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ARin

Quick release Fender packs, DIY, picture tutorial

37 posts in this topic

I wanted to be able to remove my fender packs when i dont need them...but i also like the security of the bolt-on design, rather than the strap on type of packs.

Here is my solution.

Purchase the required amount of Clevis pins, and hitch pin clips from your local hardware store.

http://www.planetblade.com/arins/fenderpack/1.jpg

Chuck the pins in the worlds smallest vise and use a cutting wheel , or hacksaw to cut them just above the first hitch pin hole. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE WEAR SAFETY GLASSES!!! Cutting wheels have a tendency to fly apart whenever they want to...and riding is tough with one eye.

http://www.planetblade.com/arins/fenderpack/2.jpg

Then chamfer and smooth the rough ends with the worlds smallest bench grinder. *I have a pretty small garage, so you will notice many of my tools are also of Liliputian dimensions:D

http://www.planetblade.com/arins/fenderpack/3.jpg

Now, you have used the bolt holes in your fender pack as a template to drill the appropriate holes in your fender. Here we see the trimmed Clevis pins with washers inserted into the underside of the fender holes, and epoxied in place.

http://www.planetblade.com/arins/fenderpack/4.jpg

Here we see the finished product from the top of the fender. This is the way it will look when you dont want to lug around your packs.

http://www.planetblade.com/arins/fenderpack/5.jpg

Now, you can use the hitch pins to secure your fender bag in a snap...and still take it off easily!!

http://www.planetblade.com/arins/fenderpack/7.jpg

This fender pack is from http://www.dirt-bike-gear.com

http://www.planetblade.com/arins/fenderpack/6.jpg

Here is my headlight shroud getting the same treatment.

http://www.planetblade.com/arins/fenderpack/8.jpg

And the finished product, the way it looks when you dont want to take your packs.

http://www.planetblade.com/arins/fenderpack/9.jpg

And here it is with my moose tool pack attached

http://www.planetblade.com/arins/fenderpack/10.jpg

http://www.planetblade.com/arins/fenderpack/11.jpg

All done!!!!

http://www.planetblade.com/arins/fenderpack/12.jpg

Thanks for watching! :banghead:

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That is awesome. It is posts like these with step by step pics and tutorials that make thumpertalk the place where I like to spend my time.

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Pretty cool ideas there, and simple too! I just went and bolted the rear Moose fender pack since I use it to carry water for my buds who just dont have the Camel Back yet...

Jesse

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Thats an awsome idea. Thanks for all the detail its a big help. I didn't want to buy a bolt on bag but now I'm in. :banghead::banghead:

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Great guide.

Doubt that epoxy is going to last. Especially since you have stuff in the pack bouncing around.

Why not just screw a bolt up through the fender? It holds itself in place and you just have to drill a little hole through it for the hitch pin.

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I like the idea with the clevis pins, but the point about the epoxy is valid. I went with wingnuts on mine so I just have some holes to deal with when I take the bag off...SC

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Well, if the epoxy gives...then all i will have is holes to deal with also. but a clevis pin is STILL faster than a wingnut! :banghead:

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great job on the tutorial. I have been looking for the best way to mount fender bags to mine and have now found the perfect way to do it. thanks for taking the time to detail this out.

:banghead:

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Great idea

I wouldnt even bother fixing those pins, and would store them inside a bag, so if you wanted to use it, just install the clips and secure them through the bag.

that way you avoid your leg getting stuck when jumping off the bike, tearing your trousers etc

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I like the front pack. As for the rear one ,I guess it's ok if you like getting your ass slapped with a bag of tools when you hang your butt out over a whooped section.

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getting your ass slapped a litte is no biggie, as long as i have the tools i need for trailside repair.

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I do not prefer to have something rattling around and tugging at my kidneys all day.

Just personal preference. Id rather let the bike carry the weight, than me.

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I do not prefer to have something rattling around and tugging at my kidneys all day.

What do you carry thats so heavy? I tuck a few wrenches in my camel back, maybe a few Allen keys,spare fasteners,tie wraps,a disposable camera and toilet paper in my fanny pack. I let my friends carry all the serious hard wear. I use the excuse my bike already weighs too much.

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What do you carry thats so heavy? I tuck a few wrenches in my camel back, maybe a few Allen keys,spare fasteners,tie wraps,a disposable camera and toilet paper in my fanny pack. I let my friends carry all the serious hard wear. I use the excuse my bike already weighs too much.

haha! actually, everything i carry in my packs, could easily fit in my Camelback mule....BUT, i prefer to carry the weight on my bike, rather than my body...i already have 3 liters of water and a snickers bar in the camelback.

:banghead:

Just personal preference i suppose.

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I will second that..... let the bike do as much of the work as possible. Carrying weight on your body does tire you out. I have done 10-day camping trips on my KLR 650.... I found it more comfortable to get my back-pack off and onto the bike. Just my 2 cents.

Jesse

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Hey ARin,

I like the look of your frame guards in pic #12. I currently am using Acerbis units but they don't cover the rear brake cylinder.

What brand are your guards?

Nigel

Sydney

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Hey ARin,

I like the look of your frame guards in pic #12. I currently am using Acerbis units but they don't cover the rear brake cylinder.

What brand are your guards?

Nigel

Sydney

Nigel, they are UFO brand...and if you find a decent source for them, let me know...every time i have ordered a set, they have taken several weeks to get.

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