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flintlock28

Can O ring chains be cleaned w/ kerosene??

44 posts in this topic

I probably will soon be replacing my stock chain, and both sprockets with the package deal from Ironman sprockets (i.e. front sprocket, rear sprocket, and choice of regina o ring or non- o ring chain) My riding is probably gonna be 70% Motocross and 30 % trails/woods riding. I currently like to take off the stock chain when done riding, and degrease it in Kerosene along with cleaning both sprockets in Kerosene, than using Maxima Wax based chain lube.

If I go with a O ring type chain, can I use Kerosene to clean it?? or will the kerosene wash out the impregnated lubricant?? Or should I just use a non O ring chain, and continue the procedure I use now??

I'm not going to race the bike (at least not for a year or more) but I'm wondering what's the smartest way to go?? O ring or non O ring chain?

Let me know what you do...... Don

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i like a non o-ring because they weigh less and have less drag.dont get me wrong o-ring is good but some quality non o-ring chains have a higher tensile strength than o-ring .its all preference.also on a non o-ring you can use wd40 and clean them with whatever you want.rocky mountain has the best prices on either.

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This subject has been covered in great depth, repeatedly, over and over and over. Do a search on o-ring or x-ring and you will find enough reading material to occupy yourself for hours. Have fun.

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If you get an Oring chain, ditch the cleaning procedure and enjoy. Anything will be better than stock.

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If you get an Oring chain, ditch the cleaning procedure and enjoy. Anything will be better than stock.

Ditto. My x-ring gets a brief hosing off with the gaden hose, if I'm feeling spunky and the last ride was muddy then I might run the nylon brush over it once or twice but that's it.

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i like a non o-ring because they weigh less...
The Regina ORS O-ring chain is a whopping 3.4 oz heavier for a 116 pin chain than their premium non-O ring chain.
and have less drag
At any given moment, there are only 8 O-rings in motion, and of those, only the four at the front sprocket are moving as much as 15 degrees. What drag? What the chain feels like on the stand does not translate into drag that can be felt on the track or trail, and I doubt it would add up to anything significant on a dyno.
some quality non o-ring chains have a higher tensile strength than o-ring
Name one with a tensile strength higher than than the 8100 lb tensile strength of the Regina ORS. Having trouble? The DID ERT is the only one I know of.

My Reginas run for about two years or better with very little of what you would really call maintenance to get them to do that. Hose them off, put a dry, non-sticky lube on them to prevent rust, that's it.

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grayracer you've sold me on the O ring model........

Oh, by the way...would it be o.k. to use Maxima wax based chain lube on the Regina O ring chain??

Don

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Sure. But if you have access to the Maxima line, I think their Synthetic Chain Guard is a better choice. Remember that with an O-ring chain, the pins and inner bushings are sealed, so the lube you use won't go there. It does lube the outer rollers, though, and the sprockets, and the external surfaces of the rings.

Two things are important to me in a chain lube. It has to lube, obviously, but more important than that in this case is that it not be oily, greasy, or sticky after it dries, so that it won't gather dirt and sand and damage the rings, and that it washes of reasonably easily with Simple Green and water. Maxima SCG does that. Their wax based lube might too, as might a number of other things.

Don't use a pressure washer on the chain except from a distance of two feet or more AND only from the side to avoid driving water under it.

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And why not? Do you have something against doubling the life of your rear chain while simultaneously cutting out 75% of your chain maintenance?

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if you go with a sealed chain, i would go with an X-RING chain. because the x-ring has less drag than an O-RING and still seals out the dirt and water. another benefit with a sealed chain is longer chain and sprocket life. :)

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The X-ring is over $30 more expensive than my Regina O-ring chain. Worth it? Opinions vary. Me? I don't think so.

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Get the X-ring chain as they are the longest lasting chains. Clean in WD-40 (don't listen to anybody that say it harms O-rings) using a grunge brush, and use a good lube. I like the Bel-ray Superclean.

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Don't use a pressure washer on the chain except from a distance of two feet or more AND only from the side to avoid driving water under it.

Gray,

This only applies to the O-Ring chain, correct? Seems like common sense, but I want to make sure, cause I've been pressure washing the hell out of my non o-ring chain.

