New rings?

Since i had to take my cylinder off i was wondering if its ok to change just the rings like a 2 stroke. bike has alot of time on it.

Well, when I had mine apart I re-used the old piston. I had tons of hours on it but still had all the cross-hatching. I just honed out the cyclindar and installed new rings and had no trouble.

if the piston is in spec and looks good i'd just re-ring and hone the cylinder.. spose to hone the cylinder any time u replace piston or rings i believe.

I'm just a back yard mechanic, but if I'm not mistaken, you don't hone these because of the plating.

Greyracer could probably answer that question better though. He's older and YZ'er.

Very Cute. :naughty:

Nevertheless, yes, hone the cylinder. Use a bottle brush type hone about a half inch larger in diameter than the cylinder. Use a low speed drill, about 500-700 rpm, and run the hone up and down the full length of the bore rapidly as you turn it to give a good cross hatch.

Before anyone mentions it, I saw MXA this month too, and I have no idea who it was that decided that "dingleberry" hones won't work anymore, but they work great for me :naughty: I'm afraid I'm going to disagree.

They great thing is that they are glaze breakers only. The will not remove significant amounts of metal, nor change the shape of the bore. I've used them for years, and have never had a set of rings fail to seat when I used them. My son's 250F was broken in on full synthetic M1 MX4T, and hasn't used a drop since it's 3rd hour.

OK, so i have to hone the cylinder if i put new rings on it? what if i just put new rings on it. it still has the crossing in the cylinder.

Very Cute. :naughty:

Nevertheless, yes, hone the cylinder. Use a bottle brush type hone about a half inch larger in diameter than the cylinder. Use a low speed drill, about 500-700 rpm, and run the hone up and down the full length of the bore rapidly as you turn it to give a good cross hatch.

Before anyone mentions it, I saw MXA this month too, and I have no idea who it was that decided that "dingleberry" hones won't work anymore, but they work great for me :naughty: I'm afraid I'm going to disagree.

They great thing is that they are glaze breakers only. The will not remove significant amounts of metal, nor change the shape of the bore. I've used them for years, and have never had a set of rings fail to seat when I used them. My son's 250F was broken in on full synthetic M1 MX4T, and hasn't used a drop since it's 3rd hour.

Greyracer

Good to know. I'm not sure where I heard that, but I because of that, I didn't hone mine when I put new piston and rings in it. It's very strong and burns no noticable oil. I thought your sig was cool so I couldn't resist.

If you decide to "ball" hone your cylinder, it is very important to make sure you clean the bore completely. The plating is much harder than than the common hone and collects alot of material.

I suggest ATF or Marvel Mystery oil and paper towels. Just keep wiping the bore till the towel comes out clean(no grey). Then assemble with the ATF/MMO residue left on the cylinder wall. JMO Tdub

Excellent point, Tdub. Important even in iron cylinders. :naughty:

If the cylinder is virtually perfect, rings may seat well with no glaze breaking. The new rings will be perfectly round, and if placed in a cylinder that is the same shape, very little wearing down of high spots will have to take place before they are worn to a perfect match with the cylinder. With a fairly low hour nikasil bore, it's believable. But it's enough trouble to go back in and redo it if the rings don't seat that I would run a hone through it first regardless of how it looked. The only time I wouldn't would be in a case where I was going to reuse the original rings.

How many excursions would you make with the ballhone (up and down) ? 5 or 6 times?

Yeah, about that. 5-6 times down and back up. Use a light fluid on the hone, such as kerosene, mineral spirits, or shop solvent. Pull the hone completely free of the cylinder while it's still turning on the last upstroke. If the entire surface has been deglazed, that's enough.

For fun, rinse with solvent, wipe it until you think it's clean, and then take a white cloth and some ATF and wipe through it again. Check the cloth and see how much more was in there! :naughty:

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