How Do You Clean Your Filter

Stainless, I use Simple Green to clean my bike, boots, helmet, chest protector, air filters, and everything around the house. The stuff is great. I've been cleaning my filters with it for over a year with absolutely no problems.

I'm guessing you had some type of a chemical reaction from mixing the No Toil with a degreaser.

Well next time I go to the store I'll have to grab some simple green. I like to use degreser on my bike at the pressure washer. Is there anything I shouldn't use it on?

I use Uni Foam Filter Cleaner and Maxima oil (either the FAB1 spray or the FFT liquid). The cleaner rinses clean is just a minute or two and occasionally requires a second application.

Ditto dat

You guys that are washing your filters in the machine must be having a laugh....well I hope you are!! For those guys that are using petrol or diesel to wash out your filters be warned, whilst its an excellent cleaner and removes all before it..it will EAT away at the seems around your filter.

Use proper filter cleaner, wash in mild luke warm soapy water (check out all the shit in the sink that you thought had cleaned!!) before allowing to dry by oxidization.

You guys that are washing your filters in the machine must be having a laugh....well I hope you are!! For those guys that are using petrol or diesel to wash out your filters be warned, whilst its an excellent cleaner and removes all before it..it will EAT away at the seems around your filter.

Use proper filter cleaner, wash in mild luke warm soapy water (check out all the shit in the sink that you thought had cleaned!!) before allowing to dry by oxidization.

Dry by oxidation?? That's like rusting it dry, right?

Dry by oxidation?? That's like rusting it dry, right?

lol i think he means air dry :applause:

For those guys that are using petrol or diesel to wash out your filters be warned, whilst its an excellent cleaner and removes all before it..it will EAT away at the seems around your filter.

QUOTE]

I have 3 UNI filters that are 2 years old, and none of them have any damage from using gas to clean them.

I have three more things to say on this subject.

The first is that I find that how easy the filter is to get clean is of almost no importance to me compared with how well the oil I use stops and holds dirt. Any sized dirt. Fine dust, coarse sand, whatever. Once I have found an oil that does that, I will only replace it if it becomes unreasonably difficult to either wash the old stuff out or get the new stuff in.

Secondly, when installing the sticky, gooey, properly oiled filter, put it in an old plastic grocery bag, or something similar, until you get it past the subframe and rolled around into position, then pull off the bag and screw it down. You'll avoid smearing oil on everything and getting dirt on your fresh filter.

Thirdly, credit to Sir Thumpalot for the best drying idea I ever used: I take the rinsed filter element and set it over the intake end of a high output squirrel cage fan (mine came from an old range hood that was replaced by a microwave oven), turn it on and return 1-2 hours later to a dry filter. Since it's a dual fan, I can dry two filters at once, one on each end.

I know I said 3, but for those of you with pre-'03 bikes: This Makes it Easier

The first is that I find that how easy the filter is to get clean is of almost no importance to me compared with how well the oil I use stops and holds dirt. Any sized dirt. Fine dust, coarse sand, whatever. Once I have found an oil that does that, I will only replace it if it becomes unreasonably difficult to either wash the old stuff out or get the new stuff in.QUOTE]

Grayracer, good tips, thanks.:-)

Now, the problem I've had in past is this: my '99 YZ400 doesn't like freshly oiled filters. Won't start well after fresh filter is installed, restricts flow too much. (I used UNI foam filter oil, saturated the filter, squeezed out excess, then installed.)

What oil should I be using, and should I not totally saturate the filter? (Maybe the UNI oil is just TOO thick . . .)

I thought that UNI oil was thin? I like the Motorex spray oil, I don't work it in at all, I just spray the outside until its covered and then install.

Now, the problem I've had in past is this: my '99 YZ400 doesn't like freshly oiled filters. Won't start well after fresh filter is installed, restricts flow too much. (I used UNI foam filter oil, saturated the filter, squeezed out excess, then installed.)