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Get the X-ring chain as they are the longest lasting chains. Clean in WD-40 (don't listen to anybody that say it harms O-rings) using a grunge brush, and use a good lube. I like the Bel-ray Superclean.
If you need a grunge brush, you should use a different lube. Water and detergent or Simple Green should do the job without brushing.

So far, the only Regina ORS I've actually worn out went for more than two years on a CR500. Beat that? And for only $85, too.

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Gray racer doesn't need my endorsement but I'll give it anyway. O-ring or X-rings are fine. I have to say I was easily able to stretch my DID non-o ring and usually don't stretch my O ring or X ring. May I also say that steel sprockets are doing well for me. Primary Drive from Rocky Mountain MX are cheap and are waring well for me. I currently run the X ring primary drive(curious about the X-ring) chain as well. After the first ride she hasn't stretched again. No I've never felt the power boost or drain by switching back and forth. I change as a set. One thing different, I clean with a steel brush after every ride and re lube but I do get some greasy buildup with chain wax. Shame on me.

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Unless you race, ONLY get an o-ring chain. Keep it clean so the grime wont grind down your sprockets.

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And why not? Do you have something against doubling the life of your rear chain while simultaneously cutting out 75% of your chain maintenance?

Getting double life out of a ring chain over a standard chain is relative to several things, and there is no way you can count on it.

If you get two years of hard riding out of a quality ring chain, then you performed proper care of the drive, AND you had zero problems with the rings.

Plus, you got lucky. Lucky because nothing on the trail, that was out of your control, tore any rings and ruined the chain.

Problem is, folks buy ring chains using the flawed logic that they are a maintenance free item.

I want to know how we can reduce our maintenance by 75% by simply going to a ring chain?

Proper maintenance of a chain and sprocket drive consists of proper cleaning/adjustment/lubrication.

CLEANING:

Standard chain can be easily, and quickly, cleaned off of just about any and all debris within a few moments, and without worry that the spray may damage a ring, or push water under.

Even if you are unfortunate enough to still be using a crappy sticky goo for a lube, the cleaning of the non-ring chain can be much faster and easier. Mainly due to the fact that you don not have to be tedious to keep from damaging rings. Scrug the heck out of it with whatever brush...pressure spray it...no worry about what sort of chemicals come in contact with it...

Seems like a no-brainer to me that on the cleaning issue, the ring chain is NOT less maintenance, but rather more.

ADJUSTMENT:

There is absolutely no difference in the adjustment procedures for both types of chains. However, some folks who have smaller cc bikes tend to want to run a ring chain...(again often due to the misinformation they get from other riders). More often than not, a 125cc bike was not designed to be ran with a ring chain. There simply isn't enough clearance, between the CS centerline and the engine case, for the extra width of a ring chain to run. The conventional remedy for this is to shim the CS sprocket out away from the case to allow the ring chain to run. This immediately places the planes of the front and rear sprockets out of alignment with no chance of getting them correct without removing the shim.

Again, the non-ring chain wins...it can run on ANY bike.

LUBRICATION:

You can run a ring chain without providing any additional lube at all and the chain will make many hours, as long as the rings remain intact and do their jobs.

But, the rings will not stay intact, and will fail at their job unless they are replentished with lubricant on a regular basis. The rubber the rings are made of require lubricant to keep them supple.

Also, the friction point between roller and bushing is not protected by sealed in lube, nor is the friction point between roller and sprocket working face.

These points need periodic lubrication on both ring chains and non-ring chains.

You can refuse to lube a ring chain and depend on shear luck to keep your chain together, but the odds are very much against you. So, lubrication must happen on both types of chains.

I can also say for a fact, that if a standard roller chain of the same quality of a ring chain, is taken good care of...it can outlast the ring chain. The ring chain has a finite lifespan, even with the best of care. Once the pre-injected lubricant has been consumed, the chain will die soon after from elongation, and there isn nothing you can do to stop it.

The non-ring chain, can still get good lube and cleaning. It has a lifespan that can in fact be longer than the ring chain.

If anything, there is more intense maintenance with a ring chain. And the lifespan thing depends highly on the sort of maintenacne you provide, not the type of equipment you buy.

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i use X-Ring chains because they aid in the long life of the drive and driven sprockets. i've been using sealed chains for 5-6yrs now and will never run a standard chain again. i guess it's a personal choice also. :)

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