Engine Life

I don't think going to an alternate bike is going to change anything. If you are harder on your machine than most I would say shorter maintenance intervals are required. Like 642MX said, it might be a good idea to check the chain and gears.

I have never changed the timing chain in my 98 WR400. That's 8 years of consistant desert and mountain riding including up and back Baja. I runs in an oil bath and properly tensioned at all times. Don't see why it can't last the life of the engine.

I agree Ncampion :thumbsup:

I see people often saying 'I ride my bike at x amount rpm' etc....how in the fook do you know what rpm you are doing? Was there a tacho issued that I dont know about? :thumbsup:

On my second WR, always kept valves adjusted, oil changed every third ride, clean air filter, etc... and have never had to tear a motor down. I ride atleast 3-4 times a month averaging 70 mile rides, race the NMA off road series that has some huge flat out GP courses that will will task every last pony the motor has and found the WR motor to be the toughest most reliable motor in it's class...... The timig chain thing has me curious, I'm gonna check that lower gear as suggested.

You should'nt have to worry about engine life, maintain it well, if something happens well, something happens but it shouldn't be due to a lack of proper maintenance :thumbsup:

I'm no WR expert, but this whole changing the timing chain once a year doesn't seem to pass the TT litmus test. I have been reading the TT WR forum for some time now and there has been very few postings about the timing chain jumping a cog and blowing the engine. Nor has anyone mentioned this as regular maintenance of the bike. Now everyone seems to think that their is some issue with the timing chain.

So let's all go out and buy new timing chains. It only makes sense as it really pays to do preventative maintenance on a virtually unlikely problem.

I'm no WR expert, but this whole changing the timing chain once a year doesn't seem to pass the TT litmus test. I have been reading the TT WR forum for some time now and there has been very few postings about the timing chain jumping a cog and blowing the engine. Nor has anyone mentioned this as regular maintenance of the bike. Now everyone seems to think that their is some issue with the timing chain.

So let's all go out and buy new timing chains. It only makes sense as it really pays to do preventative maintenance on a virtually unlikely problem.

Maybe some of you think a WR/YZ is a just like an XR (add gas and go), but its not that simple. If you never want to change your timing chain...then don't. I could careless, but don't shoot the messenger. I work on bikes/ATV's for a living. I see whats failing, and I'm simply trying to advise you hard heads before you tear your crank up. :thumbsup:

just to let you know I tried 13/50 and found it to low to much wheel spin so Im going to give 14/52 a try and I still haven't had any problem with the bike

just to let you know I tried 13/50 and found it to low to much wheel spin so Im going to give 14/52 a try and I still haven't had any problem with the bike

13/50 is a great tight and technical set up but I have found the stock 14/50 to work well in most conditions except desert, (need more speed :thumbsup: )

Timing chains are used on most all over head cam motors, not just motorcycles, except when the cam is gear driven.

The chain is subjected to forces that cause it to stretch over time. With a tensioner, the stretch is kept in check, although the cam crank timing is going to change somewhat. This is nothing new to internal combustion engines with overhead cams and timing chains and or belts. Even on your Chevy p/u, you should change your timing chain.

You know you can ride with a stretched out chain for years with no problems, but then again, you can have serious problems from that timing chain. Its a weak link in the durability of any motor.

I would suggest replacing the chain every 3000 miles(or sooner) for those who want a well maintained bike:)

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