Stainless Re-usable filters vs paper?

Newbie asks: I know it's been addressed to some degree from reading old threads but how easily do the metal flakes come out of the stainless filters. I'm thinking if they don't come out too easily are we not going to ultimately slow the flow through the filter over time. I'm all for the stainless if I truely will not need to buy another for the life of the bike but what do you guys think? Jon

I put mine in a mason jar half filled with white gas, seal it up, then shake it like an epileptic on crack. I then blow the filter out with my compressor and do it again. Lather, rinse, repeat. I don't ever get it like new, but pretty close...SC

At about $3.50 a pop for an aftermarket paper filter, I always put in a new filter at each oil change.......cheap insurance and I never have to worry about particles/shavings in the filter and whether I got them all out at cleaning. I followed this regiment with my 03' WR250 and after a thousand miles, the valve clearances were still spot on.

I'd rather pay a little and have peace of mind with a new filter at each change.

Just my two cents worth.

On this topic I bought a K&N oil filter, it was made from metal, not paper, but I dont know whether it is a reusable one? It only cost about $35 AUD????

I love my reusable filter. I change my oil every two or three rides. It cleans very easily. I was paying $13.00 for a paper filter at my dealer and could only find them as low as 7 bucks on the net. Just way easier for me to have a reusable. No issues so far.

i used to use simple green-a water hose and then some compressed air and got rid of all the flakes

On this topic I bought a K&N oil filter, it was made from metal, not paper, but I dont know whether it is a reusable one? It only cost about $35 AUD????

Its actually made from plastic mesh. I tore one apart one day to figure out what it was made of. Clean it off, and re-use it a few times, then get a new one when it starts to get clogged.

if reusing the filter, be sure to check for cracks in the filter net

for removing the shavings, brake parts cleaner & old toothbrush do the job

before installing it, always rinse the filter with fresh oil

thing that actually goes bad on a filter are those 2 rubber gaskets

in time they pressurize, but after few years they still arent due to change

My worry is what happens when you clean one of the ss filters (especially in a jar or with compressed air) and a metal shaving ends up on the return side (wrong side) of the filter and you don't see it and put the filter back in? As soon as oil is pumped through it, it will get pumped straight into your engine somwhere. That's the only reason I will not buy one of the filters.

At about $3.50 a pop for an aftermarket paper filter.

Where are you getting them for $3.50? :D

then shake it like an epileptic on crack.

Huh? I am trying to picture this.....

My worry is what happens when you clean one of the ss filters (especially in a jar or with compressed air) and a metal shaving ends up on the return side (wrong side) of the filter and you don't see it and put the filter back in? As soon as oil is pumped through it, it will get pumped straight into your engine somwhere. That's the only reason I will not buy one of the filters.

I would not just drop it into a jar and shake it.

Hold it with your thumb "sealing" the hole in the end on the gasket... then lower it into the solvent and swish it around.

The filter is clean inside when it comes out of the bike, and you are correct... you do not want to contaminate it.

Alternatively, spray brake parts cleaner through the filter from the inside... never spray the outside directly... that'll force crap deeper.

Also... never use a brush on the stock brass filters used on pre 2003 Yamahas. The brass can be easily damaged and you may not see it. I'd even be very careful of stainless, but supposedly they can handle it.

i use a oem 426 SS filter in my 450. works well if you clean it right!!

CRD SS filter... Rinse in Paraffin, spray with Brake cleaner, blow out with Compressed air... and installed, I change oil every 3 rides, so makes it A: Cheaper B: better for the bike

I would not just drop it into a jar and shake it.

Hold it with your thumb "sealing" the hole in the end on the gasket... then lower it into the solvent and swish it around.

The filter is clean inside when it comes out of the bike, and you are correct... you do not want to contaminate it.

Alternatively, spray brake parts cleaner through the filter from the inside... never spray the outside directly... that'll force crap deeper.

Also... never use a brush on the stock brass filters used on pre 2003 Yamahas. The brass can be easily damaged and you may not see it. I'd even be very careful of stainless, but supposedly they can handle it.

I can agree with this. I always use the stock brass filter in my '00WR400F. I change oil every single ride, but change the filter every third oil change.

I have between 5k and 7k miles on this engine. Some of them are pretty hard miles. No discernable wear or compression loss. No change in valve clearance. No engine failures, knock on wood.

Not all aftermarket products are improvements. Many times, the Japanese Engineers that design these things know exactly what they are doing. They are considering the big picture, not just the part the aftermarket company is interested in replacing. Choose wisely.

Stainless filters have been around a long time. Race cars with engines that cost 2-10 times what our whole bikes do have been using them successfully for years. All this paranoia about metal particles left in the filter is not necessary. A strong magnet passed about the inside of the filter will get most anything. No oil filter will catch everything.

Paranoia? maybe, but a strong magnet won't pick up aluminum.

Stainless filters have been around a long time. Race cars with engines that cost 2-10 times what our whole bikes do have been using them successfully for years.

They also use K&N air filters (or NO air filter), which are proven to filter extremely poorly compared to OEM paper filters.

Race engines may cost many tens of thousands of dollars, but they are designed to go only 500 to 1000 miles between rebuilds....

...and they often blow up.

SS filters work great. If you are paranoid about them dont use them. It works great in my bike. Its not that hard to clean one without getting contaminates on the inside, not exactly rocket science. This battle could go on for ever.

Many times, the Japanese Engineers that design these things know exactly what they are doing.
Many times they dont, they are just doing what is most cost effective for their company too. Take the crank case breather hose for example, they sure as hell didnt put alot of thought into that one. How about the decomp plug on my 04, not exactly an engineering marvel. Choose wisely is great advice. :D

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