cause the same thing. Jump in a higher gear.

Rolling off too soon at the jump lip on a four stroke will drop the nose and flip the tail up due to engine braking
My bro does this all the time. He has a hard time keeping the thottle steady off the face of the jump. It scares the hell out of him, but he keeps doing it. :crazy::ride:

guys, thanks for the tips. i'll try them when i pick up my bike. really, my problem is visualization. when i roll up on even rollers with steep faces, i psych myself out and let off the throttle. at the track i ride, there are three jumps i won't do yet; three is a big rollers that i cannot even get a glimpse what is on the other side (even though i do) and a double which lands on a real forgiving roller pad. do i just go for it or what? i've been pussyfooting for three times out to the track now?

Get the feel of the bike leaving the top with the gas on by slowing the run up to the face, then accelerating up the face moderately. Not to much, or your nose dive will turn into a tail stand. Overall, the YZ450 is a far easier bike to jump then my CR500 was. That thing... :crazy:

Get the feel of the bike leaving the top with the gas on by slowing the run up to the face, then accelerating up the face moderately. Not to much, or your nose dive will turn into a tail stand. Overall, the YZ450 is a far easier bike to jump then my CR500 was. That thing... :crazy:

thanks. i'm on the outside fringe (i think?). i'm a 32 year old guy that depends on his body functionaling properly day-day to keep me afloat. sometimes i think i;m over my head. others, i think i just need a couple tips. i can hit some jumps, but the bigger ones are when i'm pushed be better riders. at this point, i can see that my proble is psychological. i do need to overcome that and will, but would like any feedback. thanks guys in advance for your thoughts!

I too get the psychological fear, I think it's a reality check, sometimes I think it would be better to go and bomb my self out then go 'n' hit the track, no brain cells to tell me to slow down then hey.......

just start on smaller stuff and move up gradually. Once you decide to go for a jump that's within reason don't think about it at all on your approach. Let your instincs take over. Make sure you commit to it and keep your eyes focused on the top of the face and just hit. make sure you dont let off the throttle on the face. i like to give the bike a little compression and blip the throttle smoothly up the face, after i have good speed coming up to it. I find it easier to hit jumps in a higher gear so the throttle doesnt give too much power on the face.

im no pro, but this seems to work for me. I also hit ramps this way. gl

thanks. i'm on the outside fringe (i think?). i'm a 32 year old guy that depends on his body functionaling properly day-day to keep me afloat.
If only I was 32. I'll settle for 40. When I was 42, I was in better physical condition that I ever have been at any other time in my life. But common sense is a virtue. Old guys are more likely to get older because they have a clearer picture of what the real risks and limitations are. Don't ignore that.

Push your comfort zone a little at a time while staying within your capabilities. Working with tabletops, or even better, jumps you find out and around your play riding areas is the best way to get the feel of the bike in the air. What works real well is to find a trail that leads up and over a hill that you can ride up one side and down the other at speed with no problem, and that if you hit it at a moderate speed, you float off the crest and land 2/3 across the top or so. Hit it faster by stages until you're clearing the top altogether and landing on the downhill. The farther you go, the more you land on the slope and take the impact out of it, and you can get used to being airborne without being more than a couple feet off the ground.

Find little naturally step-ups and doubles with 3-4 foot gaps and just play on them. Take the pressure off and enjoy it, and you'll get better.

Most importantly, try to relax when jumping. Being stiff, nervous or unsure are the worst ways to hit a jump. If you have a good idea of how fast you need to go off a particular jump (watch other riders), then just stay centered on the bike and throttle all the way up the face.. you'll be fine.

I'm a newbie at this dirt biking and love doing it. When I'm trying jumping and mind you I am taking it slow as I'm 46, my feet come off the pegs. I try to be steady and smooth on the throttle and not too much gas coming in to the larger jumps as not to be catapulted in to next week. Or become like a bad check and bounce.

I'll keep at it but any insight on the feet leaving the pegs thing?

Thanks!

:banana: DID-ERT non O-ring :ride:
I'm a newbie at this dirt biking and love doing it. When I'm trying jumping and mind you I am taking it slow as I'm 46, my feet come off the pegs. I try to be steady and smooth on the throttle and not too much gas coming in to the larger jumps as not to be catapulted in to next week. Or become like a bad check and bounce.

I'll keep at it but any insight on the feet leaving the pegs thing?

Thanks!

Probably keeping your legs too stiff.

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