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JAYG

oil question

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Hello,

Can anyone recommend the best oil for my 426, im using silkolene pro4 sx 15w-50 at the mo, i dont race, just trails and track riding.

whats the difference between 10w-40 and 15w -50?

J :naughty:

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Your are a newby so I will not beat you too bad - oil has been beat to death - try doing a search on this as you will find more info than you want on this subject

I use Mobile 1 15 -50 redcap - I stocked up on it - :naughty:

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Is the Mobil 1 Red Cap oil for car you mean? Can you show a picture of your bottle please.

I can easily buy this stuff but I'm just wondering about the clutch...is has to be non-energy conservative...

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Don't run the "new" Red Cap, or any oil labeled "energy conserving". The Mobil 1 oil product line was just revamped.

Your best bet is a good synthetic. Your safest bet is one that carries JASO grade MA (made for wet clutch motorcycles specifically), or API SG or SH (which is what an MA oil is). Otherwise, there are several good ones that are marked and graded in other ways that are excellent choices, but offer you no direct way of knowing that from the label. The recommendation of someone who has used it for some time should be relied on in these cases.

I use Mobil 1 MX4T, 10w-40.

Other choices include

M1 V-twin

Shell Rotella T (full synthetic)

Golden Spectro 4 synthetic blend

Motul 5100

Mobil 1 Extended Performance (new, jury's still out, but may be OK)

There's lots of others. A search on the subject will provide hours of reading material.

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whats the difference between 10w-40 and 15w -50?

J :naughty:

Viscosity. That is, in rough terms, the pourability of the oil. Your service manual will provide information as to what the temp range should be for using either of these. 40's are good up to about 114 degrees F, 50's should be used after that, or if temperatures are constantly near that point.

"10w-40" means that the oil at 100 degrees Celsius (212 F) as if it were an SAE 40 weight oil. The same oil at 20 degrees (68 F) is an SAE 10 weight. This indicates that the viscosity is more constant than it would be if it were a single grade oil. A 40 weight at 20 degrees would be much thicker than a 10.

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grayracer513...great info man I just picked up some good info. Unfortunately I don't have any scientific data to support my "opinion" here and it is just that but I have only tried two different types of oils; YAMALUBE and MAXIMA 10w-40. The MAXIMA feels great for about two rides, my bike seems to shift smoother and I get less false neutrals with the MAXIMA than the YAMALUBE after a fresh oil change. BUT the MAXIMA needs to be changed after every 1 or 2 rides if not it really breaks down. It turns dark in color and my bike begans to have trouble shifting. The YAMALUBE seems to work much better for at least 5 or 6 rides.

I should clarify. When I say rides I pretty much mean racing. I might sneak in a practice at one of the lighted tracks here in Socal during the week but I race damn near every Sunday in either SRA or Vet X racing in the "Old Slow Guy's Class".

My .02

MW

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I don't know that much about oil, but my local shop suggested that sticking with Yamalube 10w50 should be fine. They said the most important thing is making sure you change it & clean the filters every few rides. Oil is cheap, new motors aren't...

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If the oil meets the specs outlined in the manual then you should be fine. Any name brand oil that meets these specs should give you fine performance.

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Your best bet is a good synthetic. .

NO NO NO NO!! i am telling all of you, never use synthetic in your bikes. why? because our 426's and 450's use the same oil for our clutch as our engine. synthetic oil is VERY bad for your clutch and you WILL burn it out. dprecently with speaking to a mechanic, the number one reason these bieks are having engine troubles is oil. 1) people dont change it enough, and 2)people use to thin of an oil. i know of two bikes so far being rebuilt do to this. your best bet is 15w/40. it is diesel oil and is very thick. these 4-stokes thin the oilk out when they get hot, and your regular 10w/30 isnt going to cut it. another thing is let your bike warm up. this gets everything lubricated and the oil warmed up for your ride. if you do not do this you will regret it. your best bet is to use no synthetic yumalube or what i reccomend is 15w/40. i hope i have helped you

kevin

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Kevin,

Clutch problems have nothing to do with a synthetic or mineral base stock, it's the additive package, more specifically the amount of a certain additives that can cause clutch slippage.

Feed your beast the proper grade and amount of clean, cool and dry oil and it will live long and prosper. As to the synthetic vs. mineral oil debate remember this:

Oil is always cheaper than steel

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NO NO NO NO!! i am telling all of you, never use synthetic in your bikes. why? because our 426's and 450's use the same oil for our clutch as our engine. synthetic oil is VERY bad for your clutch and you WILL burn it out. dprecently with speaking to a mechanic, the number one reason these bieks are having engine troubles is oil. 1) people dont change it enough, and 2)people use to thin of an oil. i know of two bikes so far being rebuilt do to this. your best bet is 15w/40. it is diesel oil and is very thick. these 4-stokes thin the oilk out when they get hot, and your regular 10w/30 isnt going to cut it. another thing is let your bike warm up. this gets everything lubricated and the oil warmed up for your ride. if you do not do this you will regret it. your best bet is to use no synthetic yumalube or what i reccomend is 15w/40. i hope i have helped you

kevin

I'm sorry to be the one to tell you this, but you are an idiot. You have probably been one for some time now and didn't realize it because there was no one around to tell you, but that time is over. I am telling you now that you might possibly be one of the most idiotic people that has ever walked the face of the earth.

