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Beejay

Boiling or not - damage?

12 posts in this topic

After riding in some really hot weather on a fairly technical, slow speed ride out in the bush last weekend I noticed when i stopped on a few occasions that I could hear what sounded like the radiator boiling when I switched off.

I experienced no problems after but is this normal for slow paced technical riding or am I doing damage.

Anyone else experienced this? :thumbsup:

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I was worried about that happening to my bike but has not yet.Thinking about the boysen water pump cover and impeller runs about 150$ but well worth the money if it keeps the heat down.Then you would have less of a power loss motor would last longer with less heat in it.Thats my 2 cents.Anybody running the water pump cover and impeller notice a difference in the running temp. of your bike.

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just a few things to keep track of :

- regularly change your oil (and filter) - 300klm ?

- always check your coolant level before a ride and allow a 10 ~ 15mm airgap for expansion

- check your plug for correct jetting ... an engine running lean will cause it to run a little hotter than one on the slightly rich side

- mine also can run a little hot on single track sections in Australia (especially in the Summer 36* C+) so i give it a little rest now and then or head for the open tracks to cool it down a little

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Yep, normal. Thats why they have a coolant reservoir under the rear fender!

I ride a fair bit of sand, that makes it real hot. You could try a better coolant, boyesen water pump cover / impeller kit, bigger radiators too if you have the money.

I would suggest you change your oil frequently if that is the type of riding you do.

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After riding in some really hot weather on a fairly technical, slow speed ride out in the bush last weekend I noticed when i stopped on a few occasions that I could hear what sounded like the radiator boiling when I switched off.

I experienced no problems after but is this normal for slow paced technical riding or am I doing damage.

Anyone else experienced this? :thumbsup:

I noticed this on my bike to and had a closer look. The sound came from the coolant bubbling over into the expansion tank under the rear fender. I think it's normal :thumbsup:

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Use some "Water Wetter" or some " Engine Ice " coolant aditive and your coolant problems will be much reduced. WR Dave :thumbsup:

Engine Ice Engine Ice. :thumbsup: It really made a difference - that and running it richer.

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I'll probably get slammed for this because I'm a big proponent of straight distilled water with water wetter and just enough anti freeze to provide freeze protection, BUT, if you're having problems keeping coolant in your rads, Evans NPGr is the trick. Your bike will run hotter, but it won't boil out. Between the flush and the coolant, it's probably less than half the cost of the Boyesen impeller and cover.

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I would suggest you change your oil frequently if that is the type of riding you do.

Yep, I'm fanatical about oil changes, never used to be but when I saw what my oil looks like after a couple rides I now view it differently.

Maybe I am running a bit lean as on decompression the exhaust is bogging(right word?) backfiring.

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the boyesen water pump only shows improvement at low rpm's. in situations where mud and sand keep the rpm's up and speeds down the faster flow rates are counter productive,also these higher flow rates at high rpm cause alot of turbulence. i've tried all of the combinations listed and found that the stock water pump,fluidyne rads,and evans NPG-R are the best combo when it comes to spinning in mud/sand at low speed or even when your about stuck. i have yet to boil over with this setup, before that it was almost a sure thing :thumbsup:

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