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buffaman

touque wrench

8 posts in this topic

i see in the yamaha manuel almost everything has a torque spec...i've looked at several places to buy one but all has been just ok..anyone konw where to but a quality torque wrench ???

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Sears has good ones. I have a big one and a small one. smaller one is in inch pounds. I keep a calculator handy. Haven't snapped anything yet!!! This is very rare for me. My friends call me Torque arm!! I am constantly snaping bolts off on my snowmobile!! My wife had no problem releasing the funds for two good torque wrenchs after all the money I've spent on replacing parts :)

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I just bought a Craftsman Digitork last week. I was doing an oil change and removed the oil line to get the strainer out of the frame. When I was putting it back on the 6mm bolt snapped in half! I was using a cheap beam-type torque wrench. The threads on the bolt were streched so I think it was overtightened at the factory and this was the first time I've ever removed it. Needless to say I wasn't happy. Bought the new one the next day. It's 3/8" drive and goes from 5 to 80 ft-lbs. Very nice! $90 at Sears (a little pricey but worth it for my blue baby!)

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PapaSmurf, I'm not familiar with the Digitork wrench, but you might want to check in the instruction manual. I believe that most torque wrenches are rated for accuracy between 20% to 100% of their torque capacity. In other words, a 5-80 ft/lb wrench is rated for accuracy at settings at or over 16 ft/lbs. Accuracy closer to the bottom of the scale (i.e., at 5 ft/lbs) is not so good. A have added a good "inch pound" wrench to my tool box for those 6mm bolts. I think they torque to somewhere around 7 ft/lb. Also, take a close look at all the 6mm bolts involved in your oil & filter change and check for any signs of stress (such as stretching).

This is how I know:

I over torqued the same bolt on my then brand new WR250F (with a 5-80 ft/lb torque wrench), but it did not snap. Well, it did not snap that is until I was out on the trail. My brother just happened to glance back at my bike when we paused on the trail and pointed to the oil gushing out. I immediately killed it. By the oil trail I found later, it had only snapped off moments before. Needless to say I was freaked out. When I got the bike back in my garage I replaced the bolt and drained the remaining oil so I could refill. I got about 4-6 ounces of oil out (OH MY GOD!). Put new oil in and it still runs great today (phew!). I don't want to even think about what would have happened if I had run the bike for even a few more minutes out there on the trail. If my brother had not looked back exactly when he did...(shudder)

Yeah, they are kind of pricey, but once I learned about the limitations of the larger torque wrench, I didn't even bat an eyelash at spending another 80 bucks on another smaller one.

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Originally posted by neWRiver:

PapaSmurf, I'm not familiar with the Digitork wrench, but you might want to check in the instruction manual. I believe that most torque wrenches are rated for accuracy between 20% to 100% of their torque capacity. In other words, a 5-80 ft/lb wrench is rated for accuracy at settings at or over 16 ft/lbs. Accuracy closer to the bottom of the scale (i.e., at 5 ft/lbs) is not so good. A have added a good "inch pound" wrench to my tool box for those 6mm bolts. I think they torque to somewhere around 7 ft/lb. Also, take a close look at all the 6mm bolts involved in your oil & filter change and check for any signs of stress (such as stretching).

This is how I know:

I over torqued the same bolt on my then brand new WR250F (with a 5-80 ft/lb torque wrench), but it did not snap. Well, it did not snap that is until I was out on the trail. My brother just happened to glance back at my bike when we paused on the trail and pointed to the oil gushing out. I immediately killed it. By the oil trail I found later, it had only snapped off moments before. Needless to say I was freaked out. When I got the bike back in my garage I replaced the bolt and drained the remaining oil so I could refill. I got about 4-6 ounces of oil out (OH MY GOD!). Put new oil in and it still runs great today (phew!). I don't want to even think about what would have happened if I had run the bike for even a few more minutes out there on the trail. If my brother had not looked back exactly when he did...(shudder)

Yeah, they are kind of pricey, but once I learned about the limitations of the larger torque wrench, I didn't even bat an eyelash at spending another 80 bucks on another smaller one.

====where did you buy the smaller torque wrench ???

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where did you buy your inch pound wrench. sears told me yesterday they don't sell them !!!...need one soon as i'm going to do the yz timing and i want to make sure to torque the cam tower correctly..any help would be great..model # or something

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Sears Item #00944593000

Mfr. Model #44593

$69.99

This is a must have item!

Go to http://www.sears.com

Then Tools, Mechanics Tools, Torque Wrenches. The url is too long to link...

[This message has been edited by Ron in SoCal (edited September 10, 2001).]

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HEY THANKS FOR THE INFO ON THE SEARS TORQUE WRENCH,FOUND IT ON SEARS WEB SITE, CHECKED THERE INVENTORY AND I WILL BE AT SEARS TOMORROW ON MY LUNCH HOUR..RIGHT AFTER I GO AND GET SOME MORE RACE FUEL. I RIDE EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT AT BEE-CANYON HERE IN GOOD OLE HEMET

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