Toolbag supplies?

Some good ideas so far. Here's what I'm thinking:

spark plug wrench

JB weld

zip ties

rag

leatherman tool

tire levers

patch kit

$5.00 and a condom.

"5.00 and a condom"

somebody has been to the donkey show in TJ...

I'd say more important would be:

27mm wrench or socket(rear wheel and swingarm)

8,10,12,14,17mm(front axle) wrenchs or socket

phillips head and flat head screwdriver

needle nose vice grips

You can pack a plug and plug wrench but for a fourstroke I'd leave it be unless you're going to be forging high water.

and whatever spare parts you may need i.e.(tube, tire irons etc)

Thanks TimBRP - Thats more like it.

Hello Roadcam

Don't let some of those mess with you the 650L is a great machine. I had a stock tool bag on my L and I wanted to carry more stuff. I looked all over for a nice but small tail bag. I couldn't find any small enough for the rear fender or big enough for every thing I wanted to carry. So I bought a Joe Rocket tank bag and modified it to work on the rear where the old bag was. Now I can carry every thing I need. The stock wrenches that come with the L are not the best in the world. With the larger bag you can carry better tools. You can go to my garage and check out the tool bag if you like. Hope this may have helped. Good Luck. :applause::bonk:

Hello Roadcam

Don't let some of those mess with you the 650L is a great machine. I had a stock tool bag on my L and I wanted to carry more stuff. I looked all over for a nice but small tail bag. I couldn't find any small enough for the rear fender or big enough for every thing I wanted to carry. So I bought a Joe Rocket tank bag and modified it to work on the rear where the old bag was. Now I can carry every thing I need. The stock wrenches that come with the L are not the best in the world. With the larger bag you can carry better tools. You can go to my garage and check out the tool bag if you like. Hope this may have helped. Good Luck. :applause::bonk:

I'm sorry I meant Wheelnut46

Mountain Road Madness, 2 questions:

1. What tires are those in the picture? Do you like them? Capable off road? Mileage? etc.

2. How do you compare the Honda with the Suzuki? My son's sensai is looking to get the Suzuki based on brand loyalty.

Mountain Road Madness, 2 questions:

1. What tires are those in the picture? Do you like them? Capable off road? Mileage? etc.

2. How do you compare the Honda with the Suzuki? My son's sensai is looking to get the Suzuki based on brand loyalty.

I run Pirelli Scorpion 80 % street ant 20 % trail. They work real well on the street. They have a good bit in the corners. I mostly ride street. They are not much for trail. They wear good I think I got about 6000 miles out of my last set. The comparsion between the Honda and Suzuki are. The Suzuki has a lower seat height which fits my wife well, also she is a diehard Suzuki fan. Seems like the Honda has more low end torque and the Suzuki has more at the top end. Basically there is not much difference between the two. Just depends on what you like. I'm a diehard Honda guy myself. :applause::bonk:

Here are some essentials: the standard kit contains a multi-tool wrench and a spark plug socket (which is turned by the multi-tool). Get both, and get a spare spark plug. Other than these "stock items" the most important other tool you will use will be a CO2 tire inflator, to deal with flats. The next most important items to carry will be a spare clutch lever, a spare clutch perch, and a spare brake lever. Another handy item is a Leatherman tool. All of this will fit in that little red bag, and will get you out of many common jams.

Better than the LeatherMan!

I've had many "pocket tool kits", but the best one I have found to date is the Victorinox Swiss Tool by the same company that makes the Swiss Army Knife. I keep it on my belt and can't get along with out it. The blades lock securely open and it has a fairly usable set of pliers, and a great selection of tools. Some of the neat features not found on other tools is a HD wood saw, course and fine metal files, hacksaw, wood chisel, HD Screwdriver. These are available from the outside of the tool and provide a comfortable grip when using the pliers, unlike the LeatherMan, which is uncomfortably sharp. I find that it's all I need for most odd jobs and highly recommend it.

Features:

Pliers (multi-usage)

2mm Screwdriver

3mm Screwdriver

Wire Cutter

5mm Screwdriver

Bottle Opener

7.5mm Screwdriver

Large Blade

Wood Saw

Reamer / Punch

Phillips Screwdriver

Chisel and Scraper

Strong Crate Opener

Wire Bender

Wire Stripper

Wire Scraper

Can Opener

9 inch Ruler

230mm Ruler

Electrical Crimper

Lanyard Hole

Metal Saw

Metal File

Serrated Blade

I used to carry a bunch of tools but never seriously broke down so the set got smaller and smaller. The "L" is pretty simple and very reliable in my experience.

