Carbon fiber vs. aluminum skid/glide plates 06 450

Other than it sounds cool, what are the advantages/disadvantages to an aluminum vs a carbon fiber skid/glide plate. I would assume that carbon fiber was a little ligher but more than twice as expensive. The works connection glide plate that I saw on a web site looked like it was a one piece that that had some swiss cheese holes toward the top (tongue of the glide plate). Who is making carbon fiber and does it stand up to the abuse as well as aluminum? I have used aluminum from works connection on a 99 YZ 125 smoker but it too didnt fit easily and was somewhat difficult to put on. Who knows what production dates and pricesare going to be offered?

Carbon fiber definitely will not stand up to the abuse. One good hit and it's history. Aluminum can be pounded back out over an over. Only material I will run on a skidder is alum.

not somthing you want to take chances with-use aluminum

CF looks cool until it gets wear on it...then it looks like crap...one good hit and it is smashed!

The works connection is nice and easy to install....and covers the lower frame rails where most of the impact occurs.... :thumbsup:

Ahhhhh bullcrap! I've had a carbonfiber on my WR450 for 6 months, and its holding up as well as the aumin-i on my 250!

Ahhhhh bullcrap! I've had a carbonfiber on my WR450 for 6 months, and its holding up as well as the aumin-i on my 250!

Well, take a good impact on a tree or a rock and you'll test that idea first hand...

Look, the factory guys run bling CF because guess what? They can replace it whenever they need to. If you want to buy a few plates in CF for the "just in case" scenerio and play factory rider, go for it. However, if you want/need something dependable and that will stand up to abuse, aluminum will always win. Why are radiator braces made of metal and not CF? :thumbsup:

Well, take a good impact on a tree or a rock and you'll test that idea first hand...

Look, the factory guys run bling CF because guess what? They can replace it whenever they need to. If you want to buy a few plates in CF for the "just in case" scenerio and play factory rider, go for it. However, if you want/need something dependable and that will stand up to abuse, aluminum will always win. Why are radiator braces made of metal and not CF? :thumbsup:

Still bull crap! The carbon fiber on my Wr450 has hit everything from downed logs to rail road track ties and rocks. No cracks or any other deteriation, plus, it was less expensive then my Utah skid on the YZ250F. I would guess that if I took a hammer to it, it would not hold up like the aluminum skid, however, that would not be a practical thing to do, would it?

I am done with this. I can not add any more to this topic. At the end of the day, if you do any trail riding or woods riding it is a VERY good idea to have a skid plate to protect those critical parts, especially on a 4-stroke. :thumbsup:

Still bull crap! The carbon fiber on my Wr450 has hit everything from downed logs to rail road track ties and rocks. No cracks or any other deteriation, plus, it was less expensive then my Utah skid on the YZ250F. I would guess that if I took a hammer to it, it would not hold up like the aluminum skid, however, that would not be a practical thing to do, would it?

I am done with this. I can not add any more to this topic. At the end of the day, if you do any trail riding or woods riding it is a VERY good idea to have a skid plate to protect those critical parts, especially on a 4-stroke. :thumbsup:

Didn't argue that it is a good idea for ANY bike to have - especially, if you woods ride. However, if you think CF is as good as Aluminum, you're kinda off base a tad. Why do you think CF exhaust cannister will crack before an aluminum or Ti would? Sure, heat factors in, but your skid plate gets hot, too AND it takes hits more so than an exhaust can would.

Look, CF skid plates are cool, but if you are concerned with breakage, buy an aluminum one as it will last the test of time...

Blaster is right.

CF is strong enough for a skidplate application. (relative to thickness)

F1 car tubs are CF.

You can take certain CF mtn bike handlebars and literally beat them against a sharp rock with no effect at all.

Teflon would be the SH!T though.

Before you attempt to describe carbon fiber, do this; tell me what plastic is like.

Your first response should be to say something like, "what kind of plastic?", and that's exactly my point.

Carbon fiber's strength, durability, and suitability for an application depends entirely on how, and how well, it's made. So, it gets back to the same old thing: Some stuff is better than others.

The springs on Corvettes are CF (which means the rear spring weighs 5 pounds instead of 75). Some of the people who buy them have more money than they have either driving skills or brains, so every once in a while we'd see one come in that had been backed into a bridge abutment at 90 or so, and one corner of the rear of the car would be more or less missing. In a lot of cases, the end of the spring would be sticking out in the air, the only thing that wasn't broken. Made right, it's awfully strong.

The DSP engine guards on my 250 have passed the rock test (the rock lost, BTW, even though it did knock Junior on his butt) and they still look OK.

Carbon fiber definitely will not stand up to the abuse. One good hit and it's history. Aluminum can be pounded back out over an over. Only material I will run on a skidder is alum.

I disagree. I've ran a WC glide plate aswell as a lightspeed and the lightspeed is just as strong. Sunday I took the worst casing of a jump in my life. Landed straight on the skidplate and not a mark on it.

I read all of the posts on this topic here. It seems that some people believe aluminum is the way to go while others think that Carbonfiber is just as good. My original question is still unanswered and that is what actually justifies the increased cost of a carbon fiber skid/glide plate over an aluminum one. Also, I think its eline (carbon fiber maker) that boasts that they impregnate their carbon fiber with kevlar and that is what makes it so tough and durable. Is there a weight difference and if so, how much are we talking here?

I guess I am wrong. Sorry. I was refering to the cheapo CF skid plates I usually see. I definately know that CF can be used if processed right, in lieu of aluminum. Hell, my Trek OCLV Mtn. bike is proof of that.

However, unless it is a very reputable source, I'd be cautious. Litespeed seems to have the best, but I am sure there are others with referals.

Buy what you deam fit for your application.

I just may try the Litespeed CF plate...

If you had two glide plates (or whatever) of equal strength, one CF and the other aluminum, the CF plate will weigh about half what the alloy one does. Beyond that, the alloy plate will bend out of shape when forced past a certain point under pressure, and suffer permanent (although often repairable) dents and distortion. CF will rebound to its original shape when deformed, up to the limit of its strength, and even as it begins to break, it will do so like a "wet stick", retaining a portion of its original strength in spite of a partial failure. Aluminum is harder, but not that much in many cases.

The big advantage is in weight reduction. You decide if that makes it worth the cost for you.

I read all of the posts on this topic here. It seems that some people believe aluminum is the way to go while others think that Carbonfiber is just as good. My original question is still unanswered and that is what actually justifies the increased cost of a carbon fiber skid/glide plate over an aluminum one. Also, I think its eline (carbon fiber maker) that boasts that they impregnate their carbon fiber with kevlar and that is what makes it so tough and durable. Is there a weight difference and if so, how much are we talking here?

Read on Lightspeed that they are 50% weight of the stock one. And stock is even smaller.

I've thrashed every piece of Carbon Fiber I've ever put on my bike and they don't last long either. I've since replace every piece of CF with aluminum and haven't had to replace a single piece yet. Had to take them off and bend them back into place a couple times.

I guess if I rode the easy stuff all the time CF would be just fine but it doesn't last for me worth a darn. Or mabye I could learn to ride better!

Lightspeed(DSP) is the best. I wouldn't buy another carbon fiber works item... Quality doesn't seem to be as good as lightspeeds.

so who all has skid plates plates out right now for the 06'

i know works connection but who else?

What's lightspeeds' URL? I come from a mountain bike background and we were all weight weenies (gram counters). CF could be lighter than aluminum but I'm concerned that they beef it up so much that the weight advantage is almost none by the time they are done. Any actual weight numbers on any of the skid/glide plates?

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