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Smiticus

Best Chain?

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I'll be gearing my 01 426 more for trails by picking up a new front and 51 rear sproket. As far as the chain goes, do I need a longer one? I know stock is 520x114. And What is the best chain for the most reasonable price? I've heard o-rings are the way to go...

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Regina chains are the best by far. They are expensive, but will last for a very long time.

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According to a number of experienced riders on this forum, Regina chains are highly recommended, along with Ironman sprockets. I just purchased a Regina ORN (O-ring type) chain, along with Ironman sprockets (front & back). I haven't installed them yet but I will soon. Regarding longevity, people on this forum say if you properly maintain the chain (O-ring type) you can get a couple of years riding out of the combo. The stock chain on my Yz 450f, just kept stretching and stretching, even with proper maintenance. Just remember with a O-ring type chain, DO NOT use a high pressure power washer (or the typical Car Wash high pressure hose) right up against the chain; you will blow out the grease that is impregnated in the chain, and kill it's longevity. Just wash the chain off with low pressure water (and maybe a little Simple Green) or other cleaner, while scrubbing with a NYLON bristle brush (don't use steel bristle, they will damage O-rings) than spray WD-40 on the chain (to displace water) and later on apply your proper chain lube (the Maxima synthetic chain lube is well thought of) If you do this and keep the proper tension, you should get a long life out of the chain and sprockets.

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I put a Regina o-ring on my 426 in May 2004 and adjusted it once .......sold the bike in December of 04. The bike was ridden almost every single weekend for 8 months and only one chain adjustment.....very nice ! :applause:

BTW... I got mine on eBay...cheap.

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Enlighten me on "a very long time." Months/years??

My Regina has been on for almost 2 years. I did adjust it once after the first ride, but so far so good. I'm sold on Regina. :applause:

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The Regina ORN on my 450 is over a year old and showing no signs. The one I had on my CR500 went beyond two years. And compared to other high quality O-ring chains, they aren't expensive, really. About $70 for an ORN, $85 for the ZRN (Z-ring, the counterpart of the X-ring DID's)

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I keep having to buy new chains every two months or so and I only ride once or twice a month. Is it because I ride at Glamis all the time or am I doing something wrong. I heard that the o-rings and x-rings, are bad for the sand because the sand just eats away at the rubber. Has anyone had an o-ring chain or any chain for that matter last a decent amount of time in the sand.

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At least half of my riding is in the desert. More than half on the CR500 was.

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yamaha9985 im picking up a DID Xring ill letcha know how it goes after tomorrow night.. :applause: night ride YEA...

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BTW - DID has recently released the ERT2 which has a tensile strength greater than the Reginas.

I have yet to try it, but sure hope it performs better than the earlier versions.

And I'm not a fan of o-ring chains unless you don't plan on lubing the chain on a regular basis.

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The tensile strength of any of the premium chains is at a high enough level that it will never be an issue on an MX bike unless you run the chain way too tight. So not picking a Regina because it has "only" a 7000 psi tensile rating

instead of 9000 is overkill taken to new levels. That kind of strength simply isn't needed.

As for the statement about lubrication, I'm not sure what you're getting at, but I lube mine either before each ride, or after each wash, which is pretty much the same thing. One thing is that if you use a lube that dries "clean", that is, non-greasy/sticky, and lube the chain far enough ahead that it has a chance to dry, you don't have to worry about it picking up crud and sticking it around the seals, which could damage them.

The other thing is that while putting lube on a sealed chain does prevent rust and helps lube the outer rollers, the sprockets, and the external surfaces of the seals, it can't get to the pins and bushings that really carry the load. For that, the chain has to depend for its whole life on the lube that was put there to begin with and the integrity of the seals. For this reason, the lube you choose should also be one that can be readily washed away with soap or a de-greaser like Simple Green and low pressure water. That way, what little dirt does collect on it will wash away with the lube. This may not be your way, and it may not even be the best way, but it's how I do it, and the results speak well for themselves. IMO, more O-ring chains have been ruined prematurely by pressure washers and from ring damage and contamination or loss of lube during improper cleaning than by anything that happened to them in the field.

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I have a renthal o ring chain(lil spendy,regina has a better price) its what the dealer had in stock when I bought my bike.I never even road it with the stock chain.This chain was adjusted once since last november and I have about 40 hours of riding on it according to the hour meter.The directions that come with it say DO NOT lube the chain.You can soak it in mineral oil over night and then dry it completely but,chain lube is not suppose to be used.

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DaveJ....please dont take this the wrong way....you are the the motivation for my 426 to 450 transformation and for that there is no way I could repay you... :)

having said that ( generic businessman speak), the beauty of "real world testimonies" is that they are just that....real. Not like unsubstantiated numbers in an advertisement or review. (BTW.....tech info in reviews is supplied by who......yup...the manufacturer! :applause: )

Regina....for a thumper.

(I have an RK 520MXGB on my YZ250....non o-ring. I has been adjusted 3 times in the last 7 months which is nothing to sneeze at....but of course it's not a thumper :eek: )

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I have a renthal o ring chain(lil spendy,regina has a better price) its what the dealer had in stock when I bought my bike.I never even road it with the stock chain.This chain was adjusted once since last november and I have about 40 hours of riding on it according to the hour meter.The directions that come with it say DO NOT lube the chain.You can soak it in mineral oil over night and then dry it completely but,chain lube is not suppose to be used.
Did you know that you actually do have a Regina chain? They make the chains for Renthal. The only difference is the price and the name.

Soaking in oil is a bad idea whoever recommended it, IMO, because it results in an oily chain, which attracts dirt, it requires a couple of days to completely dry, and still won't do anything to lube the interior of the chain.

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did not know it was a regina,however,the instructions that came with the chain say mineral oil soaking,over night,which allows the oil to penetrate the seals(so it said).Then clean the chain off before you use it again...I have yet to try it though

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On the subject of soaking in oil, it occurred to me that there is a way to see if that will actually oil the interior of the chain or not. I may try it myself, because I'd like to have a way to replenish the lubrication within the seals after an extended period of use.

My thought is that the bushings at the ends of the chain and the master link could be cleaned and dried , then assembled with 4 good, lightly lubed O-rings. The chain could then be soaked in whatever, dried, and the master link disassembled to see how much oil, if any, made it to the pins.

Another thought I've had before is to slip a small piece of plastic such as a strip cut from a tear-off under each seal to "open" it during this operation. If it worked, I might look for a low melt point, moly bearing EP grease to use for the purpose. As long as mine already last, it's almost not worth the trouble, but hey....

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