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YUKI

loose chain

18 posts in this topic

Evening guys,

New XRL. Chain is very loose after only 250 miles. What is the procedure to adust it?

ThanX, Yuki

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*Loosen the rear axle nut,there will be cam type adjustment plates on both sides which are graduated by numbers.

*To tighten chain, twist the right side adjuster anti clockwise, and the left side adjuster clockwise the exact same amount of graduations.

*Allow for about... (I allow about an inch to an inch and a half or so of chain flop or loose play underneath)

*Make sure back wheel is pushed firmly forward (dont slam it) against adjusting cam positioning lugs.

*Retighten axle nut.

*If you have gone to the furthest adjustment on these graduated plates already, or very near to this, you may need to get a couple of links removed from the chain.

*If this makes no sense when you look at it, then I may be mistaken of what bike you have OR you need to take it to someone who knows what they are doing.

Hope this helps. Eddy.

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Morning Eddie,

After I loosen the nuts, do I need to push the wheel backwards, or, that will take place anyways with the chain getting tighter?

ThanX, Yuki.

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Morning Eddie,

After I loosen the nuts, do I need to push the wheel backwards, or, that will take place anyways with the chain getting tighter?

ThanX, Yuki.

that will happen automatically when you twist those adjusting plates in the directions stated.

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I would highly recommend you buy a good Honda manual for your bike ... the aftermarket manuals are OK, but frequently leave a bit out, or are outright wrong on occasion ... there are procedures to correctly aligning a chain, as well as proper slack, that makes a world of difference to the life of your chain, ... go by the book ... :crazy:

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I would highly recommend you buy a good Honda manual for your bike ... the aftermarket manuals are OK, but frequently leave a bit out, or are outright wrong on occasion ... there are procedures to correctly aligning a chain, as well as proper slack, that makes a world of difference to the life of your chain, ... go by the book ... :crazy:

that would be the answer to 99.9% of questions on this forum, and if everyone gave that answer, it would defeat the purpose of the forum.

I dont think chain tension needs to be such an exact science for someone who tends to use his ride mostly as a commuter. If I am incorrect in my post, please correct me, dont just sit there and say "buy the damn book" :ride:

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Here's another tip when retightening the axle nut & bolt. Typically the axle nut is on the right side & when you snug it up & then torque it down, usually the eccentric cam adjuster spins away from the pin stop messing up your adjustment. This can become very annoying trying to remedy this. :ride:

Do the final torque on the left, or bolt-head side. Works everytime, for me that is... :crazy:

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Here's another tip when retightening the axle nut & bolt. Typically the axle nut is on the right side & when you snug it up & then torque it down, usually the eccentric cam adjuster spins away from the pin stop messing up your adjustment. This can become very annoying trying to remedy this. :ride:

Do the final torque on the left, or bolt-head side. Works everytime, for me that is... :crazy:

My manual said torque the nut side, not the bolt to 68 ft/#'s

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I suggest the manual, because chain tension is more important than some beginners may think ... too loose, it comes off the sprocket, maybe busting the cases ... too tight, it can seriously damage the transmission internals, or break the chain, busting the cases ... the manual will help a beginner fix or adjust his bike the safe way, the correct way ... yes, I could tell him how to adjust the chain, but then, he would be getting "MY' opinion, rather than the designated correct way, and I would not want to possibly contribute to someones expensive damage ... :crazy:

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My manual said torque the nut side, not the bolt to 68 ft/#'s

Good luck with your "manual" & torque wrench when you're reinstalling the rear wheel on your or your buddy's bike after fixing a flat out on the trail. :crazy:

Turning wrenches on an axle doesn't need to be that precise, that is if you know how to turn a wrench...

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It's normal for a new chain to require an adjustment after the first few rides. Don't make it too tight! After making the adjustment , sit on the bike and check the slack. It may take 2 people to compress the suspension enough. It needs to still have a little slack when compressed.

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Good luck with your "manual" & torque wrench when you're reinstalling the rear wheel on your or your buddy's bike after fixing a flat out on the trail. :ride:

Turning wrenches on an axle doesn't need to be that precise, that is if you know how to turn a wrench...

all im sayin is that my manual said nut, not axle!

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all im sayin is that my manual said nut, not axle!

You just don't get it, that's easy to see. Well since you keep bringin' this up, I'll give you some more to chew on:

Cinch the nut up snug, tighten the axle bolt (not nut), then torque it down (not bolt) to spec, making sure all the while you have your manual & torque wrench with you at all times... :banana:

There now, that wasn't too hard to figure out now was it...well then again... :ride:

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My clymer manual says to get the rear tire off the ground then adjust for 1 1/2 inches or so of play. This seems crazy because when I sit on the bike, it is tight as hell!

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I'd swear that my manual says to check the chain while it's on the side stand not while sitting on the seat?

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I sit on the bike and get the little woman to push down on the seat and I adj the chain with a little play while loaded down then I check how much play there is while on the sidestand unloaded, that's the setting I allways use from then on so it's not binding when loaded over bumps or jumps. Chains tipically get tighter when the suspension is compressed and will put a load on the countershaft (bearing, shaft, seal and chain) that's not good. :ride:

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I'd swear that my manual says to check the chain while it's on the side stand not while sitting on the seat?

You'd be right, also. It's how I check mine. The little Owner's Manual is full of useful information, if you take the time to read it.

Sitting on the seat, or weighting the rear end a bit, is just another "check" to see & feel if the chain is too tight or not...

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