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Chain / Sproket

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I'm now due for a new chain/sproket on my YZ450F '04. That's something I don't really know a lot about, all I hear is O-Ring and now X-ring. What's the difference??

Another thing, how many teeth should I get for sprokets? I actually don't know how many there are on stock ones...but anyway, I found my 1st gear too high and my 4th too low. What can I do?

Tell me what you bought and how it feels, tomorrow I'm gonna go order this stuff.

Thanks.

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I put a smaller CS sprocket (front one) on to lower the first gear a bit as I ride a lot of hills with rocks and steep stuff. I think I went from a 14 to a 13. Most online or catalog order firms will tell you what your stock gearing was/is. Dropping one tooth up front is like adding 2 or 3 teeth on back.

With the YZ you cannot have both higher top speed and lower first gear....unless you swap out the tranny gears for a WRs set. It sucks. :naughty:

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Stock sprockets are front = 14, rear = 48. If you want to go faster, add a tooth to the front sprocket or subtract teeth from the rear sprocket. Vice versa if you want more bottom end.

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O-ring chains use o-ring seals at the chain plates to seal in lubricant and keep contaminants out. Maintenance is much simpler, and chain life is generally 2-300% of standard chains. X-ring, Z-ring, and other variants use seals that have cross sections in the shape of an X, Z, or whatever. These are oriented so that the points of the X, Z, etc., bear against the chain plates and act as seal lips. At least in theory, this provides better sealing and reduced friction. There are pros and cons, but the X Z ? chains come at a somewhat higher price, and I am not sure they offer that much extra benefit.

For a whole bunch more on this, read:

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=249106&parentpage=2

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Thanks for your inputs people :naughty:

I do understand all the theory of sproket ratio. I just want to know if I put a 14-47 sprokets, am I gonna loose my 1st gear because I already find it pretty high, I'd like to gain more speed when I go for a trail riding w/o loosing the snap of my first gear especially when I go racing.

As for O/X/Z ring, I'll look for prices at the dealer this afternoon to compare.

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I'm now due for a new chain/sproket on my YZ450F '04. That's something I don't really know a lot about, all I hear is O-Ring and now X-ring. What's the difference??

Another thing, how many teeth should I get for sprokets? I actually don't know how many there are on stock ones...but anyway, I found my 1st gear too high and my 4th too low. What can I do?

Tell me what you bought and how it feels, tomorrow I'm gonna go order this stuff.

Thanks.

14/47 makes you use all of 2-3rd gear longer than a 14/48 - 1st is worthless with both ratios except for pit riding....

Are you riding in the woods or MX or both? MX track length's determine sprocket sizes / gearing

I hate ORing/XRing for MX period! Stay with a good tensile strength non oring

Regina, DID or Renthal chain for MX...Oring if majority riding time is in the woods -

IronMan Sprockets are the best for the 450's for lasting long time - I have both 14/47 and 14/48 for MX set ups -

Call TT Store for prices

or Motosports Outlet has decent prices on combo chain/Sprocket kits - $129 - $189

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Second the Ironman for longevity. Besides which, they're one of the coolest looking rear sprockets ever made. The longest lasting aluminum I know of is the Tag.

I run a 15/49 (I wanted a 14/46, but I would have had to SO the rear sprocket to get that). With that gearing, 1st gear is slightly higher than a 426 (17.2 vs. 18.0 roughly), and 4th falls 2/3 up in between a 426's 4th and 5th, and there's only a 3mph difference in the "on paper" (calculated) top speed between the bikes that way. So to me, it's a good combo that I can run almost anywhere. There's one or two tracks where it seems a little high, but it pulls it OK.

I run a Regina ORS O-ring chain everywhere. Unbelievably good chain.

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I WISH that the YZs first gear was lower, as that very low gearing I posted still leaves me gripping about clutching and stalling in rough areas. It's just not optimal though the power and lightness of the bike begs to be turned into the bEST offroad bike ever.

Guys, I have a confession. I've come to believe that WD40 can adversely affect the o-rings on these chains. I have one o-ring chain on the XR and one on the YZ. I just brush the dirt off the yzs and add no lubricants at all. It is still pliable and in good condition. I wd40d the XRs chain and half the orings are missing, the other half are cracked and the chain is very kinky. It's about 2 years old with very little use. The YZs is about 6 months old with a ton of use. ????? no more WD40 I guess.