What oil should I be using, and should I not totally saturate the filter? (Maybe the UNI oil is just TOO thick . . .)

What could be happening is that you have, or had, a bad combintation of filter and oil (airways in the foam too small, oil too thick), or just too much oil. Unlike the plain engine oil we used to use for this years ago real filter oils are designed to thicken into more of a gluey paste or grease than a fluid. If you use a liquid oil and either pour it on or dip the element, you really have to "remove the excess" thoroughly. You shouldn't wring the element, but you do need to squeeze out everything you realistically can. If you don't, the volatile carriers in some filter oils will evaporate faster than the excess drips away, and the oil will set up while it's still partially clogging the filter.

A good, high performance filter helps this, because they are harder to plug up this way. White Bros., Twin Air, Uni, are all good stuff. Not over oiling helps too (thank you, Captain Obvious).

One of the easiest to use really effective oils I know of is Maxima FAB1 spray. Held about 10" away from the element, it sprays a nice wide pattern that helps distribute it evenly. Spray some on and then, wearing latex gloves, work it in as thoroughly as you can, inside and out. I usually make about 3 applications of the spray and work each in until I'm satisfied that the oil goes all the way through the foam, then install it and let it sit at least overnight before using it. Maxima or Uni spray cleaner takes the stuff right out, and it's so tacky that you can use it to seal the flange instead of grease.

Simple Green works great for me. Warm water with Simple Green in the sink. Air dry overnight and oil in the am.

Thats what I use, your filters will last much longer!

Now, the problem I've had in past is this: my '99 YZ400 doesn't like freshly oiled filters. Won't start well after fresh filter is installed, restricts flow too much. (I used UNI foam filter oil, saturated the filter, squeezed out excess, then installed.)

What oil should I be using, and should I not totally saturate the filter? (Maybe the UNI oil is just TOO thick . . .)

Are you allowing your filter to completely dry before installing it? The solvent in the oil must be allowed to dry (evaporate) so it tacks up before starting the bike. Yes, you should be completely saturating the filter then squeezing out the excess, by doing this you are ensuring the entire filter is coated with oil.

One of the easiest to use really effective oils I know of is Maxima FAB1 spray. Held about 10" away from the element, it sprays a nice wide pattern that helps distribute it evenly. Spray some on and then, wearing latex gloves, work it in as thoroughly as you can, inside and out. I usually make about 3 applications of the spray and work each in until I'm satisfied that the oil goes all the way through the foam, then install it and let it sit at least overnight before using it. Maxima or Uni spray cleaner takes the stuff right out, and it's so tacky that you can use it to seal the flange instead of grease.

Grayracer,

It's a UNI filter, although the foam does seem to be more dense than the stock one. The Maxima spray-on stuff seems like it would lend itself against over-saturation . . . guess the "dip and squeeze out excess" method isn't the hot setup! I'm gonna try the FAB1. Thanks again for tip!

Sorry I do not clean my filter. I use Ready filters, use it once, toss it. Install new one(pre oiled) on my way. Actually I saved them, I will eventually clean and reuse.

Simple green, Dawn, and hot water....dry....Maxima FFT worked in with gloves untill fully saturated.

Good to go, and never dust in the intake boot when I check after the next filter change.

.... <SNIP>.....Thirdly, credit to Sir Thumpalot for the best drying idea I ever used: I take the rinsed filter element and set it over the intake end of a high output squirrel cage fan (mine came from an old range hood that was replaced by a microwave oven), turn it on and return 1-2 hours later to a dry filter. Since it's a dual fan, I can dry two filters at once, one on each end.

I know I said 3, but for those of you with pre-'03 bikes: This Makes it Easier

LOL, thanks for the credit. :bonk: I stick one to my 2000-cfm 3/4 HP blower and it's dry in 10 minutes. :applause:

some pj1 foam filter cleaner works prety good and cheap

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