Bent rear rotor

Tonight I was changing my rear tire and I think that when I did I bent my rear rotor :bonk :lol: : I reinstalled the wheel with the slightly bent rotor. My question is will I do much more damage if I ride it this way :banghead::banghead:

Thanks for your help.

P.s. Does anyone want to sell me one for my 03 xr650r?

Slight bend... It'll make your rear brakes feel spongy. My '97 XR400 had a slightly bent warped rotor. It was noticeable. when looking at it, but not while the brakes were being applied. I usually don't use the rear brakes that often anyway.

With a bent/warped rotor, the caliper will have to move side to side rapidly as it clamps the rotor. This will cause some wear on the caliper pins. It really depends on how badly the rotor is warped whether this will cause any damage or not. Best bet is to change the rotor out immediately, since they are not too expensive. Barring that, I would certainly make sure the caliper mounting pins are well lubricated to prevent any additional damage until the rotor can be replaced.

Thanks for the info. The rotor isnt bent very badly. I do notice the caliper moving when I spin the wheel. I will change it soon. Do you think that I can take it off and straighten it???

Do you think that I can take it off and straighten it???

I would certainly try to straighten it before buying a new one.

You might try a large vise with expanded jaws, or even try to straighten it

caveman-style with a hammer, but placing it on a surface such as a hard

piece of plywood on a concrete floor, and also use a hard piece of wood (like an oak 4x4) on the topside to buffer the hammer blows.

Don't kill it with the hammer, just try and re-form/coerce it. Controlled, but

effective.

don't remove it from the wheel ... use the largest "cresent" wrench to work out the bend. if you remove it or use a hammer there is no control over the force you will apply. I don't even think you need to buy one.

don't remove it from the wheel ... use the largest "cresent" wrench to work out the bend. if you remove it or use a hammer there is no control over the force you will apply. I don't even think you need to buy one.

Good thinking. :banghead:

He could check for the "run-out" while the wheel is on the bike, and mark the rotor at this (or these) point(s), then use the crescent wrench method. Might even not have to remove the wheel. Just keep making small adjustments until it is re-straightened, and no longer wavers between the caliper pads.

Good info thanks. Like most of us im sure my wife does not like me spending money on my screw ups

You tell her?

Thanks for the info... I used the old coat hanger on the swing arm and the crescent wrench method... worked nicely

Thanks

if its like a thousandths in the outside, it wont do anything. if its half an inch, it will work just fine :banghead::banghead::lol: it all depends on how bent it is.

We have also fixed many bent rotors with a very large crescent wrench on the bike. That is only situation where I would tolerate using crescent wrench on any toys.

yeah it was about 1/8th of an inch but it is all fixed now. I liked the idea about putting a coat hanger on the swing arm barely touching the disc and then spinning it and marking the spots where the disc moved away from the hanger :banghead::banghead:

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now