AND, I really trust this bikes motor and clutch after last weekend. Nothing but 3 hours of pure abuse. Slipping it, WFO, bouncing through rocks. A little dinged up plastic and a dented mufflercan but the engine took it all and didn't fuss. :)

I love it all but for that 5% of my riding in these steep, rocky tortuous areas that sets me back for heavy lifting, boiling over and bitching about tall gearing.

BTW, I made a bitchen coolant recovery system based on the turkey baster setup. It really does work well too. I've filled that bad boy up twice on the last two grinder rides last weekend and didn't lose a drop of coolant.

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MG,

I spent about half an hour with a bunch of guys in the desert a while back working my high geared YZF up a wash turned canyon that turned into a 35" wide crack in the ground with rocks and 2 foot steps and hard turns, and I can't disagree at all about the toughness of the clutch.

But what a lot of people miss is that at that kind of extremely low speed, there isn't much difference between a 13 and a 14 tooth cog. You have to be moving at least 3-5 mph for it to start to show. Most of our stalling issues are a matter of the very low rotating mass of the YZ450, along with the rather aggressive cam timing, and adding a big ol' flywheel is about the only cure.

I also have to agree with your take on WD-40 , although I have not ever used it on an O-ring chain. It really is not primarily a lubricant or a rust preventative. Mostly, it's a solvent and a water dispersant. It is oily, and will prevent rust in the shortterm, but it's too volatile to do either job for very long. Your chain, of course kinked up because the seals failed and released the lube.

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14/47 makes you use all of 2-3rd gear longer than a 14/48 - 1st is worthless with both ratios except for pit riding....

Are you riding in the woods or MX or both? MX track length's determine sprocket sizes / gearing

I hate ORing/XRing for MX period! Stay with a good tensile strength non oring

Regina, DID or Renthal chain for MX...Oring if majority riding time is in the woods -

IronMan Sprockets are the best for the 450's for lasting long time - I have both 14/47 and 14/48 for MX set ups -

Call TT Store for prices

or Motosports Outlet has decent prices on combo chain/Sprocket kits - $129 - $189

I do mostly MX but sometimes it's fun to just ride in the woods.

Regarding IronMan sprockets, are they affordable?

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MG,

snip

But what a lot of people miss is that at that kind of extremely low speed, there isn't much difference between a 13 and a 14 tooth cog. You have to be moving at least 3-5 mph for it to start to show. Most of our stalling issues are a matter of the very low rotating mass of the YZ450, along with the rather aggressive cam timing, and adding a big ol' flywheel is about the only cure.

.

I may go the flywheel route then for sure. What like 8 or 10 ozs? l still think I need that 13'er as 3-5 mph difference is huge in some of the junk we were playing in. It would have been a tough hiking trail. If we do it again, I'll take the 600 and get some pics :)

The bike is just sooooooo good in the whoops and jumps, though, when the trail opens up, you instantly forget about the nightmare in the canyon...or as the trail is aptly named...The Mule Trail. :D

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Allright I ordered a set of 14/47 JT sprockets plus a RK XW-ring chain 520-114. I'm just hoping it's gonna last very long.

I'll let you know how it is later next week about this stuff.

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I may go the flywheel route then for sure. What like 8 or 10 ozs? l still think I need that 13'er as 3-5 mph difference is huge in some of the junk we were playing in. It would have been a tough hiking trail. If we do it again, I'll take the 600 and get some pics :)

If you're playing in that kind of stuff that often, I'd go with the 8oz Dr.D. He'll let you exchange it for a lighter one if it's too heavy.

My point was not that you shouldn't use a 13 for such trail work, only that regardless of your gearing, stopped is stopped, and in the range of 0-1 mph, the gearing is less of an issue than the flywheel weight and the clutch behavior. Frankly, the YZ450 is a long way out of its element in that sort of extreme trail riding, and it's amazing that they are as versatile as they are.

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Frankly, the YZ450 is a long way out of its element in that sort of extreme trail riding, and it's amazing that they are as versatile as they are.

I sure do agree, but I sooooo love the bikes handling, power and weight. What I wouldn't give for Yamaha to allow you to order a YZ with the WR tranny. That's all I want. The WR tranny. :)

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When you realize that people spend $800 on exhuast systems, the $750 price of the WR trans looks like a pretty good deal, too.

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When you realize that people spend $800 on exhuast systems, the $750 price of the WR trans looks like a pretty good deal, too.

Wifeypoo is not down with any more expenditures :D Looks like I'll have to learn to be a better rider then? Or trash more clutch plates :)

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Of course, it's just the craziest thought, but you could, just could, mind you, sell the XR to finance the gearbox. :)

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