I F%$#ed up!! Need help!

Is the oil drain plug on the engine reverse threaded? I was changing the oil in the bike today and thought it was too tight. I checked the direction of my socket wrench. Lefty loosey right?! So I pulled a little harder and it seemed to brake loose. I kept turning and turning and it did not come out. That’s when I knew I was screwed. I tried turning it the other direction and it came out along with all my aluminum threads from the crankcase. I am probably going to turn it over to the shop, but any suggestions would be helpful.

Thanks

Greg C.

Sorry to hear that happen, The threads are not reverse threads, It sounds like the plug was either cross threaded or it was just too tight. The solution would be to helicoil the hole where the threads should be. That shouldn't be very hard or expensive. The good part is that the helicoil will be much stronger than the aluminum case(steel vs. aluminum).Good Luck to you.

Dave, Greg is right when he said to install a Helicoil. I had to do the same thing to my subframe where the seat bolts go, I was paranoid to think that I'de ruined my bike, but have no fear they work dude!! They will put you back 40 bucks or so but they will never cross thred again. If you need further assistance with Helicoils just email me and I'll be able to talk you through as I use them quite often at work. Best of luck!!! Dan

What exactly are Helicoils?

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JJ - 99 WR; WR timed, stock jetting, Scotts stabalizer, Scotts triple clamps, Pro-Tapers, Terry Cable Hot start, MSR Raptor clutch lever, Moose skid plate, Works frame guards, Acerbis Pro Rally guards, Renthal MD-soft grips, Russel speed bleeders, Factory Effect graphics, YZ rear fender

A new thread. You drill out old thread, tap hole using "helicoil" tap then use a tool to screw in a new thread. You can buy it in a kit.

There is a better solution than Helicoils. Several companies make solid threaded inserts in stainless steel. They use a standard tap. I would attempt this repair on the motor in the frame, and flush it out thoroughly, before doing a complete teardown.

Oh, and lefty loosy righty tighty is reversed when working upside down.

Left loosey is always accurate when bolt is viewed directly. The upside down thing will always throw a person's perspective off. off. Don't go for that philosphy. If need be, stick your face in a position to see the bolt directly. This will cure the upside down thing. It is like describing left or right of your bike. Left from the saddle or in front looking at it? The answer is from the saddle of course.

Acetelin (or Oxygen) uses reverse threads. There are very, very few applications where reverse threads are used in this beautiful world of ours..

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'99 WZ with all YZ mods, FMF PowerBomb header, Stroker SX-1 silencer, SS front brake line, forked over by Pro-Action, OEM YZ tank and IMS seat.

That would be the acetylene with reverse thread connections, to differentiate from the oxygen (so the regulators/hoses cannot be connected to the wrong fittings/bottles).

I have always looked at bolts in the view of clockwise/counterclockwise - seems less confusing than the left/right method.

I think that I have realized my mistake. I pointed the socket towards me when I did the lefty loosey trick, therefor setting the tool to tighten. :) I am only going to make that mistake once! I did order a helicoil from the parts store it will be in tomorrow. Thanks for the help.

Originally posted by Greg C.:

I think that I have realized my mistake. I pointed the socket towards me when I did the lefty loosey trick, therefor setting the tool to tighten. :) I am only going to make that mistake once! I did order a helicoil from the parts store it will be in tomorrow. Thanks for the help.

Most threads turn via the "right hand rule." There is usually a reason why a thread would be a left hand thread. The most common example is the thread where the pedals on a bicycle attach to the crank. One is left hand, the other right, so that when you pedal, they both tighten (so you can't pedal them off).

This right hand rule works well. Take your RIGHT hand, (unless there is some reason to suspect a left hand thread, then use your left), and point the thumb in the direction you want the bolt to go. Your fingers will show the direction to turn.

Tightening: If you want the bolt to go in, place your thumb on the head of the bolt (so that your thumb is pointing into the bolt). Follow your fingers to tighten.

Loosening: If you want the bolt to come out, place your side of your palm on the head of the bolt (so that your thumb is pointing away from the bolt). Follow your fingers to loosen it.

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