1. Spare plug, plug wrench, optional since I routinely replace $2 bucks cheap insurance.

2. Wrenches for front/rear tire removal, I use an aluminum tire iron with a 24mm box wrench end (it also has a 3/8" socket drive for the wrench end, add a 4" socket extension bar), tire patch stuff, CO2/handpump combo, second tire iron (standard style you will need in addition to the aluminum one for a dismount) Flats are the only thing I ever had on the trail....no other problems. Cut two pieces of plastic milk jug to protect rim against steel tire iron.

3. small vice grip, used it to fix the shift lever on another bike

4. small crescent wrench, probably useless

5. combo screw driver, a must

6. Wave Leatherman, used it to cut some food once on the trail, good needle nose, file, saws, small screw drivers, scissors, knife etc. All locking, the only way to go.

7. Hex set. I cut 1" pieces to adopt to socket set (4mm through 10mm) doesn't take much room and is light weight. I replaced carb connectors with hex bolts. Sockets 4,6,8,10,12mm.

8. 8,10,12,17,18mm box wrenches, 8mm bent a bit for valve adjustments

9. small socket handle I can use for tight places, drives various screw driver bits on one end and sockets (1/4" drive) on the other. 3/8" to 1/4" adopter.

Use my trail tools to do as much routine work on the bike, then have added and subtracted from there. Like I said the bike is so reliable 5 to 6 lbs. of tools that will fit into a small rear fender bag (even stock) is all you'll likely need in my opinion. You're not going to change the oil, or tear down the engine on the trail. Take a tow strap for that. I do carry a 12' nylon tow strap, wonder if its still good or rotten by now.

I removed 10 (probably more) pounds of dead weight with un-corking, remove rear foot pegs, remove excess plastic (like the wings), replace stock pipe with aftermarket.

Spare parts.....I try to have things like a couple of fuses, couple hose clamps, 3' of safety wire, couple feet of electric tape, 1/2 tube of JB weld, couple feet of "duck" tape, to repair the various little stuff that can break, leak, detach, etc. I wrap the tapes around a little plastic container then put the small parts (fuses, wire, clamps, JB, in the container (perscription bottle). The only lever I carry (only on long trips) is a spare shift (foot) lever. I have brush guards protecting the handle levers, never had a break on some nasty falls.

Sounds like a lot but it's really not. I use smaller versions of the tools then add to leverage of the various tools by attaching the tire iron to the selected tool handle using a couple of bolts and 1 1/2" steel bars with holes drilled (probably need a picture to understand that).

Finally a small first aid kit, lightweight insurance again, air pressure gage, compass. Maps help keep you out of trouble too.

Hope this helps.

You might want to add a tube repair kit to that list of tools. Another

useful thing to have is a piece of old tube that can be used if you ever

get a large hole in your tire. It would have to be from something that

has a thick tube because you use it between your inner-tube and the

tire.

Rgds,

Bob East

Carry a one of the TrailToolz toolkits. You can find them at www.TrailToolz.com . Also, take a look at this list, it might have some other things you might want to consider:

1. Spark plug wrench that fits your bike.

2. Spare Spark Plug for the bike you are riding.

3. Chain Repair Kit (Spare master link, Spare Clip, a few spare links, Chain Breaker).

Matches or a lighter.

4. Large Zip Ties.

5. Duct Tape (You can wrap a foot of it around a wrench to save space).

6. Hi temp epoxy putty (like JB weld but, dries quick and doesn't run).

7. About 6 feet of aluminum wire equivalent (something that will bend and not break).

8. Electrical Wire (for electrical repairs or can be used to clean out a clogged jet).

9. Leatherman multi- tool or equivalent.

10. Tire repair kit (Patches, Glue, small tire Irons, small pump or CO2 filler, small bottle of dish soap (to lube the bead and to clean up afterward).

11. Axle wrench (front & rear combo).

12. Light duty front innertubes (light duty to limit weight

and space).

13. Homemade radiator bypass kit (so you can bypass one of the two if you put a hole in it).

14. Tow Strap.

15. e clip for the carb needle - awful easy to lose this baby, taped to the spare plug holder.

16. Spare thingy that inside the valve on a tire tube - same idea, wrapped in tape.

17. About 3 feet of spare fuel line (can be used for repairs or to siphon gas in a pinch).

18. Small flashlight.

19. Washcloth or shop rag.

20. Plastic Gloves.

21. Emergency contact numbers/ Name, address, D.O.B., etc.

22. 800mg Ibuprofen.

23. Also suggest you paint the tools bright yellow – so you can find them in the dirt.

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