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TIGER44

Tire Installation?

9 posts in this topic

Finally got the old one off! Heck I guess that was the easy part. I have quit trying for the night getting the new one back on. Whats the trick?

I can't even get the thing started. Where do I start?

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Depends on where you live but if its not cold as heck I usually leave my tires out in the sun so the rubber is softer and more plyable(sp?) I use water mixed with dish soap to lube both beads. Lube is key. You can take the rim lock off to put first bead on its easier.I use 3 tire irons and put the first bead on. Put rimlock back on .Insert tube, now its kinda hard, make sure you dont twist the tube. Start by the rimlock and use tire irons to fold 2nd bead over. Its hella easier with a machine but I busted tires for 3 years and unfortunately when we are stuck in the middle of nowhere, i am nominated to do them.

Dont pinch the tube and make sure your rimstrip is good

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Gotta make sure you warm up the new tire in the sun, douse it with a good squirt of lube, and start putting it on. Assuming you have a good set of tire irons, getting the first half of the tire on isn't a real big deal as long as you keep the opposite side you are working on in the center of the rim (so it's not stretching it any more than it has to). After that, use some sort of baby powder on the tube, install it (after you've positioned the rim lock, of course) and work to get the valve stem installed (cuss words help here). Put some good amount of air in the tube to ensure it's nice and positioned correctly, let all the pressure (not air) out and cap it -- the tube should have some air in it so it rolls away from your irons rather than get pinched. Now work on the last bead of the tire. I like to start opposite the rim lock so I can keep the tire stretched the least. A good shot of lube and some incredible patience pays off in the end (or just cuss a lot and bash your knuckles like I do). I'm SO glad I only change one or two back tires a year....the fronts are a piece of cake!!!

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I just tried some spray lube not soapy water. The temp was about 50 but the tire needs to be a lot hotter. I might take a hair dryer to it. When I took the other tire off I took off each side slid the rim down in the tire and pryed the tire off. Does installing need to be performed the same way. I can't get the rim down inside the tire. Can't really get the tire irons to "grab" anything for leverage. I think if I can get started I can do it. You mean I am going to cuss putting the tire back on too!!!

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You mean I am going to cuss putting the tire back on too!!!

You haven't begun to cuss..... :bonk:

Seriously, though, it's not all that bad. Warming the tire is a huge help, and if you lay the rim on the ground (on a piece of cardboard or something, sprocket side down) then to put your first bead on have the tire at an angle to the rim so that only one part of the bead is contacting the rim. This allows you to start with the bead already inside the rim, and if the tire is lubed up, using your irons you can slowly work the rest of the bead down and over the rim (like a trap door closing). The real work is in the second bead....

:bonk::thumbsup::bonk::thumbsup: (that's me changing a rear tire!)

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The best support for changing tires has to be an old 14" rim. I took sections of garden hose and split it, then zip tied it to the rim through holes I drilled. The spokes lie against the garden hose and then you can then work on the rim without the sprocket, rotor, or hubs touching against the ground. I even adapted it to mount to my workbench with a threaded rod and a couple 4"x4" pieces of plywood to hold the whole thing steady. I'll try to get some pics up if anyone's interested.

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When I took the other tire off I took off each side slid the rim down in the tire and pryed the tire off. Does installing need to be performed the same way?

Yes, that's the method I use. Lots of soapy water on tire and rim. Tube inside the tire, with valve stem at the bottom. Standing up, tire in between legs, push down on the top of the tire to get the bottom to spread out, insert rim (lining up valve stem) at bottom and push in as far as possible. Still supporting the tire and rim between your legs, use tire iron to get the rest of the rim stuffed all the way inside the tire. Careful not to pinch the tube when stuffing the rim in. Put the tire down and use your tire irons to get the bead on both sides inside the rim.

The first couple times is a bitch, but once I got the process down, it now takes 10 minutes to take a tire off and put a new one on.

Jerry

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