no wheel lock

So ya, i bought my bike a bit ago yzf 450 and it never had a wheel lock. These things are torquey sob's so i can imagine its a must....but..... ive ran my nobbie and paddle without it without ANY problems. as a matter a fact. i changed to a nobbie, popped the tube and did wheelies witha flat tire :cry: (i know i know) :applause:

what do you guys say about these things, are they necessary?

:bonk:

kevan

I'd say rim locks are necessary.

I'd say rim locks are necessary.

I agree, and so does Yamaha. In fact, they think so much of them that they put two on the rear wheel of the WRs.

ummmmm ok

someone want to tell me exactly how the hell they work anyways..

i know there mandatory and keep the tire from shifting and breaking off the valve stem when you run low pressure and brake hard or something. but how does that stupid thing clamp the tire to the rim?

.

ummmmm ok

someone want to tell me exactly how the hell they work anyways..

i know there mandatory and keep the tire from shifting and breaking off the valve stem when you run low pressure and brake hard or something. but how does that stupid thing clamp the tire to the rim?

Bead locks (a more accurate name) are wedge shaped. As the stud that goes through their middle and into the hole in the rim is tightened they basically pinch the tire bead against the rim like a clamp. Some have ribbed faces where they contact the tire to prevent slippage even more.

Here is what a rim lock looks like. When you tighten the bolt it pulls it towards the rim but the tire is inbetween the rim and the rimlock so it squeezes it. Rubber grips very well so it prevents the rim from spinning around the tire, even from the power of a 450.

No thats cool.. I know what they look like,. i know what they do. i just was curious HOW it holds the tire... cool deal so when you tighten it it pinches the tire against the rim cool deal. I know my bike has them. 04 yz 450.. never had a problem running low air pressure

didnt know the WR has two per rim though. thats a little over kill..

for a WR.

didnt know the WR has two per rim though. thats a little over kill.. for a WR.
Actually, it's not. The WR uses an 18" rear wheel and its tires have a taller sidewall and more rotating mass. Also, the WR is more likely to be ridden with lower air pressure and in situations that could spin a tire on the rim. And contrary to an earlier statement, a rim lock is not made entirely of rubber. It is cast aluminum with a rubber covering to protect the tire and tube from chafing.

well alright professor

so ya, was stilll able to pull a wheelie. I think they should be there for sure, but my tire was dead flat and the rim did not spin on the tire. Im gonna not worry about it till later, i think they only cost around 15 bux. i think two of them is overkill cause from my exsperience, i did what i wanted without one. but wr's need to be reliable, so if a serious flat happens at high speed, we dont need the tire to come off as well as spin

kevan

I'd say rim locks are necessary.

I agree. They are a must on the rear. I just changed my front tire & tube. I was surprised to see one on my front rim - but I still think even having one on the front is good. Can't imagine having to change a tire that has 2 of them. Hell I struggle enough with just one when changing a tire or tube... Damn I hate changing tires...

So missing a rim lock on the front tire shouldn't be nearly as much of a concern as the rear. Unless doing a stoppie i suppose

So missing a rim lock on the front tire shouldn't be nearly as much of a concern as the rear. Unless doing a stoppie i suppose

Yes I would agree. I would imagine on some big jumps however, if your front tire was spinning enough when it hit the ground, the tire could possibly slip on the rim. The rim lock is a must on the rear.

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