Please ride your bike to the nearest cliff and ride right over the edge. I don't think there is any saving you...

If you choose to ignore my recommendation, at least please refrain from giving any more bad advice in the remainder of your time here...

Literally thousands of people right here on this forum, including myself, run full synth with no problems at all. You sir, have been misinformed.

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NO NO NO NO!! i am telling all of you, never use synthetic in your bikes. why? because our 426's and 450's use the same oil for our clutch as our engine. synthetic oil is VERY bad for your clutch and you WILL burn it out. dprecently with speaking to a mechanic, the number one reason these bieks are having engine troubles is oil. 1) people dont change it enough, and 2)people use to thin of an oil. i know of two bikes so far being rebuilt do to this. your best bet is 15w/40. it is diesel oil and is very thick. these 4-stokes thin the oilk out when they get hot, and your regular 10w/30 isnt going to cut it. another thing is let your bike warm up. this gets everything lubricated and the oil warmed up for your ride. if you do not do this you will regret it. your best bet is to use no synthetic yumalube or what i reccomend is 15w/40. i hope i have helped you

kevin

Kevin,

I realize that you're young, so without using harsh language, let me say that out of everything you have said, only two of your points are correct: People very often don't change their oil frequently enough (which is even more important than what oil you use), and you should indeed give the bike a moment to at least get the oil circulating, especially with a dry sump that has stood unused for a week. It's even more important if you're using paper oil filters, as they bypass madly when cold.

The base stock used to create the oil is not the reason that it might be incompatible with a wet clutch. Oils labeled as Friction Modified, or Energy Conserving have high levels of molybdenum and other additives that interfere with the operation of wet clutches. There are any number of synthetics that do not have these, and work just fine, as you will see if you peruse this forum. The Japanese Automotive Standards Organization (JASO) created a particular grade, MA, for oils that could be certified compatible with a wet clutch. This was done in response to the introduction of EC oils and the reduction of critical anti-wear additives. Any oil that carries the JASO MA grade WILL work with your clutch, regardless of what it was made from. I have to also say that the lack of this grade does not necessarily mean that it won't. The old Red Cap and Shell Rotella T Syn have never had it, mostly because they never applied for it.

Diesel oil is distinguished by API grades of C*, such as CF, C-14, etc., not by it's viscosity markings. If you look at your manual, the recommended temperature ranges for different viscosities are listed, including 10w-30.

Synthetics offer a distinct advantage over multigrade "dino" oils, and that is that they behave as multigrade oils without as much of the chemical additives used to make mineral oils behave that way. Since these additives tend to get physically torn up by your transmission, a mineral based 10w-40 will turn out to be a 6w-20 in an alarmingly short period of time. Synthetics are much more durable (shear stable) in this regard.

In between doing your regular homework assignments, let me give you another. Read this article: About Oil

Your report on it is not due until the next time you want to contribute to an oil discussion. :naughty:

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I'm sorry to be the one to tell you this, but you are an idiot. You have probably been one for some time now and didn't realize it because there was no one around to tell you, but that time is over. I am telling you now that you might possibly be one of the most idiotic people that has ever walked the face of the earth.

Please ride your bike to the nearest cliff and ride right over the edge. I don't think there is any saving you...

If you choose to ignore my recommendation, at least please refrain from giving any more bad advice in the remainder of your time here...

Literally thousands of people right here on this forum, including myself, run full synth with no problems at all. You sir, have been misinformed.

Oh yeh you sound real sorry to tell him that. :naughty:

Can I save that and use it sometime when another dummy comes along?

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...you are an idiot.
Your habit of equivocating on everything is really starting to annoy me. Try to be more direct in the future, please?

:naughty:

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Your are a newby so I will not beat you too bad - oil has been beat to death - try doing a search on this as you will find more info than you want on this subject

I use Mobile 1 15 -50 redcap - I stocked up on it - :naughty:

this would be the old red cap :naughty: My clutch loves this stuff :D

I know several that are running the new gold cap mobile1 w/o any problems - :D

I also have Yamalube 4R - Semi synth if anyone wants it - my clutch hates it!!!! :D

I hope I do not fall into the "IDIOTIC CATEGORY" :cry:

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ya ok why dont you just shut your mouth retard saying i should go off a cliff. your right, the mechanic, the mechanis whos worked on bikes all his life, oh yeah and the mechanics teacher whos been teaching college for 30 years, my friend who races mx, they must all not know what they're talknig about. maybe some synthetics carry that specialk additive to work well on wet clutches but the majority do ont. and despite what your manual says, 10w/30 will turn too thin when it gets hot, but hell, go ahead. just dont go tell me that im the most idiotic person or some crap, either regular 15w/40 or yumalube is the best for your bike. but hey, you know it all.....

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And at 15, you do? :naughty:

And yes, unfortunately, if everyone on that list supports the contention that synthetics can't be used in wet clutch motorcycle engines, they are all, in fact, wrong. :naughty: Can't help it. Facts are facts. You can't change them through denial. Overdrive hammered you pretty hard, but my guess is he didn't spot you for being a kid. Over-reacting is not going to help you here, though. You're better off reading the article I posted and actually trying to learn something.

BTW, I was a mechanic for 35 years, up to 2001, when I changed jobs. Just so you know we're not all a bunch of beer drinking rednecks hanging out behind the house with the Harley and making stuff up as we go along.

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